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Douglas Rushkoff: "Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus" | Talks at Google
 
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The digital economy has gone wrong. Everybody knows it, but no one knows quite how to fix it, or even how to explain the problem. Workers lose to automation, investors lose to algorithms, musicians lose to power law dynamics, drivers lose to Uber, neighborhoods lose to Airbnb, and even tech developers lose their visions to the demands of the startup economy. Douglas Rushkoff argues that it doesn't have to be this way. This isn't the fault of digital technology at all, but the way we are deploying it: instead of building the distributed digital economy these new networks could foster, we are doubling down on the industrial age mandate for growth above all. As Rushkoff will show, this is more the legacy of early corporatism and central currency than a feature of digital technology. In his words, "we are running a 21st century digital economy on a 13th Century printing-press era operating system." Here's how we went wrong, why we did it, and how we can reprogram the digital economy and our businesses from the inside out to promote sustainable prosperity for pretty much everyone. Get the book here: https://goo.gl/UuhiAi
Views: 9330 Talks at Google
Origins of the Military-Industrial Complex
 
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Daniel Else explored the results of his year-long inquiry into the organizational underpinnings of that military technological revolution of the 1940s and 1950s. By mining the Library's resources, Else traced the evolving relationship between science and the federal government leading to the creation of the Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) in 1941. A temporary wartime agency, OSRD mobilized the nation's academic and industrial technological resources in support of the war effort, and in so doing profoundly altered the linkages between science and engineering, industry, and government. Else explored those wartime changes and outline their impact, still seen and felt today more than seven decades after V-J Day. Speaker Biography: Daniel Else was a specialist in national defense in the Congressional Research Service in the Library of Congress and the 2016 Kluge Staff Fellow at the Library's John W. Kluge Center. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=8278
Views: 1755 LibraryOfCongress
JFK to 9/11 - Everything Is A Rich Man's Trick
 
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Everything Is A Rich Man's Trick
Views: 250 Bill Cutting
12. French Imperialism (Guest Lecture by Charles Keith)
 
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France Since 1871 (HIST 276) France's colonial properties were thought of in the latter half of the nineteenth century as consolation for the bitter loss of Alsace and Lorraine to Germany. As civilian administrators came to replace military personnel in the colonies, and as more and more French settlers arrived, empire and colonialism came to play an important function in France's cultural self-presentation. World War I heralded the eventual decline of the French empire, a decline realized at the hands of the colonized subjects themselves. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Explosion of French Imperialism: Reasserting National Greatness after Alsace-Lorraine 07:18 - Chapter 2. The Drive for Empire: External Relief for Internal Instability 12:23 - Chapter 3. Rise of the Colonial Lobby 18:02 - Chapter 4. The Empire in Popular Culture 26:43 - Chapter 5. From Military to Administrative Occupation: Regularization in the Empire 36:06 - Chapter 6. Lives of the Conquered: The Indigenous Perspective and the Rise of Anti-Colonialism 40:35 - Chapter 7. The First World War and the Decline of French Empire Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2007.
Views: 46428 YaleCourses
15. Tropical Medicine as a Discipline
 
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Epidemics in Western Society Since 1600 (HIST 234) The sub-discipline of tropical medicine furnishes a clear example of the socially constructed character of medical knowledge. Tropical diseases first enter medical discourse as a unique conceptual field and topic for specialization at the end of the 19th century, and the heyday of tropical medicine - from the 1890s to the First World War - corresponds to the golden age of Western colonialism in Africa and Asia. This correspondence was not accidental; tropical medicine both gave practical aid to colonial powers faced with unfamiliar disease environments and furnished a deeply Eurocentric view of disease well-suited to the ideology of colonial expansion. As a consequence of this approach, little attention was given to the social factors of disease (work conditions, poverty, malnutrition), and the health of native populations was largely ignored. Subsequent periods of research in tropical medicine have, with decolonization and infusions of money from American foundations, been obliged to confront the consequences stemming from the discipline's formation as an instrument of colonial subjugation. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Tropical Medicine 05:48 - Chapter 2. Background: Diseases of the Tropics 11:53 - Chapter 3. Transition to Tropical Diseases and Tropical Medicine: Medical Factors 31:09 - Chapter 4. Institutional Factors 34:15 - Chapter 5. Implications of Tropical Medicine Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2010.
Views: 8015 YaleCourses
Class 13 Reading Marx's Capital Vol I with David Harvey
 
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Class 13 Conclusion. An open course consisting of a close reading of the text of Marx's Capital Volume I in 13 video lectures by Professor David Harvey.
Buckminster Fuller at MIT - Spaceship Earth - 1979
 
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The Assyrian Legacy in the Cradle of Civilization
 
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Amir Harrak from the University of Toronto presented "The Neo-Assyrian Winged Bulls and their Origins." Christopher Woods from the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago discussed Mesopotamian literature in general and the preservation of the Gilgamesh Epic. Simo Parpola from the University of Helsinki discussed Assyria after the collapse of the Empire and the impact of Assyrian statecraft, religion and visual arts on the ancient and modern world. First of three sessions in a daylong symposium. Speaker Biography: Amir Harrak is an associate professor in the University of Toronto's department of Near and Middle Eastern civilizations. Speaker Biography: Christopher Woods is an associate professor of Sumerian at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. Speaker Biography: Simo Parpol is a professor emeritus of Assyriology at the University of Helsinki. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7670
Views: 957 LibraryOfCongress
Yelawolf - Johnny Cash
 
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Get Yelawolf's "Love Story" - http://smarturl.it/YelaLoveStory Sign up for updates: http://smarturl.it/Yelawolf.News Music video by Yelawolf performing Johnny Cash. (C) 2015 Interscope Records http://www.vevo.com/watch/USUV71400880 Best of Yelawolf: https://goo.gl/vy7NZQ Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/ynkVDL
Views: 10565160 YelawolfVEVO
Call of Duty FULL STORYLINE Explained! | Zombie Story Revealed Theory V4
 
