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Anthracite Coal Mining circa 1920
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "Lots of diagrammatic animation. Anthracite coal mining. Underground mining shots." Silent. Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A Public domain film from the Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 13132 Jeff Quitney
How Coal Mines Work: "Mining and Preparation of Anthracite Coal" circa 1934 Delaware & Lackawanna
 
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Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A more at http://scitech.quickfound.net Very good demonstration of coal mining processes in the 1930s. 'Underground mining scenes... Sequence shows miners leaving work, washing up and going home to greet families.' Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%. The term is applied to those varieties of coal which do not give off tarry or other hydrocarbon vapours when heated below their point of ignition. Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the majority of global production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal... blind coal... Kilkenny coal... crow coal... and black diamond. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region. Legend has it that Allen fell asleep at the base of Broad Mountain and woke to the sight of a large fire because his campfire had ignited an outcropping of anthracite coal. By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River. Anthracite was first experimentally burned as a residential heating fuel in the US on 11 February 1808, by Judge Jesse Fell in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, on an open grate in a fireplace. Anthracite differs from wood in that it needs a draft from the bottom, and Judge Fell proved with his grate design that it was a viable heating fuel. In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917... From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States, until it was supplanted first by oil burning systems and more recently by natural gas systems... China today mines by far the largest share of global anthracite production, accounting for more than three-quarters of global output. Most Chinese production is of standard-grade anthracite, which is used in power generation. Increased demand in China has made that country into a net importer of the fuel, mostly from Vietnam, another major producer of anthracite for power generation, although increasing domestic consumption in Vietnam means that exports may be scaled back. Current U.S. anthracite production averages around 5 million tons per year. Of that, about 1.8 million tons were mined in the state of Pennsylvania...
Views: 1884 Jeff Quitney
Anthracite Coal Mining: "Black Sunlight" ~ 1920s Bray Studios; Pennsylvania Strip & Deep Mining
 
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Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "On anthracite coal mining--with animation showing how coal was created underground--Pan over valley in anthracite region of Pennsylvania -- strip mining deep mining--mining footage -- cars of crude coal to breaker removing waste from coal -- pile of tailing -- sizing of coal pieces loading on railroad cars -- pan over loaded railcars, trains rolling." Silent. Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 1437 Jeff Quitney
Mining Heritage Of Schuylkill County Pennsylvania
 
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A slide show depicting the anthracite coal mining heritage of Schuylkill County Pennsylvania.Between Carbon County and Schuylkill County the Molly Maguires were convicted and hung.In 1902 there was a anthracite coal mining strike with the United Mine Workers.
Views: 566 Rusty Suender
Coal Mining 100 Years Ago: "The Story of Coal" ~ 1920 Bray Studios
 
