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The Germans - Bismarck and the German Empire | DW Documentary
 
42:28
Prussia's Prime Minister Otto von Bismarck paved the way for the first German nation-state. Bismarck became the Chancellor of the new German Empire. The failure of Germany’s March Revolution (1848/49), a futile attempt by bourgeois liberal forces to restrict the power of Germany’s rulers, unite the German Confederation and establish a constitutional parliament, led to the imposition of "unity from above” as Prussia's Prime Minister Otto von Bismarck paved the way for the first German nation-state. By the mid-19th century, Germans were still not united in one state. The Prussian Prime Minister Otto von Bismarck wanted to change that - not through parliaments or majorities but, as he said, "with blood and iron." At that time, the German Confederation was an alliance of more than 30 independent states, with Austria and Prussia at their head. But when Prussia wanted to incorporate the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein against Austria's will, it became a test of power: Who had the say in Germany? Austria or Prussia? The vote for war or peace took place in Frankfurt am Main, the seat of the German federation, on 14 June 1866. Austria's proposal to mobilize the federation’s forces against Prussia was accepted. Prussia saw the vote as a declaration of war and walked out of the federation. That spelt its end, because the member states were doing exactly what it was set up to prevent, going to war with each other. Austria’s armies were routed, and from now on Germany and Austria went their separate ways. Austria was literally pushed out of German history. Bismarck’s victory over Austria was a triumph worth a monument to the Prussian fatherland: the Victory Column in Berlin. The North German Confederation of 1866 under Prussian leadership was the precursor to the united Germany of a few years later. The south German states such as Bavaria, Baden and Württemberg were initially aloof but that changed with the war against France in 1870. The common enemy united the Germans and their nation. In January 1871, Bismarck declared the birth of the Prussian-German nation-state in the palace of Versailles. For the first time in their history, the Germans were united in a single state with a single capital: Berlin. Bismarck became the Chancellor of the new German Empire. The overall balance of his domestic policies was mixed. On the one hand, they saw the creation of a modern parliamentary system and a welfare state with health, accident and pension insurance. But on the other, Bismarck was pitted against both Social Democracy and the Catholic Church. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 182609 DW Documentary
Where does your fruit come from and at what cost? | DW Documentary
 
26:16
Costa Rica is the world’s largest pineapple producer and Germany’s main supplier of the fruit. Cheap labor and pesticides mean low prices in Western Europe. While organic pineapples are now being farmed on a larger scale to increasing demand, this likewise has negative consequences for Costa Rica’s ecosystem. Tropical fruits such as pineapples, bananas and kiwis have been available in West European supermarkets for years. But the innocent appearance of these popular products is deceptive. The fruits are cheap because costs are cut in the production countries - affecting wages and health factors. Costa Rica is the world’s largest pineapple producer, and is known both for its exemplary ecological approach and for sustainable tourism. It is in this very country, however, where workers on plantations complain about a lack of rights. Pineapples are grown and harvested here in vast monoculture plantations using huge amounts of pesticides. According to studies conducted by Costa Rica’s national university, the country is not just a major tropical fruit exporter but also the world’s biggest per-hectare user of pesticides. Plantation workers have as a result been reporting rashes and headaches. At the heart of pineapple farming, to the northeast of the capital of San José, trucks regularly have to supply villages with clean drinking water because the groundwater has been contaminated with bromacil - a weed killer banned in the EU. In the north of the country huge pineapple plantations are threatening the livelihoods of traditional small farmers, while conventional banana plantations continue to grow across the southwest. Many supermarkets in Europe have recognized that they can make money with sustainability. Almost all the major chains have signed up to ecological quality seals that stand for responsible growing methods with low pesticide use. The example of Costa Rica, however, shows that such promises aren’t always strictly kept. Although there are farmers who have set up their own businesses with the new growing methods, and although the organic sector in Costa Rica is constantly growing, even organic bananas and pineapples require large areas of land for farming. The result is monocultures with consequences for the ecosystem. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary?sub_confirmation=1 For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 297655 DW Documentary
Shanghai - life in the megacity | DW Documentary
 
25:56
Shanghai, China’s biggest city, has the world’s biggest port and the longest underground railway system. The city offers seemingly endless opportunities. This city is a pulsating symbol of China’s rise to a super power on the international stage. Shanghai's skyline is soaring to ever-new heights. The 600-meter-high Shanghai Tower is the second tallest building in the world. Almost everything in the Chinese megacity of Shanghai is bigger and faster than anywhere else. Shanghai is also expanding underground: every day, more than 10 million passengers travel through the subway tunnels beneath the city – a volume only surpassed by Tokyo. Thirty thousand close circuit cameras monitor the traffic. The 24 million inhabitants have to race to keep up. A driving force behind China’s rapid change, Shanghai is a city of superlatives and eventful history. The documentary shows how Chinese people in Shanghai go about their everyday lives. Li Langbin is a dock worker; Li Yinfeng a security officer in the subway; and 25-year-old Dai Meng a singer rising to fame. These are some of the faces behind this dynamic city. Entrepreneurs from all over the world also see the potential here in Shanghai. David Li has returned from the USA to launch a cutting edge start-up for autonomous driving. Many start-ups here operate at world-class level. And the Chinese are very receptive to new technologies. China is very keen for Chinese businesses to become international players in future technologies – providing 100 billion euros’ worth of grants. Many local governments also offer start-ups free premises. There are well-trained, well-motivated employees in the Chinese city of Shanghai – and wages are a lot lower than in Silicon Valley. In start-ups it’s normal to work twelve hours a day, six days a week. The skyscrapers in the Pudong district are a symbol of China's burgeoning economic growth. Not far away, old districts that still bear the traces of Chinese history including European colonialism, Japanese occupation and Mao's Cultural Revolution are disappearing. We meet people like Mr. Xi, who is opposed to this wave of modernization in China and refuses to leave his 100-year-old Shikumen house, even though most of his neighbors have already gone. Shanghai’s breakneck pace affects people within the city, throughout the rest of China and on an international scale. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary?sub_confirmation=1 For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 684035 DW Documentary
Saint Helena - a remote island in the Atlantic | DW Documentary
 
25:56
Every third week, a British Royal Mail ship begins its journey from Cape Town to Saint Helena, the remote island in the Atlantic where Napoleon was once in exile. It’s like the end of the world in the middle of the Atlantic. Five days, with a northwesterly course, and only then do the sheer black cliffs appear in front of RMS St. Helena. The island’s 45000 residents are often waiting impatiently for the ship’s arrival and panic if the schedule changes. Director Thomas Denzel and his team went on the journey to Saint Helena and met the people living on the island. Many of the residents are descendants of people who were sent into exile there by the British crown - the most famous among them, the French Emperor Napoleon. This is a report about life at the end of the world, loneliness, unique vegetation, and a very special journey. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 641297 DW Documentary
Interpol - who controls the world police? | DW Documentary
 
42:26
Is Interpol, the international criminal police organization, losing its integrity? The media rarely gets to look behind the scenes at Interpol. [Online until: 16.08.2018] Nearly 200 countries belong to the 'international super-police' agency - but it’s funding does not cover its ambitious projects. That is why Interpol has entered collaborating with corporations, shady groups embroiled and controversial states, something hitherto unthinkable. The forerunner of the present organization was founded nearly a century ago to strengthen cooperation between national police authorities. With increasing globalization and the associated rise in international organized crime, the challenges for the agency, which now has 192 member-states, have also grown. When Ronald Noble, an American, became Secretary General of Interpol in 2000, the world's largest police organization underwent a dramatic turnaround. Noble's dream was to create an 'international super-police'. To achieve that goal, Interpol entered into previously unimaginable cooperation agreements with large corporations such as Philip Morris International and Sanofi, as well as organizations suspected of corruption such as FIFA. Interpol has been criticized for disregarding serious conflicts of interest arising from the potential influence of private donors on investigations. At the same time, some controversial countries began to fund the world police. In March 2017, for example, the United Arab Emirates gave Interpol 50 million euros - as much as contributions from all the other member states put together. But surely such a grant from a single country raises questions about the independence of the recipient. What alliances is Interpol prepared to enter into in order to expand? Is it possible to finance policing through private donations without compromising integrity and accountability? Is this the first step toward a new world order in which collaboration between police authorities and large international companies is seen as normal? _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 149112 DW Documentary
The dark side of the tea trade | DW Documentary
 