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It is finally here ! This is the most up to date story line that is accepted by the community at large. Based off in game facts, radios, and treyarch's word we compiled it all into one short video for a complex story. We tried our best to shorten radios because we don't want to waist people's time, but this is meant for the person who has NO idea about call of duty zombies. This gives them all the information they need to know! This is the bare minimum to understand the story in zombies. It's meant to cover why everything is happening. That's what we aimed to do with this video. I made sure to close caption everything so be sure to use that feature! Finally we all understand that with black ops 3 this thoery will be broken down. This is a last wrap up before zombies comes out in a few months. Check out jordan's channel here: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheJFKGamer ►Get Posters and T-Shirts Here!! https://radcompany.squarespace.com ~Keep up with my social media below~ ►My other channel http://www.youtube.com/RADPLAYS ►Twitter- https://twitter.com/#!/RADAUSTIN27 ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RADAUSTINS27 ►Stream: http://www.twitch.tv/radaustin27 ►My sub-reddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/RADAUSTIN27/ ~The songs used in most of my videos (if applicable) Songs~ ►Outro: Ahrix - Raising - Copyright Free Music ►If monstercat music was used: Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/MonstercatMedia Song: ~Great Playlists on my Channel~ ►Easter Egg Series: http://tinyurl.com/na4qwyh ►Top 5 Countdowns: http://tinyurl.com/p4v8hry ►Let's Explore: http://tinyurl.com/opm9uu5&index=1 ►Zombie Theories: http://tinyurl.com/qzhscko
Views: 167879 RADAUSTIN27
Aboriginal Title and Provincial Regulation: The Impact of Tsilhqot'in Nation v BC
 
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In partnership with the Centre for Global Studies and the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance, UVic Law presents this two-hour panel discussion and Continuing Legal Education (CLE) course on this case of national significance. Panelists include: Jay Nelson (General Counsel to the Tsilhqot'in Nation, Associate Counsel at Woodward & Company), Krista Robertson (Lawyer at JFK Law Corporation with expertise in Aboriginal Rights Law) and Dr. John Borrows (Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria).
Views: 6405 UVic Law
Have the Mountains Fallen? Two Journeys of Loss & Redemption in the Cold War
 
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Author Jeffery B. Lilley presents "Have the Mountains Fallen: Two Journeys of Loss and Redemption in the Cold War," co-sponsored by the Embassy of the Kyrgyz Republic. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=8393
Views: 62 LibraryOfCongress
Does the Left Have a Future? | Michael Kazin || Radcliffe Institute
 
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Does the Left Have a Future? 2017–2018 Dean's Lecture in the Social Sciences Nearly everywhere in Europe and the United States, the left is mired in crisis: its intellectuals and activists strike defensive poses and debate how to revive the fortunes of a cause whose adherents once believed they could and would shape the future. Michael Kazin, a professor of history at Georgetown University and expert in US politics and social movements of the 19th and 20th centuries, discusses how this crisis occurred and reflects on how the left—both radical and liberal—might move forward again. Introduced by Lizabeth Cohen, dean, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences This is a 2017–2018 Kim and Judy Davis Dean's Lecture. For information about the Radcliffe Institute and its many public programs, visit https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/.
Views: 2844 Harvard University
Racism in America: Small Town 1950s Case Study Documentary Film
 
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Racism in the United States has been a major issue since the colonial era and the slave era. Legally sanctioned racism imposed a heavy burden on Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latin Americans. European Americans (particularly Anglo Americans) were privileged by law in matters of literacy, immigration, voting rights, citizenship, land acquisition, and criminal procedure over periods of time extending from the 17th century to the 1960s. Many non-Protestant European immigrant groups, particularly American Jews, Irish Americans, Italian Americans, as well as other immigrants from elsewhere, suffered xenophobic exclusion and other forms of discrimination in American society. Major racially structured institutions included slavery, Indian Wars, Native American reservations, segregation, residential schools (for Native Americans), and internment camps. Formal racial discrimination was largely banned in the mid-20th century, and came to be perceived as socially unacceptable and/or morally repugnant as well, yet racial politics remain a major phenomenon. Historical racism continues to be reflected in socio-economic inequality. Racial stratification continues to occur in employment, housing, education, lending, and government. The 20th century saw a hardening of institutionalized racism and legal discrimination against citizens of African descent in the United States. Although technically able to vote, poll taxes, acts of terror (often perpetuated by groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, founded in the Reconstruction South), and discriminatory laws such as grandfather clauses kept black Americans disenfranchised particularly in the South but also nationwide following the Hayes election at the end of the Reconstruction era in 1877. In response to de jure racism, protest and lobbyist groups emerged, most notably, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) in 1909. This time period is sometimes referred to as the nadir of American race relations because racism in the United States was worse during this time than at any period before or since. Segregation, racial discrimination, and expressions of white supremacy all increased. So did anti-black violence, including lynchings and race riots. In addition, racism which had been viewed primarily as a problem in the Southern states, burst onto the national consciousness following the Great Migration, the relocation of millions of African Americans from their roots in the Southern states to the industrial centers of the North after World War I, particularly in cities such as Boston, Chicago, and New York (Harlem). In northern cities, racial tensions exploded, most violently in Chicago, and lynchings--mob-directed hangings, usually racially motivated—increased dramatically in the 1920s. As a member of the Princeton chapter of the NAACP, Albert Einstein corresponded with W. E. B. Du Bois, and in 1946 Einstein called racism America's "worst disease." The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965. They mandated "separate but equal" status for black Americans. In reality, this led to treatment and accommodations that were almost always inferior to those provided to white Americans. The most important laws required that public schools, public places and public transportation, like trains and buses, have separate facilities for whites and blacks. (These Jim Crow Laws were separate from the 1800-66 Black Codes, which had restricted the civil rights and civil liberties of African Americans.) State-sponsored school segregation was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1954 in Brown v. Board of Education. Generally, the remaining Jim Crow laws were overruled by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act; none were in effect at the end of the 1960s. Segregation continued even after the demise of the Jim Crow laws. Data on house prices and attitudes toward integration from suggest that in the mid-20th century, segregation was a product of collective actions taken by whites to exclude blacks from their neighborhoods. Segregation also took the form of redlining, the practice of denying or increasing the cost of services, such as banking, insurance, access to jobs, access to health care, or even supermarkets to residents in certain, often racially determined, areas. Although in the United States informal discrimination and segregation have always existed, the practice called "redlining" began with the National Housing Act of 1934, which established the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racism_in_America
Views: 536742 Way Back
First Nation's Treaty History in B.C., Canada
 