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Geology & Earth Sciences playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A more at http://scitech.quickfound.net How coal is formed, and how coal is mined. Silent. Subtitled "Studies in Chemistry." Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Coal (from the Old English term col, which has meant "mineral of fossilized carbon" since the 13th century) is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams. The harder forms, such as anthracite coal, can be regarded as metamorphic rock because of later exposure to elevated temperature and pressure. Coal is composed primarily of carbon along with variable quantities of other elements, chiefly hydrogen, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Throughout history, coal has been a useful resource. It is primarily burned for the production of electricity and/or heat, and is also used for industrial purposes, such as refining metals. A fossil fuel, coal forms when dead plant matter is converted into peat, which in turn is converted into lignite, then sub-bituminous coal, after that bituminous coal, and lastly anthracite. This involves biological and geological processes that take place over a long period. Coal is the largest source of energy for the generation of electricity worldwide, as well as one of the largest worldwide anthropogenic sources of carbon dioxide releases. In 1999 world gross carbon dioxide emissions from coal usage were 8,666 million tonnes of carbon dioxide. Coal-fired electric power generation emits around 2,000 pounds of carbon dioxide for every megawatt-hour generated, which is almost double the approximately 1100 pounds of carbon dioxide released by a natural gas-fired electric plant per megawatt-hour generated. Because of this higher carbon efficiency of natural gas generation, as the fuel mix in the United States has changed to reduce coal and increase natural gas generation, carbon dioxide emissions have fallen. Those measured in the first quarter of 2012 were the lowest of any recorded for the first quarter of any year since 1992. Coal is extracted from the ground by coal mining, either underground by shaft mining, or at ground level by open pit mining extraction. Since 1983 the world top coal producer is China, in 2011 China produced 3,520 millions of tonnes of coal -- 49.5% of 7,695 millions tonnes world coal production. In 2011 other large producers were United States (993 millions tonnes), India (589), European Union (576) and Australia (416). In 2010 largest exporters were Australia with 328 million tonnes (27.1% of world coal export) and Indonesia with 316 millions tonnes (26.1%), while largest importers were Japan with 207 million tonnes (17.5% of world coal import), China with 195 million tonnes (16.6%) and South Korea with 126 million tonnes (10.7%)... Formation At various times in the geologic past, the Earth had dense forests in low-lying wetland areas. Due to natural processes such as flooding, these forests were buried under the soil. As more and more soil deposited over them, they were compressed. The temperature also rose as they sank deeper and deeper. As the process continued the plant matter was protected from biodegradation and oxidation, usually by mud or acidic water. This trapped the carbon in immense peat bogs that were eventually covered and deeply buried by sediments. Under high pressure and high temperature, dead vegetation was slowly converted to coal. As coal contains mainly carbon, the conversion of dead vegetation into coal is called carbonization. The wide, shallow seas of the Carboniferous era provided ideal conditions for coal formation, although coal is known from most geological periods. The exception is the coal gap in the Permian--Triassic extinction event, where coal is rare. Coal is known from Precambrian strata, which predate land plants — this coal is presumed to have originated from residues of algae...
Views: 1322 Jeff Quitney
Coal Strike in 1900 Affects Presidential Politics
 
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A strike of coal miners organized by the United Mine Workers (UMW) in 1900 becomes an issue in the McKinley-Bryan contest for the presidency.
Views: 16334 danieljbmitchell
Coal Mining 1920s - 1930s (1920-1939)
 
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Unissued / unused material. Compilation of coal mining material from the 1920s and 1930s. VS of men walking to the coal face. Shots of pit ponies. Miners' Lamps of different kinds. Men work the coal with picks and carry the coal away from the seam. MS of men drinking and eating 'snap' during break. Shots of early cutting machines in use in pit. Coal trucks are pushed back from the face. VS of steam power and pithead winding gear. Very quickly cut montage of winding gear in use bringing cage up the shaft at a colliery. VS of men leaving cage at end of a shift and handing in their tally tokens. VS of houses in mining village. Shots of men going home as smoke rises from chimneys. VS of railway yard with lots of coal trucks. Points are changed automatically. VS of coal being delivered on horse and cart by coal merchant. VS of coal being off loaded from ships and fed into power stations and factories. VS of chimneys and winding gear. FILM ID:3409.06 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 11811 British Pathé
UK Coal Mining History.
 
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Coal is the cheapest source of energy on this planet and lot of it, We need it back as it will give Jobs to our grandchildren who have no work at all today, UK is in a mess, since they closed the mines, We have the technology today to regulate the carbon from Coal, best Job I ever had, (Retired Cola Miner Clive Worth.)
Views: 6200 Clive Worth
Mine Workers Strike 1902
 
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Views: 7032 Keith Orr
US Mines & Mineral Resources: "United States: A Ten Talent Nation" 1922 American Motion Picture
 