28:26
Why are Indian tea workers not benefiting from the global tea boom? Many tea workers live in bitter poverty, while others profit from their labor. In Germany, consumers are prepared to pay high prices for top-quality tea. But tea plantation workers in Darjeeling and Assam are not benefiting from the global tea culture boom. They live in squalid conditions, with no access to clean drinking water or sanitation. Though they are exposed to highly toxic pesticides at work, they are not equipped with any kind of protective clothing. And yet some of the tea produced under such conditions is labeled as Fair Trade Certified. In response to the findings of this report, some manufacturers have seen their Fair Trade certifications suspended or withdrawn. The combination of pesticide use and grinding poverty on tea plantations is particularly harmful for workers’ children. Professor Anup Kumar from Assam Medical College and Hospital in Dibrugarh says the dismal living and working conditions affect children before they are even born. "Children on the tea plantations are poorly nourished, their growth and development is delayed, and child mortality is high." Ultimately, the pesticides used in tea farming also end up in consumers’ tea cups. Researchers found up to eight different types of pesticides in Indian tea sold in German supermarkets. Many of these substances are so dangerous that they are banned in Germany. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 157411 DW Documentary
China's New Silk Road | DW Documentary
 
42:41
A modern trade route between Asia and Europe is under construction. The gigantic project is the brainchild of Chinese president Xi Jinping. The New Silk Road is one of the most ambitious undertakings by far to be put forward by the Chinese president Xi Jinping. 10,000 kilometers of road, a railway line and a shipping route are to run from western China to Europe via Kazakhstan, the Urals and Moscow. Since the start of the 21st century China has become the most important export nation on the global stage. But in light of increasing tensions in the South China Sea and the threat from North Korea, it’s becoming more and more important for China to open up alternative trade routes. As a result the country has turned its gaze westward, to central Asia with its many resources and to Europe, which is still its most important trading partner. The construction of the road with the parallel railway line has already begun in Chongqing, a megacity in the country’s interior that’s just one example of the economic boom of the past thirty years. The products made here will, it’s hoped, reach European customers effortlessly in a few years’ time. But it’s not just China’s exporters who hope to benefit from this infrastructure project. Rural regions in the west of the country should also see a boost. There’s the province of Xinjiang for example, which has seen little of the economic growth of recent years. But China’s ambitions go beyond its national borders. The planned New Silk Road runs past rich oil fields as it goes through Kazakhstan. The extraction of oil is to be ramped up, thereby securing China’s growing need for energy. By extending the route all the way to the edge of the Urals, Beijing can get all the way to Russia. But it’s not certain whether the former big brother will welcome the expansion of China’s sphere of influence all the way to central Asia and Europe. In the form of a geopolitical road movie, this documentary looks at the far-reaching shifts in the Eurasian power balance. Sooner or later the Europeans will have to take a stance on China’s new ‘soft imperialism’. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 1135625 DW Documentary
The Germans - Frederick and the empress | DW Documentary
 
42:30
After the Thirty Years' War, there was a dramatic rivalry between the Prussian King Frederick II and the ruler of the House of Habsburg Maria Theresa. The path to German nationhood was riven with conflict. After the Thirty Years' War, the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation resembled a territorial patchwork, an obstacle to any national development along Western European lines. The lack of a central power meant new powers emerged on the periphery. In particular, the rise of Brandenburg-Prussia changed the power structures in the Reich forever. Two nations in particular struggled for domination over the German Empire, which was fragmented into smaller principalities and monarchies. Austria was already a great power under the Habsburgs, Prussia wanted to become one. There was a power struggle between the vivacious Habsburg Maria Theresa from Catholic Vienna and the reserved Hohenzollern king Frederick II from Protestant Potsdam, also known as Frederick the Great. The two rulers never met in person. Both wanted to be absolute autocrats, but not despots. And both believed it was their first duty to serve their own state and that the interests of the Holy Roman Empire were of secondary importance. The conflict between the two powers culminated in the Seven Years' War, which brought great devastation to Germany. Only the Peace of Hubertusburg in 1763 ended the fierce struggle for supremacy in the empire, which neither side could ultimately win. Both rulers encouraged cultural prosperity and diversity. Johann Sebastian Bach composed music for Frederick the Great, and the rulers of the many small territories were patrons of architects, poets, painters and musicians. It was the time of the rising romantic "Sturm und Drang" movement, and Lessing, Goethe and Schiller were writing their timeless works. The "dualism" of the two powers - embodied in the rulers Frederick II and Maria Theresa - finally brought about the end of the old empire and determined the course of German history until the middle of the 19th century. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 106273 DW Documentary
From Rio to Lima – Transoceânica, the world's longest bus journey (2/5) | DW Documentary
 
42:32
The Amazon basin in Brazil is home to the indigenous Suri people – and is also the next stop on our bus ride down the Transoceânica highway. The drive along the longest bus route in the world continues through South America. Passing through Rondônia, passengers expect an unforgettable journey through the Amazon basin. But there isn’t much left to see of the jungle – deforestation means the rainforest is shrinking, and with it the indigenous people who call it home. Before the highway passed through their land, the Suri tribe lived here. But outsiders carrying smallpox wiped out nearly the whole population. Those that are left live on a reserve and are fighting to protect the rainforest. The bus hits problems as it continues through Rondônia. In Vista Alegre do Abunã, the villagers have blocked the road with a burning barricade. Will the bus be able to get round it? Parts 1-5: Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_ODFlqURxY Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIeq7LpfX88 Part 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbAoM23sK7o Part 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sVazu3D5hY _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 70542 DW Documentary
The Germans - Barbarossa and the lion | DW Documentary
 
42:49
In the Middle Ages, Friedrich I, also called "Barbarossa", was regarded as a brilliant ruler who fought for the "honor of the empire." The fate of the Hohenstaufen dynasty mirrored the rise and fall of the medieval Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation. Frederick I reigned from 1152 until his death in 1190. "Barbarossa", as he was called, was considered by his contemporaries to be a beacon of power and virtue. This documentary explores his reign. Frederick I’s absolute commitment to his role as a defender of western Christianity divided his attention between German and international interests. At the same time, he came into conflict with the Pope. The city states of northern Italy likewise challenged the sovereignty of the German ruler. As he struggled to impose his will on Italy, back in Germany regional leaders gained strength at his expense. Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony and Bavaria, was Barbarossa's cousin, loyal vassal - and sometimes his foe. Henry was known for ruthlessly expanding his territory. He conquered new territories to the east for the empire, and pursued a planned policy of settlement and Christianization. Like Barbarossa, "the Lion" also made a name for himself as a founder of cities. When the duke refused to swear allegiance to the emperor, he was banished. Barbarossa's rule coincided with the crusades and the great age of chivalry. The cities became more independent. A new middle class emerged, as did craftsmen's guilds and merchant networks. The modern German language evolved, together with chivalric prose and poetry. Local rulers continued to defend their independence. They elected the king, and effectively ruled under him. Things would stay that way until the end of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation in 1806. And as for Barbarossa himself - the emperor drowned soon after departing on a crusade to Jerusalem. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 85945 DW Documentary
The last Kalinga tattoo artist, Whang Od | DW Documentary
 