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This was broadcasted in the 90's and gives us a timeless understanding of the challenges First Nations have faced in Canada. There are some scenes of great radio host and sadly missed Jack Webster (resident on Saltspring), interviewing a First Nations hero Frank Calder.
Views: 12441 saltspringpictures
ch 10) The Other Civil War
 
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chapter 10: A People's History (Of The United States) Howard Zinn. ~ Chapter 10, "The Other Civil War", covers the Anti-Rent movement, the Dorr Rebellion, the Flour Riot of 1837, the Molly Maguires, the rise of labor unions, the Lowell girls movement, and other class struggles centered around the various depressions of the 19th century. He describes the abuse of government power by corporations and the efforts by workers to resist those abuses.
Views: 7343 andi burridge
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 1 - System of Wellness
 
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Dr. Evan Adams (Smoke Signals) narrates Implementing the Vision: BC First Nations Health Governance, an evocative documentary explaining issues in First Nations health and the efforts to address them. The film describes the plan by BC First Nations, in partnership with federal and provincial governments, to change health care systems in British Columbia. Told in four parts, the film uses interviews in a story-telling approach to a complex and fascinating history and the move to improve First Nations health that is unfolding in BC today.
Views: 11033 fnhealthcouncil
What is Climate Change and What Can We Do About It?
 
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CAMPUS CONVERSATION WHAT’S GOING ON AND WHY? What is Climate Change and What Can We Do About It? Max Berkelhammer, Assistant Professor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, UIC; Sybil Derrible, Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Materials Engineering, UIC; Serap Erdal, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, UIC; Matt Wynter, Assistant Professor, Department of Finance, UIC; Moira Zellner, Associate Professor, Department of Urban Planning and Policy, UIC Wednesday, November 1, 2017 12:00–1:30 p.m. Michele Thompson Room A, Student Center West
Views: 97 thisisUIC
Myron C. Fagan - Les Illuminati et le CFR (1967)
 
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- S'abonner à la chaîne: https://bit.ly/2KxjCrQ Il s'agit d'un enregistrement de 1967 de Myron Coureval Fagan, pour lequel j'ai mis des sous-titres en français. J'ai moi-même corrigé la traduction jusqu'à 23 minutes, ensuite c'est une traduction automatique. Aussi, ce qui serait bien c'est que vous m'aidiez à finir la traduction des sous-titres ; ) ici: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?v=JSCaITn9Gzc&ref=share Myron Coureval Fagan (31 octobre 1887 - 12 mai 1972) est un dramaturge, réalisateur et producteur de cinéma américain. Il fut également essayiste de théories du complot, anticommuniste fervent et l'un des premiers à parler du complot Illuminati. Myron Coureval Fagan fut le mari de Minna Gombell. Il fut inspiré par John Thomas Flynn pour ses essais conspirationnistes. Voici une liste de ses oeuvres: Films : 1926 Mismates (scénariste) 1929 The Great Power (scénariste et réalisateur) 1931 Smart Woman (scénariste, adapté de sa pièce Nancy's Private Affair) 1931 A Holy Terror (scénariste) Livres et articles : 1932 Nancy's Private Affair, A comedy in three acts 1932 Peter Flies High, A comedy in three acts 1934 The Little Spitfire, A comedy-drama in three acts 1948 Red stars in Hollywood: Their helpers, fellow travelers, and co-conspirators 1948 Moscow over Hollywood (published by R.C. Cary, Los Angeles) 1949 Moscow marches on in Hollywood (News-bulletin/Cinema Educational Guild) 1950 Reds in the Anti-Defamation League (Cinema Educational Guild. News-bulletin, May 1950) 1950 Reds in "crusade for freedom!" (News bulletin) 1950 Hollywood reds are on the run! 1950 Documentation of the Red stars in Hollywood. 1950 Reds in the Anti-Defamation League. 1951 What is this thing called anti-semitism? (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) 1951 Saga of Operation Survival (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) 1953 Hollywood backs U.N. conspiracy 1954 Red Treason on Broadway (Cinema Educational Guild) 1956 United Nations "on trial" in Washington, D.C (News-bulletin) 1962 Must we have a Cuban "Pearl Harbor?" (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) 1964 How Hollywood is brainwashing the people (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) 1964 Civil rights, most sinister tool of the great conspiracy (News-Bulletin) 1965 How greatest white nations were mongrelized, then negroized: That is the fate planned for the American people (News-bulletin) 1966 The UN already secret government of U.S.!: Our recall project can smash it! (News-bulletin) 1966 The complete truth about the "United Nations" conspiracy! (News-bulletin) 1967 You must decide fate of our nation!!!: The Negro (CFR) plot is our greatest menace! (News-bulletin) 1969 Proofs of the great conspiracy and how to smash it!!! (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) * * * * * * * * - Mes documentaires, ebooks: https://sellfy.com/documents_rares_inedits - Chaîne DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/documents_rares_inedits - Chaîne Minds: https://www.minds.com/Documents_Rares_Inedits - Chaîne Pewtube: https://pewtube.com/user/Docus_Rares_Inedits - Soutenir mon travail: https://patreon.com/documents_rares_inedits - Faire un don (Paypal): https://bit.ly/2x1gX74 - Aidez-moi à traduire les vidéos de la chaîne ! : https://bit.ly/2K3KHkS ----------------------------------------------------------------------- URL de la vidéo:
Economic history of Japan
 