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Geology & Earth Sciences playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A more at http://scitech.quickfound.net Good overview of mining and mineral resources in the US as of 1922, with many nice film clips and lots of statistics. Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, or reef, which forms the mineralized package of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal and oil shale, gemstones, limestone, and dimension stone, rock salt and potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stone and metal has been done since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. The nature of mining processes creates a potential negative impact on the environment both during the mining operations and for years after the mine is closed. This impact has led to most of the world's nations adopting regulations to moderate the negative effects of mining operations. Safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have improved safety in mines significantly... Mining in the United States became prevalent in the 19th century, and the General Mining Act of 1872 was passed to encourage mining of federal lands. As with the California Gold Rush in the mid 19th century, mining for minerals and precious metals, along with ranching, was a driving factor in the Westward Expansion to the Pacific coast. With the exploration of the West, mining camps were established and "expressed a distinctive spirit, an enduring legacy to the new nation;" Gold Rushers would experience the same problems as the Land Rushers of the transient West that preceded them. Aided by railroads, many traveled West for work opportunities in mining. Western cities such as Denver and Sacramento originated as mining towns. As new areas were explored, it was usually the gold (placer and then load) and then silver that were taken first, with other metals often waiting for railroads or canals. Coarse gold dust and nuggets do not require smelting, is easy to identify and is easily transported. Modern period In the early 20th century, the gold and silver rush to the western United States also stimulated mining for base metals such as copper, lead, and iron as well as coal. Areas in modern Montana, Utah, Arizona, and later Alaska became predominate suppliers of copper to the world, which was increasingly demanding copper for electrical and households goods. Canada's mining industry grew more slowly than the United States due to limitations in transportation, capital, and U.S. competition; Ontario was the major producer of the early 20th century with nickel, copper, and gold. Meanwhile, Australia experienced the Australian gold rushes and by the 1850s was producing 40% of the world's gold, followed by the establishment of large mines such as the Mount Morgan Mine, which ran for nearly a hundred years, Broken Hill ore deposit (one of the largest zinc-lead ore deposits), and iron ore mines at Iron Knob. After declines in production, another boom in mining occurred in the 1960s and in the 21st century Australia remains a major world mineral producer. Into the 21st century, a globalized mining industry of large multinational corporations has arisen. Peak minerals and environmental impacts have also become a concern. Different elements, particularly rare earth minerals, have begun to increase in demand as a result of new technologies...
Views: 1515 Jeff Quitney
Coal Strike of 1902
 
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class project
Views: 2058 Shelley Donadieu
Coal Mine Farmersville & Girard Illinois Crown 2 & 3 Freeman United 2017 Abandoned coal mine
 
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Coal Mine Farmersville & Girard Crown 2 & 3 Freeman United later renamed Springfield Coal Company. these mines have long ago shutdown and this is what remains. My dad worked at Crown 3 in Farmersville. I created this video with the YouTube Slideshow Creator (https://www.youtube.com/upload)
Views: 283 Tom Shelton
Coal Mining: The Disasters and the History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation
 
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A public domain video A film about the history of underground coal mining throughout the years. The disasters and the health regulations. -The Monongah Mining Disaster was the worst mining accident in American history; 362 men and young boys were killed in an underground explosion on December 6, 1907 in Monongah, West Virginia. -Following a decade in which the number of coal mining fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau Of Mines in 1910 as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was to investigate accidents, advise industry, conduct production and safety research, and teach courses in accident prevention, first aid, and mine rescue. However, Congress did not empower the federal inspectors to enter and inspect mines until 1941, and did not authorize a code of federal regulations for mine safety until 1947. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Acts of 1969 and 1977 set greater safety standards for the industry. Where annual mining deaths had numbered more than 1,000 a year in the early part of the 20th century, they decreased to an average of about 500 in the late 1950s. Subscribe - never miss a video! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_S8ZlDCRkMMgc7ciw8X-hg The 20th Century Time Machine takes you back in time to the most important historical events of the past century. Watch documentaries, discussions and real footage of major events that shaped the world we live in today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHAZA5h5cmo
Views: 1352 npatou
Mining Afghan coal
 
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McClatchy's Jonathan Landay visits a desolate coal mining facility in Afghanistan. (Video by Tish Wells)
Reel America: WWII Homefront Films - "Drive for Anthracite" - 1942
 
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INFO: http://series.c-span.org/History/Events/Reel-America-World-War-II-Homefront-Films/10737443858/
Views: 2797 C-SPAN
United States Gold Mining Claim - Arizona - 2017
 
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The United States mine is located just outside of Cottonwood, Arizona, in the North Verde Mining District. The mine was worked as an open pit, therfore there are no underground workings. The mine has an extensive history of production and a massive amount of work was done at the site. Historically, the United States mine was worked for gold, copper, and silver, and the entire area is littered with copper ore. The ores are rich and in good supply, but will need to be processed in bulk to be profitable.
A History of Coal's Extraordinary Impact on Human Civilization (2003)
 