26:20
Meet Whang Od. She lives in the Philippines and is the last master of the art of traditional, hand-tapped Filipino tattoos. Whang Od is 93 and her body is adorned with snakes and millipedes. She is the last practitioner of a very special art form – and all she needs for this art form, are charcoal, water, a dash of sugar cane juice for shine, and the thorns of the orange tree, which she uses as needles. She’s highly sought after by young people around the world. The film accompanies Charly and Egan, two brave young men who have travelled to the remote village Buscalan to meet Whang Od. ‘Some wet their pants because they’re so scared,’ says Whang Od and laughs. Even getting to the village she lives in is a challenge: a narrow path leads through the jungle, deep down into a canyon and finally up into the mountains. ‘You can fly to the Moon, but you can’t build a road to Buscalan,’ say the people in Kalinga province, a region more remote and unexplored than any other in the country. Reporter Philipp Abresch took the trek upon himself - with the help of twenty-five porters. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 485018 DW Documentary
Eva Braun (2/2) - life and death with Adolf Hitler | DW Documentary
 
42:26
In 1945 Adolf Hitler and Eva Braun committed suicide in a bunker in Berlin. Eva Braun only became publicly known after her death. [Online until: 18.08.2018] Eva Braun was Adolf Hitler's secret mistress for more than 13 years. To this day she is viewed as a naïve, apolitical appendage to the dictator and mass murderer. This two-part documentary calls into question the image of the vapid young woman at the Führer's side. Eva Braun met Hitler in 1929 and became his lover when she was just 17 years old. During the years of their relationship, she evolved from an average middle class girl to the uncompromising partner of the mass murderer. She remained true to Hitler until death. On 30 April 1945 Hitler and Eva Braun committed suicide in the bunker beneath the Reich Chancellery in Berlin. A day earlier, the dictator had married her. But who was this 'bride of evil' really? Hitler's architect Albert Speer referred to her after the war as one of the "disappointments of history". Kept out of the public eye, she spent most of her time in Munich or at Hitler's Berghof residence in the Alps. There she lived officially as the dictator's private secretary. Historian Heike Görtemaker has tracked down and assembled the puzzle pieces of Eva Braun's life in a groundbreaking biography. Behind the assumed gaiety, the author finds a resolute woman who pursued her goals with tremendous toughness right up to her death. For this documentary, filmmaker Michael Kloft conducted detailed interviews with Görtemaker and evaluated the many private films made by Eva Braun as well as the countless photo albums she compiled. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 103222 DW Documentary
How the rich get richer – money in the world economy | DW Documentary
 
42:25
Exploding real estate prices, zero interest rate and a rising stock market – the rich are getting richer. What danger lies in wait for average citizens? For years, the world’s central banks have been pursuing a policy of cheap money. The first and foremost is the ECB (European Central Bank), which buys bad stocks and bonds to save banks, tries to fuel economic growth and props up states that are in debt. But what relieves state budgets to the tune of hundreds of billions annoys savers: interest rates are close to zero. The fiscal policies of the central banks are causing an uncontrolled global deluge of money. Experts are warning of new bubbles. In real estate, for example: it’s not just in German cities that prices are shooting up. In London, a one-bed apartment can easily cost more than a million Euro. More and more money is moving away from the real economy and into the speculative field. Highly complex financial bets are taking place in the global casino - gambling without checks and balances. The winners are set from the start: in Germany and around the world, the rich just get richer. Professor Max Otte says: "This flood of money has caused a dangerous redistribution. Those who have, get more." But with low interest rates, any money in savings accounts just melts away. Those with debts can be happy. But big companies that want to swallow up others are also happy: they can borrow cheap money for their acquisitions. Coupled with the liberalization of the financial markets, money deals have become detached from the real economy. But it’s not just the banks that need a constant source of new, cheap money today. So do states. They need it to keep a grip on their mountains of debt. It’s a kind of snowball system. What happens to our money? Is a new crisis looming? The film 'The Money Deluge' casts a new and surprising light on our money in these times of zero interest rates. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 987250 DW Documentary
Summer of extremes - crowded beaches and failing crops | DW Documentary
 
28:26
Germany is in the throes of a scorching heatwave. For seaside resorts, it’s a boon. But farmers fear massive crop losses and demand billions in aid. High temperatures across the country – good news for some but a disaster for others. The scene is almost apocalyptic on some of Germany’s farms: burning grain fields, dried-up soil and withered crops. In some areas, nothing is growing at all any more, while animals suffer in the dry heat. Home gardeners have been desperately watering their plants while city authorities are calling on their residents to water the trees in the streets. Barbecues are banned due to the risk of wildfires in many of Germany’s city parks, and fireworks displays have had to be canceled. And there seems to be no end to the sweltering heat. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 112295 DW Documentary
The Germans - Otto and the empire | DW Documentary
 
42:51
Otto the Great is the progenitor of Germany and German history begins with him. During his reign, the four main tribes on German territory began to unite. Otto is the king who brought the Saxon, Bavarian, Swabian and Franconian tribes to perceive themselves as a community. This documentary examines his role as a unifier. Otto the Great led his men to victory over Hungarian aggressors in the Battle of Lechfeld in 955. Some 12 thousand warriors followed the call to arms their king made near Augsburg. Together they successfully defended "their" country. External threats forged the tribes together. Something like a sense of belonging developed. But Otto had more foes than the Hungarians. Power hungry princes and even his own family made life difficult. Again and again, regional rulers pressured him. Many of the problems Otto the Great faced with the princes were something like those German Chancellor Angela Merkel has in a present-day form with the premiers of Germany's federal states. Yet now it's above all about money rather than life itself. Otto fought wars with nearly every member of his family. His mother and siblings conspired against his rule. The trouble began when Otto's father, Henry I - or Henry the Fowler - broke with tradition by not dividing his kingdom among his sons. Instead, only one - Otto - would become king. Like Charlemagne, Otto wanted to claim the rights of a Roman Emperor. To do that, he had to travel to Italy, crossing the Alps with more than one thousand troops in 961. He was also answering an appeal from Pope John XII, whose sovereignty over Rome was being challenged by a prince. Otto emerged victorious and cemented his reign in Italy. Then on February 2, 962, Otto the Saxon was crowned Holy Roman Emperor. He remained in Italy for more than a decade. Otto the Great and his retinue travelled to Italy as Saxons, Swabians, Franks and Bavarians. They returned home with the Emperor's crown and the name that the Italians had given them. It was a name they would become used to and ultimately apply themselves - the Germans. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 148804 DW Documentary
From Rio to Lima – Transoceânica, the world's longest bus journey (3/5) | DW Documentary
 
42:32
From Brazil to Peru via the Andes, the bus crosses its first international border as it continues its trip through the Amazon of South America. This section of the Transoceânica highway is known as the “Gold Road”, where fortune hunters and adventurers illegally pan for gold. A raid on illegal gold prospectors is underway. The Peruvian government estimates that 20,000 people are panning for gold here - illegally. At the end of May 2016, most of the region of Madre de Dios was declared an emergency area after mercury used in gold extraction threatened to poison 50,000 people. Every few months, raids are carried out - but with limited success. The panhandlers return to their sites soon after the police have left. During the raids, the prospectors sometimes block the highway for days. But the Transoceânica bus passes through this region without incident. Parts 1-5: Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_ODFlqURxY Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gkdt36SNc7Q Part 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbAoM23sK7o&t=46s Part 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sVazu3D5hY _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 53904 DW Documentary
Avocado - a positive superfood trend? | DW Documentary
 