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The economic history of Japan is most studied for the spectacular social and economic growth in the 1800s after the Meiji Restoration, when it became the first non-European power, and for the expansion after the Second World War, when Japan recovered from devastation to become the world's second largest economy behind the United States, and from 2013 behind China as well. Scholars have evaluated the nation's unique economic position during the Cold War, with exports going to both U.S. and Soviet aligned powers, and have taken keen interest in the situation of the post-Cold War period of the Japanese 'lost decades'. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2335 Audiopedia
Historians at Work: Mark Robbins and Derek Oden
 
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An evening with Del Mar College Professors Mark Robbins and Derek Oden from the Department of Social Science. They both have published books. "Middle Class Union" by Mark W. Robbins and "Harvest of Hazards" by Derek Oden. This event was recorded on October 5, 2017 in the Del Mar College William F. White, Jr. Library.
Views: 53 Del Mar College
Arctic 2014: Who Gets a Voice and Why It Matters (Part 1)
 
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The discussion will focus on emerging challenges facing Arctic governance, analyze the goals and policies of key stakeholder nations, and evaluate means of promoting international cooperation in dealing with a rapidly changing environment.
Views: 814 WoodrowWilsonCenter
The New Normal: Presidential Politics and the University, 2017
 
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CCNY's Rifkind Center for the Humanities and the Arts presents a teach-in on the current political moment in the United States, March 7, 2017. Hear CCNY faculty members Judith Stein, Charles Vörösmarty, Mikhal Dekel, and Hidetaka Hirota, joined by Cooper Union's Atina Grossman and NYU's Jessica Benjamin. CCNY Interim President Vincent Boudreau introduces the panel, and CCNY's Andras Kisery moderates. https://www.ccny.cuny.edu/
Beta-Real Symposium
 
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March 23, 2018 in Slocum Hall at Syracuse University. Harry der Boghosian Symposium A diverse group of seven thinkers and makers explores the philosophical turn away from singular, knowable, stable, and metaphysical absolutes, towards a multitude of experiential, ambivalent, shared realities. Such ambivalent and unstable states have come increasingly to characterize our shared reality—from sites of contested memory and amnesia, to economic and identity politics in a globalized age of displacement, to scientific and technological revolutions. The Beta-Real names a search for alternative frameworks of understanding that might allow us to confront the contradictions of our contemporary reality. How we deal with these contradictions has social, cultural, and political implications—not only for architecture, humanities, science, society, and culture at large, but also for everyday life. Participants discuss how architecture might address and negotiate these states of contradiction. Participants present their own designs and research and discuss in round-table format how they each confront and navigate the Beta-Real. Participants: Linda Zhang, Boghosian Fellow Ani Liu, Artist and speculative technologist, New York, NY Biko Mandela Gray, Assistant Professor, Department of Religion, Syracuse University Natalie Koerner,  Ph.D. candidate, Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark Bryan E. Norwood, Ph.D. candidate in the history and theory of architecture, Harvard University; Visiting Assistant Professor, Mississippi State University School of Architecture Irene Chin, Curatorial Coordinator, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal, Canada William Stewart, Ph.D. candidate, Princeton University Department of German Yolandé Gouws, Artist, Berlin
ch 21) Carter-Ragan-Bush: The Bipartisan Consensus.
 
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chapter 21: A People's History (Of The United States) Howard Zinn. ~ Chapter 21, "Carter-Reagan-Bush: The Bipartisan Consensus", covers the Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush administrations and their effects on both the American people and foreign countries. Zinn argues that the Democratic and Republican parties keep the government essentially the same, maintaining policies favorable for corporations and militant foreign policy whichever party was in power. Zinn uses similarities between the three administrations' methods to argue for this. Other topics covered include the Fairness Doctrine, the Indonesian invasion of East Timor, Noam Chomsky, global warming, Roy Benavidez, the Trident submarine, the Star Wars program, the Sandinista National Liberation Front, the Iran-Contra Affair, the War Powers Act, U.S. invasion of Lebanon during the Lebanese Civil War, the Invasion of Grenada, Óscar Romero, the El Mozote massacre, the 1986 Bombing of Libya, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the United States invasion of Panama, and the Gulf War.
Views: 3412 andi burridge
Hjalmar Schacht, Reza Shah and the Nazi New Order in Iran, 1933-1941
 
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A lecture by Jennifer Jenkins, April 28, 2016. Jennifer L. Jenkins is Associate Professor of German and European History at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Provincial Modernity: Local Culture and Liberal Politics in Fin-de-Siècle Hamburg and Weltpolitik on the Persian Frontier: Germany and Iran in the Age of Empire about German-Iranian relations from the Crimean War to Operation Barbarossa. Future research interests include two projects: “Germany’s Orient, 1905-1979” and “Tehran 1943: Iran, Europe and the Second World War.”
JSGS Public Lecture~Saskatchewan First Nations and the Province's Resource Future
 
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Presented by Chief Bellegarde, Chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Saskatchewan is in the middle of an unprecedented resource boom. With oil and gas in the south, potash in central Saskatchewan and uranium in the North, along with promising mineral plays in various locations,Saskatchewan's economy is growing rapidly. First Nations are determined to benefit from the boom, as Treaty Peoples with strong ties to the land and with promises from government that we will benefit from development. With duty to consult and accommodate requirements in place, Saskatchewan First Nations have become national leaders in working out appropriate collaboration and impact and benefit agreements with companies and governments. Much more can be done. More First Nations can be employed on the resource projects. Greater care can be taken to protect our traditional lands and protect our people from harm. There are important business opportunities for First Nations companies that remain to be developed. First Nations will not stand in the way of properly managed development that is based on consultations and agreements with our communities, but nor will First Nations agree to open-ended development strategies that do not return a fair share of the benefits from resource development with the Saskatchewan First Nations.
Views: 1221 jsgspp
Hans-Hermann Hoppe - Democracy: The God That Failed - Audiobook (Google WaveNet Voice)
 