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The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has historically been used to describe a coal mine operation, but the word today is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, jacks and shearers The American share of world coal production remained steady at about 20 percent from 1980 to 2005, at about 1 billion short tons per year. The United States was ranked as the 2nd coal producing country in the world in 2010, and possesses the largest coal reserves in the world. In 2008 then-President George W. Bush stated that coal was the most reliable source of electricity.[61] However, in 2011 President Barack Obama said that the US should rely more on "clean" sources of energy that emit lower or no carbon dioxide pollution.[62] As of 2013, while domestic coal consumption for electric power was being displaced by natural gas, exports were increasing. US coal production increasingly comes from strip mines in the western United States, such as from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana.[63] Coal has come under continued price pressure from natural gas and renewable energy sources, which has resulted in a rapid decline of coal in the U.S. and several notable bankruptcies including Peabody Energy. On April 13, 2016 it reported, its revenue tumbled 17 percent as coal price fell and lost 2 billion dollars on the previous year.[64] It then filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy on April 13, 2016.[64] The Harvard Business Review discussed retraining coal workers for solar photovoltaic employment because of the rapid rise in U.S. solar jobs.[65] A recent study indicated that this was technically possible and would account for only 5% of the industrial revenue from a single year to provide coal workers with job security in the energy industry as whole. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining
Views: 607 Way Back
How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries
 
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How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries. Welcome to DOCUMENTARIES - home of the best documentary movies and documentary films. Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States, "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, hydraulic jacks and shearers. Read More About "How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries" - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining Subscribe to Documentaries to be the first to receive updates - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQtbnPVhfIsKCzbVOHk_WEg Join us in our documentaries community discussion by following us in our documentaries Google+ community discussion - https://aboutme.google.com/u/0/b/116952488485458973611 Thanks for watching DOCUMENTARIES - home of the best documentary movies and documentary films. #Documentaries #YouTubeMovies #DocumentaryMovies #Education #Entertainment Thanks for watching "How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries"
Views: 576 Documentaries
Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History
 
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Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, hydraulic jacks and shearers. Small-scale mining of surface deposits dates back thousands of years. For example, in Roman Britain, the Romans were exploiting most of the major coalfields by the late 2nd century AD. Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining
Views: 591 Classic History
A Short History of Coal and Coal Mining in England
 
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The brilliant and gifted Lowell Bartholomee created this shiny little diamond from Mr. P's fern-like script as a (mock) educational film for the 2004 production of "The Road To Wigan Pier: A (Socialist) Tea-Time Travelogue & Historical Musical Revue," although all the facts are researched and real. The voices you hear are David Jarrott narrating, Paul Norton as A Lump of Coal (and the Mighty Fern!). The Early Man is Judson Jones and the crowds are sundry gentlemen from the production itself. You can read the review ("Off the charts wraparound sensory experience . . . live music, text, film, dance, still photos . . . a ridiculous amount of fun.” Molly Beth Brenner, Austin Chronicle 2004) as confirmation that, yes, we did stage that play! http://www.austinchronicle.com/arts/2004-01-23/193886/
Views: 3171 Robi Polgar
The Rise and Fall of Coal in McDowell County, West Virginia
 
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See All of the High Quality Images here - http://www.dewitzphotography.com/personal-photography-projects/west-virginia-coal-country-mcdowell-county-part-1/ More photos from my ongoing West Virginia photography project can be seen here - http://www.travisdewitz.com/west-virginia All music by Joshua Black Wilkins - http://www.joshuablackwilkins.com/ My fascination of coal and railroads made this ideal place for me to visit. McDowell County was once home to over 100,000 residents in the 1950's that helped set many coal mining production records. Through the 1960's and 1970's the demand for the county's metallurgical coal remained high. McDowell continued to lead the United States in total coal production. Increased mechanization of coal production had reduced the number of laborers employed, but miners enjoyed quality pay under improving conditions negotiated by the United Mine Workers. During the 1980's the central Appalachian region lost more than 70,000 coal mining jobs. Between 1981 and 1992, according to the U.S. Department of Energy and the United Mine Workers union, coal mining employment in the state of West Virginia decreased by more than 53%. No county in the Appalachian region was more severely distressed by these losses than McDowell County. According to the United States Census Bureau, in 1980, the rate of poverty in McDowell County was 23.5%. By 1990, the poverty rate in McDowell County had climbed to 37.7%, the highest rate of poverty for any county in West Virginia. By 1990, 50.3% of all children in McDowell County were living in families below the poverty level, up from 31.2% in 1980. The major losses in McDowell County during this period were the result of the closing of all mines and facilities operated by the United States Steel Corporation, terminating more than 1,200 jobs. Today the area is still one of the fastest declining populations.
Views: 54141 Travis Dewitz
knox mine disaster location and footage
 