28:26
From avocado toast to guacamole, this superfood has stolen the hearts of foodies and the health conscious around the world. But where do avocados come from? Avocados have become a huge food trend in the Western world, where the creamy fruit has become readily available in shops, cafes and restaurants. The avocado is considered a superfood and is popular in Europe because of its nutritional value. Avocados are high in calories, contain mostly monounsaturated fat and are good for cholesterol. The fruit is full of essential nutrients, including potassium and vitamin C. But there's a darker side to the fashionable fruit popular on toast or in salads. In Chile, one of the world's largest suppliers, avocado cultivation has dramatic consequences and has been linked to water shortages, human rights violations and an environmentally damage. The province of Petorca has a long tradition of avocado farming. Once grown by small farmers, production has been soaring since the global avocado boom of the 1990s. Big landowners now dominate the avocado market there. And their business requires large amounts of water. It takes up to 1000 liters of water to grow one kilo of the fruit (about three avocados) - a lot more than for a kilo of tomatoes or potatoes. The region is suffering an acute water shortage, exacerbated by climate change. The riverbeds dried up years ago. Trucks bring tanks of water to families in need, while thousands of hectares of avocado groves just next door are watered with artificial reservoirs. Rodrigo Mundaca founded the NGO Modatima. He fights for the right to water - a right that’s guaranteed by the UN and that Chile has committed to. An aerial survey in 2012 revealed that 64 pipelines were diverting river water underground, apparently to irrigate the avocado fields. When the Modatima activists publicly voiced their criticism, they received death threats. Water became a commodity in Chile in 1981 under the Pinochet dictatorship, meaning it’s privatized. Those who offer the most money get water licenses, even for life, regardless of the potential consequences for the ecosystem. The avocado also has a pretty dire environmental footprint. They’re packaged to prevent damage and transported in air-conditioned cargo ships to Europe. The fruit then ripens in a factory in Rotterdam, before it’s sent "ready to eat” to German supermarkets. "Europe wants to eat healthily - at our expense,” says Mundaca. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary?sub_confirmation=1 For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 255620 DW Documentary
From Rio to Lima – Transoceânica, the world's longest bus journey (5/5) | DW Documentary
 
42:32
In the final installment of Transoceânica, the bus goes from the Andes to the Peruvian coastal desert and then on to the capital Lima. In Peru, roughly three times as many people, per capita, are killed on the roads as in Germany or France. Dangerous places in the Andes are often given names such as "Death Bend" or "Jinxed Bend”, marking the spot where people have died. On the high plateau of the Andes, we find vicuñas, a type of lama, which produce the most expensive wool in the world. However, a parasite has recently decimated vicuña stocks, attacking the animals’ skin, leaving them unable to cope with the cold and rain. The western slopes of the Andes are dusty and dry. These mark the start of the Peruvian coastal desert, where the Nazca culture developed over 2,000 years ago. All that remains now are the famous Nazca Lines, enormous geoglyphs etched into the hard floor of the desert. The road then turns north along the Pacific coast, where there are numerous fishing villages. One of them is Pisco, where the local fishing trade has been badly hit by the El Niño weather phenomenon. And then finally, after 144 hours and 6,300 kilometers on the bus, we arrive in Lima - just two days late. Watch the other parts of the journey: Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_ODFlqURxY&t=6s Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gkdt36SNc7Q Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIeq7LpfX88 Part 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbAoM23sK7o&t=46s _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39... For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 50379 DW Documentary
German reunification - a short history | DW Documentary
 
42:40
The fall of the Berlin Wall changed the course of history overnight. But German Reunification was never a guarantee. The situation could have spiraled out of control at any moment. Find out more in 2 + 4 + X: A SHORT HISTORY OF GERMAN REUNIFICATION. West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl took advantage of the chaos during this turbulent time. His 10-point plan paved the way for the reunification of a divided Germany - but this was done behind the backs of the Allied Forces. Those who witnessed the events tell the story of the “2+4” negotiations and rocky road the world took to reunite the GDR with the West. ____________ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 141587 DW Documentary
The Germans - Charlemagne and the Saxons | DW Documentary
 
42:49
Charlemagne’s empire extended from the North Sea to the Mediterranean and from the Pyrenees to the Danube. He is widely regarded as the "Father of Europe." Many European nations trace their origins to the time of the Carolingian emperor. Charlemagne also laid the foundations for many important developments that took place within the territory that would later become Germany. The boundaries of the Carolingian Empire are similar to those that were formed by Europe’s "Inner Six" 1,200 years later. Those six nations: Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, Luxembourg and the Netherlands became the founding members of the European Economic Community. Charlemagne, who is believed to have lived between 748 and 814, created more than an empire. He also imposed order and laid the cornerstones for what was to become a common religious and cultural identity. He wanted to rule over all of Roman Christendom and not just the Franks. Faith was one of the things that gave cohesion to his realm. On Christmas Day in the year 800, he became the first western European ruler to be crowned emperor in Rome. The Roman title and the concept of an empire then became attached to the Carolingian dynasty, something that eastern Carolingian and German kings also later laid claim to. Charlemagne created the basis for what would become the German Empire through his conquests in Central Europe. He waged war on the Saxons for thirty years, until he brutally subjugated them and forced them to accept Christianity or die. The inclusion of Saxony shifted the center of the Carolingian Empire east. After Charlemagne's realm split into western and eastern halves a century later, it was none other than the descendants of the heathen Saxons who demonstrated the power, determination and influence to follow in the footsteps of the great emperor. The German tribes elected Otto the Great as the "east Carolingian" king and he went on to be crowned Holy Roman Emperor. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 159315 DW Documentary
Germany’s poor pensioners | DW Documentary
 
12:01
Poverty threatens more German seniors than ever. How to make ends meet, when pension isn’t enough? Herbert worked nearly his entire life, as a welder and as a sailor. But he never put much thought into his pension. Now at 65, he barely receives enough to make ends meet. He can hardly afford daily expenses, not to mention hobbies or a vacation. The number of people in Germany struck with the same fate as Herbert is on the rise. At 15%, the rate of pensioners living at poverty level has leapt higher than any other segment in society. Herbert relies on food donations and collects bottles left behind by party-revelers for extra cash. It’s not easy for him, but he has no other choice. Just like so many other pensioners, even in Germany’s wealthiest regions. A report by Axel Rowohlt. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 328534 DW Documentary
Organic food - hype or hope? | DW Documentary
 
42:33
There is growing demand in the western world for organic food. But do consumers always get what it says on the label? How can authenticity be verified? Is organic food automatically healthier? Consumers are prepared to pay a significant premium for it. There are currently, however, no reliable tests for distinguishing organic from conventionally produced food. Farmers need to invest a great deal of time, energy and money to qualify as a producer of organic food. There is no proof, however, that organic food actually contains fewer contaminants than conventionally farmed products. There is no such thing as pollution-free food, and there are currently no tests available for reliably distinguishing between organic and non-organic food. That opens doors for lucrative labeling fraud, which in turn explains why there are far more organic eggs on the market at Easter than at any other time of the year. The statistics clearly suggest manipulation, but it is hard to obtain evidence due to the differences between the two production processes appearing to have little effect on the quality of the product. Irish dairy farmers, for instance, are not allowed to label their milk "organic" because the pasture land where their herds spend more than 300 days a year are treated with mineral fertilizers. Because cows are themselves bioreactors, however, the milk they yield contains no trace at all of fertilizer. On average, conventional Irish milk contains more omega 3 fatty acids and antioxidants than organic milk from Germany. The reason is the fodder; German organic farms may use only concentrates and silage as supplementary feed to increase milk output - which impacts negatively on the quality of the milk. This documentary looks at researchers who are studying potential ways of reliably distinguishing between organic and conventionally produced food. And that is no easy task. Nearly every foodstuff requires a specific test. But one thing is certain: organic farming makes a major contribution to human welfare - by helping to mitigate climate change, protect the groundwater, conserve nature and promote animal welfare. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 146825 DW Documentary
Aftermath of a genocide: Yazidis of Sinjar
 
12:01
On August 3, 2014, some 50,000 Yazidis fled the Islamic State's massacres onto Mount Sinjar. Many haven't left the mountain since then for fear of their Muslim former neighbors. Kocher and her children were held captive by the Islamic State terrorist group. They endured rape, losing their homes and being sold into slavery. Kocher's husband Mahmood joined the armed resistance against IS. Since Kocher's rescue, the family has been living on Mount Sinjar, the sacred mountain of the Yazidis. Now, they're afraid to return to their home village, knowing some of their Muslim former neighbors aided IS. The family lives in tents on the mountaintop. Three of their children are still missing. Mahmood keeps a Kalashnikov in his cabinet, just in case he has to defend himself against another attack. "It will never happen again," he says. A report by Birgitta Schülke and Sandra Petersmann. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 9720 DW Documentary
Money, happiness and eternal life - Greed (1/2) | DW Documentary
 