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The core of this book is a systematic treatment of the historic transformation of the West from monarchy to democracy. Source: http://www.hanshoppe.com/publications/#democracy (PDF available) Information about the book: https://mises.org/library/introduction-democracy-god-failed Music at the Beginning: Bass Walker - Film Noir Kevin MacLeod Jazz & Blues | Funky You're free to use this song and monetise your video, but you must include the following in your video description: Bass Walker - Film Noir by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200071 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Music at the end: Sunday Stroll by Huma-Huma
Views: 1760 Philosophy Workout 2
Will this Tech Company Suffer?
 
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Subscribe to stay up to date with the latest videos ► https://www.sbry.co/suBiH Episode 12 - Will this Tech Company Suffer? Buck is joined by guest co-host PJ O’Rourke to discuss the uproar in Silicon Valley over the Google “anti-diversity memo” and what to really make of the idea that there are innate leadership differences between genders. PJ reveals the apparent “lemming run” of the Democratic party and what the lack of current leadership means going forward. Buck recalls his “jaw on the floor” moment when he met Anthony “The Mooch” Scaramucci and how this reflects on the Trump administration. Special guest Dinesh D’Souza, conservative thinker and author of The Roots of Obama’s Rage is out with a new book, The Big Lie, since he survived a prison scare with Obama’s Justice Department in 2014. “Arianna” makes an appearance in the mailbag to respond to listener comments. Be sure to click here to never miss an episode ↓ SPOTIFY ► https://www.sbry.co/ufnNP GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC ► https://www.sbry.co/lkwhp ITUNES ► https://www.sbry.co/7OQ79 SOUNDCLOUD ► https://www.sbry.co/jHn5h STITCHER ► https://www.sbry.co/tEkL5 Check out NewsWire’s Investors MarketCast ↓ GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC ► https://www.sbry.co/dzzKq APPLE ITUNES ► https://www.sbry.co/GoCV0 STITCHER ► https://www.sbry.co/s86p1 ———————————— Follow us on Twitter ► https://www.sbry.co/p11ih Join our Facebook Community ► https://www.sbry.co/fMckK Check out our website ► https://www.sbry.co/wUAye Check out Stansberry NewsWire ►https://www.sbry.co/IhNeW Check out Health and Wealth Bulletin ► https://www.sbry.co/iHRmD Check out Extreme Value ► https://www.sbry.co/EvIiH ————————————
Social democracy
 
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Social democracy is a political ideology that officially has as its goal the establishment of democratic socialism through reformist and gradualist methods. Alternatively, social democracy is defined as a policy regime involving a universal welfare state and collective bargaining schemes within the framework of a capitalist economy. It is often used in this manner to refer to the social models and economic policies prominent in Western and Northern Europe during the later half of the 20th century. Following the split between reformists and revolutionary socialists in the Second International, Social democrats have advocated for a peaceful and evolutionary transition of the economy to socialism through progressive social reform of capitalism. Social democracy asserts that the only acceptable constitutional form of government is representative democracy under the rule of law. It promotes extending democratic decision-making beyond political democracy to include economic democracy to guarantee employees and other economic stakeholders sufficient rights of co-determination. It supports a mixed economy that opposes the excesses of capitalism such as inequality, poverty, and oppression of various groups, while rejecting both a totally free market or a fully planned economy. Common social democratic policies include advocacy of universal social rights to attain universally accessible public services such as education, health care, workers' compensation, and other services, including child care and care for the elderly. Social democracy is connected with the trade union labour movement and supports collective bargaining rights for workers. Most social democratic parties are affiliated with the Socialist International. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2162 Audiopedia
Understanding the Definition and Scope of the Duty to Consult....
 
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Understanding the Definition and Scope of the Duty to Consult and Accommodate Today and How It Impacts You Daniel Pagowski Legal Counsel‚ Department of Justice Aboriginal Law and Strategic Police Christopher Devlin Partner Devlin Gailus Barristers & Solicitors Sandra Gogal Partner Miller Thomson LLP How have recent case law developments shed light on the basic questions, such as: What is the scope of the duty to consult? When is the duty triggered? What is included in "contemplated Crown conduct"? How much of the duty can be delegated a) to municipalities? b) to proponents? How much of what proponents do, goes towards the discharge of the Crown's duty? How are Rio Tinto Alcan Inc. v. Carrier Sekani Tribal Council and Adams Lake Indian Band v. British Columbia being applied by lower courts? Clarifying the role of regulatory bodies with respect to the duty to consult Looking at how the B.C. Court of Appeal decision in West Moberly First Nations v. British Columbia (Chief Inspector of Mines) has further shaped the Crown's duty to consult with respect to past impacts and cumulative effects, and the issue of Crown accommodation Understanding how the recent trend towards complex partnership agreements is affecting accommodation by the Crown There have been developments since last year to the "definition and scope" of the duty to consult. Ensure you get all the crucial updates at The Canadian Institute's 7th Annual Forum on Aboriginal Law, Consultation & Accommodation on February 20-21, 2013 View the list of speakers, program agenda and register at www.CanadianInstitute.com/AboriginalLaw
Welfare state
 