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Please like & subscribe to JP Videos This video shows the location of the knox mine disaster and shows how it looks today as well as footage from 1959. enjoy Don't forget to like my page https://www.facebook.com/JPVideos81 At approximately 11:20 a.m., two laborers in the Pittston vein heard a sharp “popping” sound. They quickly called upon John Williams, the assistant foreman. The three employees hurried to escape and notify superintendent Robert Groves, who immediately ordered an evacuation, although he withheld the severity of the situation. Unfortunately, the other three men who were stationed in this vein could not escape in time and the fierce waters of the Susquehanna took their lives. While millions of gallons of water flooded into the mine, thirty-three men managed to catch the last elevators at the May shaft, but forty-five others remained trapped, desperately seeking their own outlet. During the first sixty four hours of the emergency, an estimated 2.7 million gallons of water per minute streamed underground from an enormous whirlpool near the riverbank. Down below, thirty-two men wandered in two separate groups until they managed to escape through the abandoned Eagle air shaft. Pennsylvania Coal Company surveyor, Joe Stella, led the first group of seven. He not only knew the mines well, but also possessed maps which allowed his group to find a direct course to the opening. The second group, led by Myron Thomas, consisted of twenty-five men who wandered for hours before they found their way to safety. Unfortunately, twelve of the original remaining bodies have never been recovered. Thousands of bails of hay and hundreds of railroad ties were also added. Culm, dirt, and rock along with over 50 coal and railroad cars barely stopped the river. Finally they diverted the river around Wintermoot Island by building dams at both ends of the island. Once they pumped the water out between the dams the size of the hole was evident. Tons of clay and rock were poured into the hole and a concrete cap was placed on top of the opening. They then pumped much of the water out of the mine to look for the 12 missing miners. How could this tragedy have happened? The original plan was to keep 50 feet of rock and coal between the workings and the river bottom. The Knox company wanted this to be lowered to 35 feet. Mine inspectors deemed this ok as it would be sufficient to stand up to the river. At this point the seam of coal sloped up towards the river in what is known as an anticline. Company owners kept pushing the miners closer and closer to the river bottom until the rock could no longer support the river. At the point where the river broke through the rock was only 5 to 6 feet thick! This disaster ended deep mining in the Wyoming valley as almost all of the coal company’s mines connected.
Views: 68965 JPVideos
Hard Coal: Last of the Bootleg Miners [Teaser Trailer] [Documentary]
 
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Hard Coal: Last of the Bootleg Miners WATCH IT FREE HERE: http://www.snagfilms.com/films/title/hard_coal_last_of_the_bootleg_miners?ph=0 A fatal mining accident in the hills of Pennsylvania, the subsequent suicide of the mine's owner, and the forced abandonment of eight of the last twelve surviving anthracite mines in the United States. These are the recent plagues that have defined the once proud and prosperous tradition of anthracite coal mining. They are also the tragedies that have prompted the drastic transformation of this feature documentary. HARD COAL: LAST OF THE BOOTLEG MINERS explores the near eradication of this group of hard-working Americans who merely wish, as their fathers and grandfathers before them, to provide for their families while helping their country develop a sustainable energy policy. They don't want to receive welfare. They don't want to go to prison. They don't want to die in an accident or by their own hands. They just want to mine the anthracite whose veins run deep through their native soil. WATCH IT FREE HERE: http://www.snagfilms.com/films/title/hard_coal_last_of_the_bootleg_miners?ph=0
Views: 5599 Scrapple TV
Coal Mining (1950)
 
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Location unspecified. Coal miners wearing helmets with lights on underground, one sets off an explosion. Miner winds up wire and walks along tunnel. He picks up pick axe, to chip at the side of the coal. CU Three miners crouching close together talking. The men start to pull away the coal using their pickaxes. The coal is thrown in chunks on to a moving conveyor belt. A new beam is put into position to secure the ceiling. Coal is shovelled on to a moving conveyor belt. Mute Col Neg FILM ID:3337.01 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 10680 British Pathé
Eckley Coal Breaker And Miners Village
 