42:32
Can money and power ever make us happy? How much is enough? Our constant desire for more is part of our human nature. But is greed getting the better of us? Find out in GREED - A FATAL DESIRE. From Buddhists and bankers to Eskimos and psychologists, we explore the phenomenon of greed with people from all walks of life. How can it be defined? What makes us greedy? And what are the repercussions? People like to have a lot of stuff because it gives them the feeling of living forever," says American social psychologist Sheldon Solomon. He thinks we have to come to terms with our own mortality before we can break the cycle. Are there other ways to feel happy and content? Can we simply stop being greedy by changing the way we think? Watch Part 2 here: https://youtu.be/qLSt4VtmT5M Watch the extended cut here: https://youtu.be/CVuVlk2E_e4 Check out our web special: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/greed/s-32898 _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 397838 DW Documentary
From Rio to Lima – Transoceânica, the world's longest bus journey (4/5) | DW Documentary
 
42:32
From the Amazon to the Andes and all the way up to Machu Picchu, the bus continues its journey through South America on the Transoceânica highway. The mountains mark the most difficult stage of the trip for both drivers and passengers. But the passengers have a large part of the journey behind them now and it won’t be long until they reach Peru. They have crossed Brazil and driven through the Peruvian Amazon basin to the Andes. Here, the endless greenery of the basin gives way to increasingly steep rock faces. The Incas worshipped these mighty mountains as deities and called them Apus - Gods. The road takes us close to one of them: Apu Ausangate, which is 6,384 meters high. The temperature here is much lower than in the Amazon basin. The bus soon reaches Cuzco. For centuries the town was the center of the Inca Empire, until the Spaniards came and burnt it to the ground and built their own palaces on its walls. Today, the city is mainly one thing: a tourist magnet, and the starting point for tours to the legendary ruins of Machu Picchu. The complex is crumbling under the tread of millions of visitors from all over the world, and now the authorities are facing a dilemma: on the one hand, the tourists bring money; on the other the archaeologists want to preserve Machu Picchu for generations to come. Parts 1-5: Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_ODFlqURxY Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gkdt36SNc7Q Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIeq7LpfX88&t=12s Part 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sVazu3D5hY _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 53733 DW Documentary
Brides for sale - Bulgaria's Roma marriage market | DW Documentary
 
26:11
The Kalaidzhi bride market takes place in the southeast of Bulgaria every year. Unmarried women are often paired off with financially strong men. But more and more young Roma are rebelling against the old tradition. For young Kalaidzhi the annual bride market at Bachkovo Monastery is the only chance to find a partner. Their Orthodox Christian faith and traditional code of conduct prohibit them from dating, flirting or having any other pre-marital relations. The Kalaidzhi - a name meaning tinsmiths or boilermakers - marry only within the group. Finding a spouse from outside - and in particular a non-Roma Bulgarian - is out of the question. Love is only a secondary consideration. What matters is the dowry. A growing number of young Roma, however, are rebelling against the traditional marriage market. They want to make their own decisions, and to love and marry the person of their choice. For girls especially - some as young as 15 when they are put up for marriage - the wedding is the end of self-determined life. They will subsequently be housewives and mothers. The film accompanies 17-year-old Teni and 19-year-old Maria in the week before the market day. For them it means buying a lot of new clothes and masses of other preparations. Can this be a way to find true love? And how is the outdated ritual affected by the Internet and social media? _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary?sub_confirmation=1 For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 5608769 DW Documentary
One German pub owner is still serving at 87 | DW Documentary
 
12:02
At age 87, landlady Hildegard Schweinsberg is still behind the bar every day. Her pub "Zur Börse" is the heart and soul of the small village of Neuhaus. People meet here to drink, relax and catch up. What will happen if this tradition dies out? A church, a cemetery and a pub surrounded by fields and forests - the scene of a typical, idyllic German village. But it's becoming increasingly rare. Many people are moving to the cities, and in the villages there are fewer places to meet and catch up. The pub has always been an integral part of country life, and for one lucky village of 1500 people, it's still a thriving tradition. In Neuhaus on the river Elbe, Hildegard Schweinsberg has been running "Zur Börse" for nearly 60 years. And at age 87, she still can't imagine ever giving up, despite often needing a walker to serve her customers. And there's no one to take over anyway. A report by Linda Vierecke. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 13514 DW Documentary
The rich, the poor and the trash | DW Documentary
 
28:26
The gap between the rich and poor is growing. The rich consume much more than the poor and produce much more waste. Trash has become a symbol of our times. But what some people throw away, means money to others and a chance to survive. The amount of waste we generate and the way we deal with it speak volumes about our consumption and prosperity - and also about our levels of social inequality. In the documentary, "The Rich, the Poor and the Trash," co-directors Naomi Phillips and Thomas Hasel explore the lives of people both working with and living off trash. Twenty-eight-year-old Godwin Ochieng lives in Dandora, a slum in Kenya, where one of the largest dumpsites in Africa is located. He spends his days combing through endless piles of garbage coming in the truckload from the city’s wealthier districts in the hope of finding something to sell: for him, the mountain of trash is a lifeline. One person who tries to help youths in the slum is Godwin Ochieng's role model, hip-hop star Juliani, who also comes from Dandora. The founder of the youth club wants to radically change Kenyan society. Meanwhile, halfway around the globe in one of the world’s richest and most expensive cities, Pierre Simmons searches the streets of New York for cans he can sell to recycling companies. In 2014, Pierre Simmons gave a speech about poverty to the United Nations on behalf of “Sure we can”, a non-profit recycling center in New York. “I don't think anybody here at Sure We Can wants to live like Wall Street people,” says Pierre. Both men live in countries where the gap between rich and poor is vast. But the social gap between the US and Kenya is also huge. Economists Lucas Chancel and Kate Raworth warn against the consequences of a huge imbalance at both the national and international levels. They believe it poses a great danger to our entire system of values in the West, to our understanding of democracy and, ultimately, to our economy. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 504547 DW Documentary
Fakes in the art world - The mystery conman | DW Documentary
 
42:32
Fake art sits unnoticed in galleries around the world. A talented fraudster has been playing the art market and ripping off collectors for years. Who is the mystery conman? Discover more in THE MYSTERY CONMAN - THE MURKY BUSINESS OF COUNTERFEIT ANTIQUES. Museum curators and art collectors want to sweep the topic of counterfeiting under the carpet. But archaeologist Stefan Lehmann is on the hunt for the elusive figure whose counterfeit antiques are in some of the world's biggest collections. Around 40 fakes have been discovered and Lehmann believes this is just the tip of the iceberg. Alongside antique dealer Christoph Leon, Lehmann follows the forgery trail through Europe and to the US. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 178743 DW Documentary
Is tourism harming Venice? | DW Documentary
 
42:26
Venice is threatened by mass tourism. Some 30 million visitors a year come to the city in Italy, making their way through the narrow streets. With an infrastructure more and more tailored to the needs of tourism, the city’s remaining residents feel left behind. During high season an influx of up to 130 thousand tourists a day means the city authorities have scant resources to cater for the more mundane needs of residents. A constant flotilla of small boats ferry passengers between city landing stages and giant cruise liners moored in the lagoon. Air quality in Venice is often worse than busy city centers. Within the last generation the number of residents has dropped by nearly a third. The Rialto Bridge and St Mark’s Square have become the main attractions in this Venetian Theme park providing locals with jobs in the tourist sector, but little else. Rents are sky high, Airbnb rules the roost. More and more historical buildings have been taken over by hotels. Shops, bars and restaurant cater almost exclusively to tourists. But residents are fighting back and now there are over 30 local initiatives trying to stem the tides of mass tourism. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 102121 DW Documentary
The people, history and culture of Uzbekistan - Traveling the Silk Road | DW Documentary
 