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A welfare state is a concept of government in which the state plays a key role in the protection and promotion of the economic and social well-being of its citizens. It is based on the principles of equality of opportunity, equitable distribution of wealth, and public responsibility for those unable to avail themselves of the minimal provisions for a good life. The general term may cover a variety of forms of economic and social organization. The sociologist T.H. Marshall identified the welfare state as a distinctive combination of democracy, welfare, and capitalism. Scholars have paid special attention to the historic paths by which Germany, Britain and other countries developed their welfare state. Modern welfare states include the Nordic countries, such as Iceland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Finland which employ a system known as the Nordic model. Esping-Andersen classified the most developed welfare state systems into three categories; Social Democratic, Conservative, and Liberal. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 5914 Audiopedia
Words at War: The Veteran Comes Back / One Man Air Force / Journey Through Chaos
 
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Major Dominic Salvatore "Don" Gentile (December 6, 1920 - January 28, 1951) was a World War II USAAF pilot who was the first to break Eddie Rickenbacker's World War I record of 26 downed aircraft. Gentile was born in Piqua, Ohio.[2] After a fascination with flying as a child, his father provided him with his own plane, an Aerosport Biplane. He managed to log over 300 hours flying time by July 1941, when he attempted to join the Army Air Force. The U.S. military required two years of college for its pilots, which Gentile did not have, therefore Gentile originally enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and was posted to the UK in 1941. Gentile flew the Supermarine Spitfire Mark V with No. 133 Squadron, one of the famed "Eagle Squadron" during 1942. His first kills (a Ju 88 and Fw 190) were on August 1, 1942,[3] during Operation Jubilee.[4] In September 1942, the Eagle squadrons transferred to the USAAF, becoming the 4th Fighter Group. Gentile became a flight commander in September 1943, now flying the P-47 Thunderbolt. Having been Spitfire pilots, Gentile and the other pilots of the 4th were displeased when they transitioned to the heavy P-47. By late 1943 Group Commander Col. Don Blakeslee pushed for re-equipment with the lighter, more maneuverable, P-51 Mustang. Conversion to the P-51B at the end of February 1944 allowed Gentile to build a tally of 15.5 additional aircraft destroyed between March 3 and April 8, 1944.[5] After downing 3 planes on April 8,[6] he was the top scoring 8th Air Force ace when he crashed his personal P-51, named "Shangri La", on April 13, 1944 while stunting over the 4th FG's airfield at Debden for a group of assembled press reporters and movie cameras. Blakeslee immediately grounded Gentile as a result, and he was sent back to the US for a tour selling War Bonds. In 1944, Gentile wrote One Man Air Force an autobiography and account of his combat missions with well-known war correspondent, Ira Wolfert. His final tally of credits was 19.83 aerial victories and 3 damaged,[5] with 6 ground kills, in 350 combat hours flown. He also claimed two victories while with the RAF. After the war, he stayed with the Air Force, as a test pilot at Wright Field, as a Training Officer in the Fighter Gunnery Program, and as a student officer at the Air Tactical School. In June 1949, Gentile enrolled as an undergraduate studying military science at the University of Maryland. On January 28, 1951, he was killed when he crashed in a T-33A-1-LO Shooting Star trainer, 49-905, in Forestville, Maryland, leaving behind his wife Isabella Masdea Gentile Beitman (deceased October 2008), and sons Don Jr., Joseph and Pasquale. Gentile Air Force Station in Kettering, Ohio was named in his honor in 1962. The installation closed in 1996. Winston Churchill called Gentile and his wingman, Captain John T. Godfrey, Damon and Pythias, after the legendary characters from Greek mythology. He was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 1995.[7] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_S._Gentile
Views: 108211 Remember This
OISE presents Jackson Lecture on First Nations' Education - April 18, 2013
 
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Guest Speakers: National Chief Shawn Atleo, Assembly of First Nations in Canada and Rt. Hon. Paul Martin, Former Prime Minister of Canada Moderated by: Dr. Julia O'Sullivan, Professor and Dean, OISE Introductions by: Dr. Suzanne Stewart, Special Advisor to the Dean on Aboriginal Education, OISE
Nativism (politics)
 
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Nativism is the political position of demanding a favored status for certain established inhabitants of a nation as compared to claims of newcomers or immigrants. Nativism typically means opposition to immigration, and support of efforts to lower the political or legal status of specific ethnic or cultural groups who are considered hostile or alien to the natural culture, upon the assumption that they cannot be assimilated. According to Fetzer, (2000) opposition to immigration is common in many countries because of issues of national, cultural, and religious identity. The phenomenon has been studied especially in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States, as well as Europe in recent years, where immigration is seen as lowering the wages of the less well paid natives. Thus nativism has become a general term for 'opposition to immigration' based on fears that the immigrants will distort or spoil existing cultural values. In situations where the nativistic movement exists inside of dominant culture it tends to be associated with xenophobic and assimilationist projects. At the other end of the spectrum, in situations where immigrants greatly outnumber the original inhabitants or where contact forces economic and cultural change, nativistic movements can allow cultural survival. Among North American Indians important nativist movements include Neolin (the "Delaware Prophet", 1762), Tenskwatawa (the Shawnee prophet, 1808), and Wovoka (the Ghost Dance movement, 1889). They held anti-white views, teaching that whites were morally inferior to the Indians and their ways must be rejected. Thus Tenskwatawa taught that the Americans were "children of the Evil Spirit." This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 528 Audiopedia
Words at War: Barriers Down / Camp Follower / The Guys on the Ground
 
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Alfred Friendly (December 30, 1911 -- November 7, 1983) was an American journalist, editor and writer for the Washington Post. He began his career as a reporter with the Post in 1939 and became Managing Editor in 1955. In 1967 he covered the Mideast War for the Post in a series of articles for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 1968. He is credited with bringing the Post from being a local paper to having a position of national prominence. Friendly was born in Salt Lake City. After graduating in from Amherst College in 1933, he came to Washington, DC to look for work. A former professor who worked in the Commerce Department hired him, but his appointment to a high position at such a young age earned him criticism in the press and he resigned. For the next year he travelled the country in the middle of the Depression, eventually returning to become a reporter at the Washington Daily News, writing a column for government employees. Less than two years later he was hired to write the same kind of column for the Post, where he was soon assigned to cover war mobilization efforts and anti-war strikes. When World War II broke out he entered the Army Air Force, rising to the rank of Major before leaving in 1945. While in the military he was involved in cryptography and intelligence operations, finally becoming the second in command at Bletchley Park, and the highest ranking American officer there. After the war he remained in Europe as press aide to W. Averell Harriman supervisor of the Marshall Plan. A year later he returned to Washington and to the Post, where he became assistant managing editor in 1952 and managing editor in 1955. In 1966 he became an associate editor and a foreign correspondent based out of London. Hearing rumors of war in 1967 he headed to the Middle East where he was present throughout the 1967 War and wrote his series of award winning articles. He retired from the Post in 1971, though he continued writing occasional editorials and book reviews. During his retirement he wrote several books, and after his death the Alfred Friendly Foundation was established. It administers the Alfred Friendly Press Fellowships to bring foreign journalists to the United States for internships at prominent newspapers. The Archives and Special Collections at Amherst College holds a collection of his papers. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Friendly
Views: 147295 Remember This
New World Order (conspiracy theory)
 
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As a conspiracy theory, the term New World Order or NWO refers to the emergence of a totalitarian world government. The common theme in conspiracy theories about a New World Order is that a secretive power elite with a globalist agenda is conspiring to eventually rule the world through an authoritarian world government—which will replace sovereign nation-states—and an all-encompassing propaganda that makes the establishment of the New World Order the culmination of history's progress and an idealogy. Significant occurrences in politics and finance are speculated to be orchestrated by an unduly influential cabal that operates through many front organizations. Numerous historical and current events are seen as steps in an ongoing plot to achieve world domination through secret political gatherings and decision-making processes. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 806 Audiopedia
Indigenous Perspectives and Representations in the Media - panel discussion
 
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With Jennifer David, Jocelyn Formsma and Howard Adler (bios below). Moderated by Greg Macdougall. On Saturday Nov 17, 2012 at the Media Democracy Conference - http://organizingforjustice.ca - University of Ottawa, unceded Algonquin territory. Hosted by Organizing For Justice, and the Ottawa Working Group of the Media Co-op. Panel Description: A facilitated discussion on the intersection of Indigenous peoples and the media. What approaches do Indigenous media-makers adopt in doing their work? How well are mainstream and alternative media doing in considering and representing Indigenous perspectives to both Native and non-Native audiences? What work still needs to be done? Bios: Jocelyn Formsma is a member of the Moose Cree First Nation and currently lives in Ottawa, ON. Jocelyn has extensive experience in children's rights and youth engagement and has a Bachelor of Social Sciences in Public Administration. She is currently pursuing her law degree from the University of Ottawa and will graduate in 2015. She is a film maker and host of "The Circle", a radio show featuring Indigenous artists and issues, on CHUO the Ottawa U campus radio station. Jennifer David was born and raised in northern Ontario and is a member of Chapleau Cree First Nation. She has spent her career working in and supporting Aboriginal media in Canada, first at Television Northern Canada, then as APTN's first Director of Communications, then as a consultant with Debwe Communications. Jennifer has a degree in Journalism from Carleton University and currently runs her own First Nation management consulting company called Stonecircle. She recently self-published a book about the launch of APTN: "Original People, Original Television". Howard Adler is an award winning writer, and an artist that has worked in diverse mediums, including visual art, sound art, stained glass, theatre, dance, video editing, and film. In 2009 he won the Canadian Aboriginal Youth Writing Challenge (19-29 age category) with his video script "Johnny Seven Fires". He is currently the Co-Director of the Asinabka Festival, an Indigenous film and media arts festival that had its inaugural year in Ottawa in June 2012. Howard is Jewish and Anishinaabe and a member of Lac des Mille Lacs First Nation in North-western Ontario.
Views: 1785 org4jus
Rationing in the United Kingdom
 
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Rationing was introduced temporarily by the British government several times during the 20th century, during and immediately after a war. At the start of the Second World War in 1939 the United Kingdom imported 20 million long tons (20 Mt) of food per year (70%), including more than 50% of its meat, 70% of its cheese and sugar, nearly 80% of fruits and about 70% of cereals and fats. The civilian population was about 50 million. It was one of the principal strategies of the Germans to attack shipping bound for Britain, restricting British industry and potentially starving the nation into submission. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 192 Audiopedia
Prisoner-of-war camp
 
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A prisoner-of-war camp is a site for the containment of enemy combatants captured by a belligerent power in time of war. It is similar to an internment camp which is used for civilians. Purpose built prisoner-of-war camps appeared at Norman Cross in England in 1797 and HM Prison Dartmoor, both constructed during the Napoleonic Wars and they have been in use in all the main conflicts of the last 200 years. The main camps are used for soldiers, sailors, marines, coast guards, and more recently, airmen of an enemy power who have been captured by a belligerent power during or immediately after an armed conflict. In addition, non-combatants, such as merchant mariners and civilian aircrews, have been imprisoned in some conflicts. With the adoption of the Geneva Convention on the Prisoners of War in 1929 and later superseded by the Third Geneva Convention, prisoner of war camps have been required to be open to inspection by authorized representatives of a neutral power. Not all belligerents have consistently applied the convention in all conflicts. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 115 Audiopedia
Monetary Policy Hearing (3/17/2011) - Lewis Lehrman
 
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Opening statement for Lewis Lehrman at the 3/17/2011 hearing of the Domestic Monetary Policy & Technology Subcommittee, chaired by Ron Paul. Audio boosted.
Views: 2521 Dave Jones
2016 Grant Wood Symposium Morning Session
 