42:31
With its magical buildings, fascinating landscapes and friendly people, Uzbekistan has a lot to offer. It is a country caught between rich traditions and modernity. Wild equestrian games, fairytale palaces and hospitable people proud of their magnificent culture - all this will be encountered by those traveling through Uzbekistan on the Silk Road. The central Asian country borders Kazakhstan to the north and Afghanistan to the south. The journey begins in Samarkand, one of central Asia’s oldest cities. For centuries cities like Samarkand, Bukhara and Khiva provided the necessary infrastructure for the caravans on the Silk Road, allowing merchants to trade their goods and providing accommodation for them and their animals. Many buildings still survive to underline the splendor and wealth that trade once generated. In Samarkand, one of the world’s oldest cities, three outstanding Koran schools, known as madrasas, on Registan Square have been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. In the Boysun region in the Hissar Mountains the ancient, and none-too-gentle riding game known as Kopkari is held at Nowruz, the New Year festival. More than a hundred horsemen try to pick up the body of a dead goat from the ground and to escape with this from all the others. In 1380 the Uzbek folk hero Amir Timur (Tamerlane) had the gigantic Ak Sarav, the White Palace, built in Shahrisabz, the town of his birth. It had a thousand rooms adorned with gemstones. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 584975 DW Documentary
From Rio to Lima – Transoceânica, the world's longest bus journey (1/5) | DW Documentary
 
42:30
From Brazil’s Rio de Janeiro to Lima, Peru, the world’s longest bus ride takes 100 hours and spans 6,300 kilometers. Hop aboard for an unforgettable journey along the South America’s Transoceânica highway! The first leg of the journey starts on the Atlantic shore, exploring the Costa Verde, one of the most beautiful coastlines in the country. But it’s not long until the bus crosses into Mato Grasso, the agricultural heart of Brazil, where soy fields and sugar cane plantations dominate the landscape. The region is also the home of the rodeo, a regular event in the villages along the Transoceânica route. We even find female rodeo riders here in spite of all the cultural prejudices. Parts 2-5: Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gkdt36SNc7Q Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIeq7LpfX88&t=12s Part 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vbAoM23sK7o&t=46s Part 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sVazu3D5hY _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 201611 DW Documentary
The fight for the Arctic | DW Documentary
 
26:20
The Arctic ice is retreating due to climate change. The region’s once inaccessible raw materials have caught the attention of major world powers. Countries like the USA, Russia and China are positioning themselves, scouting out the land and securing the best sites for getting their hands on the raw materials. The animals of the Arctic are also having to fight - for their survival. Russia already has an ultra-modern nuclear-powered icebreaker in operation. The Norwegian company Statoil is conducting test drilling with its cutting-edge rig "Songa Enabler," which was designed especially for the Arctic; it’s the most northerly drilling operation in the world. Norway hopes to discover vast natural wealth in the Arctic. But the borders in the Arctic have not yet been set, and a war over resources is always a distinct danger. For the animals of the Arctic, including seals and polar bears, the melting sea ice is also having drastic consequences. They’re losing their habitats and their search for food is becoming increasingly difficult. In addition, the rubbish that is piling up in the Arctic only degrades very slowly and it’s poisoning the animals. Seabirds and whales are dying because they can’t digest the plastic in their stomachs. International fishing fleets are the main culprits when it comes to rubbish in the Arctic. The ice used to be a natural barrier. Now the trawlers can penetrate further and further into the icy ocean and, as a result, catch greater quantities of fish. Overfishing is almost inevitable. Furthermore the huge trawl nets used by the industrial fishing fleets are destroying the ocean floor, an important habitat. For years, environmental organizations such as Greenpeace have been complaining about the problems caused by fishing and raw-material exploitation in the Arctic. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 43195 DW Documentary
How to survive in Los Angeles - without a home? | DW Documentary
 
12:02
California's economy is booming. Yet, there are tens of thousands of people living on the streets and not benefitting at all. There are as many homeless people in Greater Los Angeles as in the whole of Germany. Michael J. Diehl is one of them. The Texan-born Michael J. Diehl, aka MJ, has lived in a tent in California for four years. Instead of an apartment, he has a guitar and a dog. He used to be a deep sea diver in the Gulf of Mexico, working on oil rigs and pipelines and earning thousands of dollars. Then he was shot in the head. The bullet is still there today. As a consequence, he lost his health, his work, his family and his home. Now, years later, he has created another family and home for himself on the banks of the Santa Ana River. But the local authorities are threatening to move them on. MJ and many others are ready to put up a fight. _______ Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 398082 DW Documentary
Trash into cash - plastic waste in Haiti | DW Documentary
 
12:01
Richardson Gustave works for an unusual project called "The Plastic Bank," which wants to protect the environment and help people escape poverty. Plastic waste is a growing problem worldwide. The oceans are awash in garbage, causing the deaths of marine animals. Traces of plastics are turning up in our bloodstreams, too. The problems created by plastic waste are especially visible in Haiti. Many people here live in poverty and amid plastic waste. "The Plastic Bank" pays people to collect waste in order to reduce pollution and poverty. The waste is then sold for recycling. Richardson Gustave set up the project to help rebuild his country that was devastated by hurricanes in 2008. It's not easy to implement it in reality. Turning Waste into Opportunity: The Plastic Pickers of Haiti - A Report by Sabine Streich _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 16548 DW Documentary
The mule women of Melilla on the border of Spain and Morocco | DW Documentary
 
26:10
The Spanish semi-enclave of Melilla lives from the trade of second-hand goods. On the shoulders of Moroccan women, goods cross Europe's southernmost border. It’s a lucrative business for the traders, but inhumane work for the carriers. Europe's southernmost border runs around Melilla on North Africa’s Mediterranean coast. The city of Melilla and sister city Ceuta both share a border with Morocco and attract traders and workers who cross the border every day to earn a living. For centuries Melilla, which separates Spain from Morocco, was a Spanish colony on African soil. After Morocco gained independence Melilla remained Spanish, but even today the enclave is not recognized by the Kingdom of Morocco. Moroccan citizens can take parcels weighing up to 70 kilos through the Barrio Chino border crossing as duty-free "hand luggage" almost unchecked. Melilla is part of Spain, but doesn’t belong to the European Customs Union. The duty-free transport of goods is actually illegal, but it is tolerated as long as only hand luggage is involved - irrespective of the weight. Nora El Koukhou is one of the human mules who cart the heavy goods across the border between Spain and Morocco on their backs or on skateboards. As long as the goods are in contact with their bodies, they remain tax and duty-free. It’s a perfidious but very lucrative business for the traders and one of Melilla’s most important sources of income. But the workers - including more and more young people, as well as the old and the sick - hardly profit from this at all. They work under precarious conditions, and if the border crossings close unexpectedly early, goods traffic backs up. Carriers like Nora struggle to survive, and merchants like Mohammed Abdelkader are stuck with their goods. At the interface between Africa and Europe, the fences are getting higher and higher, but the police cannot stop the informal trade in Melilla. The border patrol force monitors the goods traffic on the border between Spain and Morocco. The documentary follows Moroccan "mule" Nora to the Barrio Chino crossing and observes the complex schemes taking place on Europe's southernmost border. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary?sub_confirmation=1 For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 196497 DW Documentary
The Germans - Luther and the nation | DW Documentary
 