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Kerry Dean Carso (State University of New York at New Paltz) presents "Grant Wood and the After-Life of Victorian Architecture"; James Swensen (Brigham Young University) presents "On Common Ground: Grant Wood and the photography of the Farm Security Administration"; and Annelise K. Madsen (Art Institute of Chicago) presents "'Something of color and imagination': Grant Wood, Storytelling, and the Past's Appeal in Depression-Era America" at the 2016 Grant Wood Symposium held at the University of Iowa. Learn more at https://grantwood.uiowa.edu. 00:00 - 48:21 Kerry Dean Carso 48:22 - 1:23:11 James Swensen 1:23:12 - 2:02:24 Annelise K. Madsen
Views: 324 Outreach Iowa
This Brick Ark: Celebrating Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology
 
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Lecture by James Hanken Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), the product of larger-than-life figures of 19th-century science, is a world-renowned center for research and education in evolutionary and comparative biology. The MCZ’s Director, Dr. James Hanken, explores the history of this institution, what it can tell us about the changing role of university-based natural history museums, and what museums must do to survive—indeed, to thrive—in the 21st century. Part of the Museum of Comparative Zoology’s 150th anniversary lecture series. Presented by the Harvard Museum of Natural History.
Tlingit Music--Past, Present and Future: Ed Littlefield at TEDxSitka
 
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Ed Littlefield is a Tlingit Native of Southeast Alaska currently working on composing and arranging Native music from the Tlingit tradition. He studied percussion at the University of Idaho and has played in the Idaho-Washington Symphony, The Orion Trombone Quartet, Dallas Brass, the Jazz Police and many other professional groups in the Northwest. Ed has recently completed an album combining traditional Alaskan Native music with jazz, called "Walking Between Worlds," featuring the Native Jazz Quartet: Ed Littlefield (drums); Jason Marsalis (vibes); Christian Fabian (bass); and Reuel Lubag (piano). His talk focuses on this fusion and the possibilities it offers. About TEDx, x = independently organized event. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 3896 TEDx Talks
2018 Ideas Conference - Full Event
 
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For the past 15 years, the Center for American Progress has served as a creative engine for introducing bold solutions that advance progressive values on nearly every possible front. In the past year alone, we have defended the Affordable Care Act; outlined policies to create workplaces that support women and families; discussed the impact of race across a wide range of issue areas; and helped drive opposition to President Donald Trump’s tax plan. At CAP, we believe that ideas are the heart of all progressive change, but we also know that ideas aren’t enough. It takes grassroots advocacy and real leadership supporting those ideas to create true progressive change. As we celebrate our 15th year of big ideas, CAP is bringing together elected officials, policy experts, cultural influencers, and grassroots activists at the 2018 CAP Ideas Conference, where we will explore and unveil new ideas that can make America a place for every single one of us to thrive. SPEAKERS INCLUDE: ` SEN. CORY BOOKER | (D-NJ) SEN. SHERROD BROWN | (D-OH) JULIÁN CASTRO | Former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development MAYOR BILL DE BLASIO | New York, NY RYAN DEITSCH | Activist and Student, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School SEN. KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND | (D-NY) FATIMA GOSS GRAVES | President and CEO, National Women’s Law Center GOV. JAY INSLEE | (D-WA) SEN. DOUG JONES | (D-AL) REP. JOSEPH KENNEDY III | (D-MA) SEN. AMY KLOBUCHAR | (D-MN) PAUL KRUGMAN | Economist, Nobel laureate MARIA TERESA KUMAR | President and CEO, Voto Latino REP. TED LIEU | (D-CA) SARAH MCBRIDE | Author and National Press Secretary, Human Rights Campaign SEN. CHRIS MURPHY | (D-CT) GOV. PHIL MURPHY | (D-NJ) DEJUAN PATTERSON | Founding Partner/CEO, The BeMore Group CECILE RICHARDS | President, Planned Parenthood Federation of America SEN. BERNIE SANDERS | (I-VT) REP. TERRI SEWELL | (D-AL) SEN. ELIZABETH WARREN | (D-MA) SALLY YATES | Former acting U.S. Attorney General
Views: 6225 seeprogress
Family Weekend Forum 2017: Race, Authoritarian Populism and American Politics Today
 
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An academic forum entitled, "Race, Authoritarian Populism and American Politics Today," led by Dr. Anthony Bogues, Director of the Center for the Study of Slavery & Justice. For more info see: https://www.brown.edu/initiatives/slavery-and-justice/events/2017/10/family-weekend-cssj-race-authoritarian-populism-and-american-politics-today-dr-anthon Saturday, October 14, 2017 Brown University
Views: 160 Brown University
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 3- Current Health Services
 
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The current picture of First Nations is described, including limitations in decision-making and governance.
Views: 2870 fnhealthcouncil
California Gold Rush
 
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Coordinates: 38°48′09″N 120°53′41″W / 38.80250°N 120.89472°W / 38.80250; -120.89472 This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 418 encyclopediacc
"All My Relations: Biennale of Sydney 2012"
 
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The Dr. Allen Root Contemporary Art Distinguished Lecture with Gerald McMaster Ph.D., Fredrik S. Eaton Curator, Canadian Art, Art Galley of Ontario Dr. McMaster was recently selected as co-Artistic Director to the 2012 Biennale of Sydney. In his lecture, he will touch on the themes and issues that will shape this important international exhibition. Dr. McMaster, a curator and artist, was responsible for the installation of the permanent exhibitions at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, and more recently the reinstallation of the Canadian Wing at the Art Gallery of Ontario. His publications include New Tribe/New York (2005), Remix (2007), and the critically acclaimed Inuit Modern (2011). His awards and recognitions include the 2001 ICOM-Canada Prize, the 2005 National Aboriginal Achievement Award, and the Order of Canada (2007). Location: Arthur M. Loew Auditorium
Views: 4342 Dartmouth