42:26
How did Martin Luther, a simple monk, become a key figure in history in the 15th century? Luther managed to unite and divide Germans. Martin Luther started out as a simple monk, a doubting theologian in constant conflict with himself. But he became an epochal figure, both uniting and dividing the Germans and splitting the Roman Catholic Church without actually intending to. "The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation" had been the name of the state at the heart of Europe since the late 15th century. It was the era of the Habsburg Emperor Charles V, who, according to ancient tradition, saw himself as a ruler by God's grace and defender of Christian unity. The sun did not set on his empire, he said in 1521 - it stretched from Latin America to Central Europe to the Philippines. The German territories formed only one of many kingdoms, and powerful electors defended their own interests there. Secular and spiritual power at that time was still based on Roman Christianity. But be they princes or estates, peasants or city dwellers: during the Reformation, many sensed an opportunity to distance themselves from Rome and the Emperor and to bolster their status within the power structures of their day. Unlike Charles V, who did not even speak German, many identified with Luther, who became extremely popular. The reformer was one of the first to explicitly play the German card and appeal to national sentiment: "How would the Germans put up with robbery and oppression from strangers?" he wrote in one tract. Luther’s translation of the Bible into German spread the language and laid the foundations of a growing German identity. People should be able to enjoy "being spoken to in German," he said. But the religious conflict led to a military one. To restore peace, it was decided that each sovereign could decide for or against the Reformation according to the formula "Cuius regio, eius religio" ("Whose realm, his religion"). The Peace of Augsburg in 1555 strengthened the independence of the princes. But the Germans remained divided in faith. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 50427 DW Documentary
Toiling in paradise: seasonal work in Santorini | DW Documentary
 
26:05
Where others go on holiday, seasonal workers toil under substandard conditions. Santorini may be great for a holiday but it’s a daily challenge for porters. Every year, millions of tourists travel to the Greek island of Santorini with its spectacular crater rim. Honeymooners and luxury holidaymakers pay up to €1,000 a night - that's how much a waiter or porter makes per month. It is grueling work, carried out in the searing heat of the beautiful town of Oia. But hopes for a better future make the seasonal workers there ready to put up with a lot. The beautiful cliffs of Santorini may be an idyllic holiday setting but it’s a daily challenge for porters: 146 steps up and down, many times a day. Some of the cases weigh up to 30 kilograms. At night, one Bulgarian porter can barely sleep from pain. Physically ruined, he wonders whether he will live to see his 60th birthday. For a long time, he concealed his job as a porter from his young daughter, dreaming that he would one day have his own supermarket in Bulgaria. Finally to be his own master and a worthy father to his daughter! In the evening, tourist flock to the pool bar to watch the sunset. The bartender, also from Bulgaria, must mix up to 400 drinks for the daily rush hour in record time. The stress isn’t just physical but also mental. He works up to 14 hours a day, which leaves no time for a personal life. He has been coming to Santorini for the past nine years and has worked his way up from bellhop to barman. He wants to stick it out for at least eight more years because he dreams of owning a hotel in his home country, where his hard-earned euros are worth four times as much as they are in Greece. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 66828 DW Documentary
German food banks under pressure | DW Documentary
 
12:02
The food bank in northwestern Essen has temporarily stopped taking on any new non-German customers. Those in need must increasingly rely on donations. The decision sparked outrage across the country: The food bank in northwestern Essen – also the German word for “food” - has temporarily stopped taking on new customers who aren't German. Many politicians, including Chancellor Merkel, have voiced criticism. The case reveals the enormous strain on food banks to spread dwindling contributions among the rising number of those in need. Our report follows helpers in Cologne who are determined not to be like their colleagues in Essen. _______ Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary?sub_confirmation=1 For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 14761 DW Documentary
Secrets of the Stone Age (2/2) | DW Documentary
 
42:26
How were our Stone Age ancestors capable of building gigantic structures like burial mounds and stone rings? An insight into the history of humankind. Watch Part 1 here: https://youtu.be/I2vYr6gx56o Around 12,000 years ago, humans underwent a transition from the mobile lifestyle of hunter-gatherers to the settled life of farmers. That epoch, the Stone Age, produced monumental building works. How did our ancestors live and build back then? Part 2 of this two-part documentary takes us to unique archaeological sites in Scotland, Brittany, Austria, Malta, Turkey and Jordan. The gigantic stone circles, temples and tombs from the Stone Age beg the question not only as to why this effort was made, but also of how, given the technical possibilities of the time, our ancestors were capable of building structures like the Barnenez burial mound or the stone ring of Orkney. How many people did they need to transport a 20-ton stone? A team led by experimental archaeologist Wolfgang Lobisser carries out a test with a wooden sledge and a two-ton stone block. The Neolithic seems to have been a fairly peaceful era; at least, no artifacts indicating military conflicts have been found so far. Raids and attacks that wiped out entire villages have only been confirmed for the later Bronze Age. But the foundations of many disputes were laid back then. In addition to cult objects, the Neolithic also saw the development of the first trading systems. "The people of the Neolithic were the first to become really dependent on material goods," says Marion Benz from the University of Freiburg, pointing to wafer-thin sandstone rings that researchers have found in large numbers in the Neolithic village of Ba'ja in Jordan. We need to know about prehistory in order to understand the present. Population explosion, consumerism and megacities are ultimately the heritage of the Neolithic period, when sedentary societies first appeared. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 75300 DW Documentary
Winter light for an Italian village | DW Documentary
 
05:15
Villages in Italy are not usually short of sunlight. But Viganella in Piedmont lies at the bottom of a deep valley. Deep winter means little sunshine. But a giant mirror is bringing more light back to the town square. _______ Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 13425 DW Documentary
The deceptive promise of free trade | DW Documentary
 
42:26
Global trade is a hot topic of the G7 summit in Canada. Is free trade truly free - and fair? What roles do US President Trump, economic powerhouse China, and the EU play in global trade? When it comes to global trade, it would seem that trickery, threats and deception are the order of the day - yet all this takes place largely beyond the reach of the public eye. Donald Trump has made "America First” his agenda and rallying cry. Along with aiming sharp criticism at global export champion Germany, Trump has also introduced punitive tariffs and warned of further measures. Will this fresh wave of protectionism lead to economic isolationism and threaten global free trade? And what about those for whom free trade’s promise of prosperity increasingly rings hollow? Around the world, many people have come to regard themselves as the losers of globalization. If the true winners of free trade and globalization are not ordinary citizens, has the time come to revise the liberal orthodoxy of free trade? This documentary visits Germany, Switzerland, the United States and Cameroon to explore these issues by way of some everyday examples, including the trade in onions, floor tiles, and bicycles. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 475787 DW Documentary
Land grabbing in Romania | DW Documentary
 
25:56
"Land grabbing" in Romania is a problem. Large areas of arable land are falling into the hands of major foreign investors, at the expense of local people. So-called land grabbing, buying up large areas of agricultural land, is no longer just a phenomenon in Africa or Latin America - it is a topic around the world. Countries in Eastern Europe are also increasingly affected. The documentary looks at the people affected by large-scale land acquisitions. A change to the law in 2014 has made Romania’s pastures and arable land highly attractive to foreign investors, from Europe and around the world. Buying agricultural land brings in big EU farming subsidies. And when farming no longer pays off for domestic smallholders, they feel forced to sell their holdings. It’s turned into a kind of mass fire sale. But in many cases of land grabbing, the land isn’t used for agricultural purposes. Pasture and arable land is left fallow, or it goes into private ownership. And local farmers and people are paying a heavy price. Monoculture is destroying biodiversity and cheap agricultural products from abroad are wrecking the country’s domestic markets. The land is being pulled from under the feet of an entire generation of Romanian farmers. But a group is keen to mobilize Romania's five million small-scale farmers to oppose land grabbing in the country. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/dwdocumentary?sub_confirmation=1 For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 142360 DW Documentary
Beauty in the stars - astrotourism | DW Documentary
 
42:26
Beautiful night skies are hard to find these days, largely because of pollution. In Europe, Spain has become a favorite among so-called astro-tourists. The stars have influenced human culture, religion and science for millennia. Yet increasing light pollution in capital cities and urban agglomerations has made it next to impossible to observe the night sky in many places. The majority of people in Europe are affected by this relatively new form of pollution. Those who do want to gaze at the stars often find that their best bet is Spain, which is attracting visitors from all over the world for this very reason. The night sky has become a cultural resource in the 21st century, making it an economic factor that may possibly even contribute to sustainable development. Our documentary ‘Astro-Tourism – Feeling the Universe’ takes us closer to the stars with spectacular images of the heavens. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 5743 DW Documentary
Eva Braun (1/2) - life and death with Adolf Hitler | DW Documentary
 
42:26
Eva Braun was Adolf Hitler's secret mistress for more than 13 years. But who was the woman at Hitler’s side until the very end? [Online until: 18.08.2018] To this day she is viewed as a naïve, apolitical appendage to the Nazi dictator and mass murderer. She only became publicly known after her death in 1945, when she and Hitler committed suicide in a bunker in Berlin. This two-part documentary calls into question the image of the vapid young woman at the Führer's side. Eva Braun met Hitler in 1929 and became his lover when she was just 17 years old. During the years of their relationship, she evolved from an average middle class girl to the uncompromising partner of the mass murderer. She remained true to Hitler until death. On 30 April 1945 Hitler and Eva Braun committed suicide in the bunker beneath the Reich Chancellery in Berlin. A day earlier, the dictator had married her. But who was this 'bride of evil' really? Hitler's architect Albert Speer referred to her after the war as one of the "disappointments of history". Kept out of the public eye, she spent most of her time in Munich or at Hitler's Berghof residence in the Alps. There she lived officially as the dictator's private secretary. Historian Heike Görtemaker has tracked down and assembled the puzzle pieces of Eva Braun's life in a groundbreaking biography. Behind the assumed gaiety, the author finds a resolute woman who pursued her goals with tremendous toughness right up to her death. For this documentary, filmmaker Michael Kloft conducted detailed interviews with Görtemaker and evaluated the many private films made by Eva Braun as well as the countless photo albums she compiled. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 183525 DW Documentary
Designer babies | DW Documentary
 
42:26
Health, gender, eye color – the designer baby is already a reality. But what are the moral, ethical and legal questions being raised? [Online until: 23.08.2018] In vitro fertilization (IVF) and the potential creation of artificial egg and sperm cells are posing a fundamental challenge to human reproduction. In 1978 the world was shocked by the birth of Louise Brown, the first test-tube baby. Four decades later, the once controversial technique of IVF has long become normality. But genetic science has made so many advances in recent years that there are now many more ways of tweaking nature: genetic health, gender, eye color - designer babies no far-off futuristic vision. Would-be parents from all over the world can travel to the United States, where - for a suitable fee - they can order their dream child. But it's not only in America that technological progress seems to be unstoppable. In 2015, the British parliament gave the green light to what's called three-parent babies. This technique replaces genetic material from mothers with defective mitochondrial DNA with DNA from a donor. And the discovery of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing has opened up hitherto unthinkable possibilities; with this technology the genes of an embryo can be altered before it is implanted in the mother's womb. This may be reminiscent of science fiction films like "Gattaca," but it was actually carried out on a human embryo in 2016. These revolutionary new techniques raise hopes of correcting genetic defects and overcoming hereditary disorders. But they also raise uncomfortable questions: What makes a human being worthy of life? What does it mean - morally, ethically and legally - when ever more efficient methods bring us closer to eugenics? This highly profitable side of the baby business in a growing global market shows that answers to these questions need to be found - and fast. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 99026 DW Documentary
By train across Sri Lanka | DW Documentary
 
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Asia’s most beautiful railway line? The “Main Line” cuts through tea plantations and jungle, then passes Buddhist temples and relicts of the British Empire. In the 19th century the British built a railway in what was then their colony of Ceylon. Their idea was to transport goods such as tea from the highlands to the port of Colombo. Today it’s mainly only locals and tourists who use the so-called "Main Line." The route is considered one of the most picturesque in the whole of Asia. Our trip takes us from the capital, Colombo, to Ella in the highlands. Our first stop is one of the country’s largest elephant orphanages. And then on to Kandy, the former capital of the Singhalese kingdom. The city is home to the famous Temple of the Tooth, which is said to house the Buddha’s top left canine. The train then winds its way further up into the highlands. We watch tea pickers at work and go to a tea factory to discover where the aroma comes from. Nuwara Eliya is Sri Lanka’s highest town at an altitude of almost 1900 meters, where a racecourse still brings the colonial era back to life. The stations have also retained their own colonial charm: in 1901, a signaling system was set up to make the long journey safer. And those suffering from the altitude can catch their breath at the final stop, the spa in Ella. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 1594670 DW Documentary
The mysterious world under the skin | DW Documentary
 
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Under the skin, the human body has a connective tissue called fascia that contains muscles and nerves. But what does the fascia do? [Online until: 21.08.2018] What is the real role of this whole-body network? Is it a starting point for new therapies and cures -for one of the world's most widespread disorders, back pain, for example? This documentary presents the latest scientific findings by international researchers and provides some surprising insights. For a long time, the fascia was viewed as an insignificant sheathing membrane that was ignored by surgeons and excised by anatomists. Today we know that this connective tissue envelops the human body like a second skin and weaves around all its internal organs, including the blood vessels and the brain. The fascia has even been described as a gigantic pain-related organ in its own right. Everyone seems to be talking about this mysterious fabric. Fascia - hype or a source of ground-breaking findings and new forms of therapy? Renowned researchers all over the world are addressing this question. In Padua, Italy, Carla Stecco has revolutionized the world of anatomy with her "Functional Atlas of the Human Fascial System.” She dissects the dorsal fascia, which is seen by some as the origin of chronic back pain. American fascia pioneer Thomas Myers, author of "Anatomy Trains,” provides insights into the huge whole-body network that stabilizes and maintains structural integrity. Robert Schleip, a leading German researcher, shows the effect that too little movement can have on the highly sensitive fascial tissue. And researcher Helene Langevin in Boston demonstrates the role of fascia in the ancient healing art of acupuncture. All these scientists have come to the conclusion that this fibrous connective tissue is not only the origin of pain and disorders, but also a starting point for new approaches to healing. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 87289 DW Documentary
Visiting North Korea | DW Documentary
 
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Few tourists manage to peek behind the iron curtain of North Korea's dictatorship. But the journalist Luca Faccio managed to visit Kim Jong Un's regime. Anyone venturing behind the world’s last Iron Curtain into North Korea will experience a very different country to the one we know only through the usual images of rocket launches and mass rallies. The country is ruled by the dictator Kim Jong Un, whom the people worship - or are made to worship - as a god-like father figure. Little is known about daily life in North Korea, because all images that reach the outside world have been censored by the government. Visitors rarely see evidence of oppression, enforced conformity and starvation in the rural population. Still, journalist Luca Faccio is able to offer some interesting insights into the isolated country - although, of course, government watchdogs are on his heels everywhere he goes. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 1135725 DW Documentary
Asian street food | DW Documentary
 
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Asia’s street food delicacies are world-famous. From scorpions to insects, every region has its specialty. Street food isn’t just cuisine – it’s a part of cultural identity. Food trucks and street vendors all have a story to tell. And to explore Asian street food is to learn about a society and its culture, history and politics. Travel across four Asian countries and explore the diversity of the street food tradition, from the staples served up for tourists to the secrets of Xinjiang cuisine. But it’s not just about the food; cooking can be an escape from poverty. Saiyuud Diwong, who grew up in the slums of Bangkok, now rubs shoulders with the likes of Jamie Oliver. She’s also published a book and runs a cookery school. At a bazaar in Xinjiang, at the heart of the Silk Road, we meet Alimu, whose specialty is lamb kebabs. And we visit Japan, to see how a classic ramen noodle soup is made. _______ Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: https://www.dw.com/documentaries Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories
Views: 345613 DW Documentary