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The Eckley Miners’ Village is located about 9 miles east of Hazleton, PA. It was built in 1854 by Sharpe, Leisinring, and Company (later the Sharpe, Weiss, and Company) which opened the Council Ridge Colliery. The coal land was leased from the Tench Coxe Estate in Philadelphia. The village was originally named Fillmore, after President Millard Fillmore, but was renamed Eckley in 1857, after the grandson of Tench Coxe. When the lease expired in 1875, the Coxe family operated or leased the colliery. The population of Eckley peaked at about 1,000 around 1870 and then declined as strip mining replaced underground mining. The residents reflected the waves of immigrants who came to work in the mines, Welsh, English, German, and Irish in the earlier years, and Eastern Europeans in later years. In 1969, the Huss Coal Company sold the town to the Anthracite Historical Site Museum, Inc. In 1971, it was deeded to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Today, it is administered by The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Eckley is open to the public year-round. Through preservation and restoration efforts, the Village seeks to portray the way-of-life of the anthracite coal miners and their families in the 19th Century.
Lost Coal with Lorena Beniquez
 
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Author and photographer Lorena Beniquez captures the oral and physical history of the anthracite region in her book, "Lost Coal Country of Northeastern Pennsylvania." Although the great-granddaughter of a coal miner, Beniquez knew little of her family’s story, so she set out on a journey to recover not only her own history but that of countless other families as well. Published by Arcadia, the book is part of the Images of Modern America series, so it’s part history, part photographic art, and part travel guide. Lorena visits many places in her book, including the site of the last coal breaker in America, scheduled for demolition soon. She also visits the spooky village of Centralia, abandoned 50 years ago when the the coal beneath caught fire. The fire continues and will burn for hundreds of years. Lorena writes about John Stella, an unsung hero who saved dozens of miners during the Knox Mine Disaster. Through shared stories , interviews and research, Lorena captures history of the anthracite region. She’s the great granddaughter of a coal miner, she’s discovered her own family’s story. Perhaps it will inspire you to learn your own family’s story and how it IS America’s history. From Lorena’s AMAZON page: http://amzn.to/2H8ax6T Lost Coal Country of Northeastern Pennsylvania documents the region’s disappearing anthracite history, which shaped the legacy of the United States of America and the industrial revolution. The coal mines, breakers, coal miners’ homes, and railroads have all steadily disappeared. With only one coal breaker left in the entire state, it was time to record what would soon be lost. Unfortunately, one piece of history that persists is underground fires that ravage communities like Centralia. Blazing for over 50 years, the flames of Centralia will not be doused anytime soon. Images featured in the book include the St. Nicholas coal breaker, Huber coal breaker, Steamtown National Historic Site, Lackawanna Coal Mine Tour, Eckley Miners’ Village, Centralia, and the Knox Mine disaster. A hybrid history book and travel guide, Lost Coal Country of Northeastern Pennsylvania is one final recounting of what is gone and what still remains. Thank You for Listening! Ways to share your thoughts: • Visit Robin’s website: https://robinvanauken.com • Send Robin an email: https://goo.gl/E9so9k • Be social with the link on Facebook: https://goo.gl/PZ8vHa • Connect on Twitter: https://goo.gl/rHMJqa • Follow on Pinterest: https://goo.gl/BWx6eB Ways to show your support: • Subscribe on iTunes: https://goo.gl/6LY3tY • Subscribe on Soundcloud: https://goo.gl/sSULvw
Views: 18 Robin Van Auken
Farmington Coal Mine Explosion West Virginia November 1968 MSHA
 
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At approximately 5:30 a.m. on Wednesday, November 20, 1968, an explosion occurred in the Consol No.9 Mine, Mountaineer Coal Company, Division of Consolidation Coal Company, Farmington, Marion County, West Virginia. There were 99 miners in the mine when the explosion occurred, 78 of whom died as a result of the explosion. The other 21 miners survived the explosion and escaped to the surface. The mine was sealed at its surface openings on November 30, 1968. Damage to the mine in the explosion area was extensive, requiring loading of rock falls, replacement of ventilation and transportation facilities, and in some cases new mine entries to bypass extensively caved areas. Investigative activities were continued, in cooperation with the Company, State, and United Mine Workers of America (UMW A) organizations, as mine areas were recovered. Between 1969 and 1978, the bodies of 59 victims were recovered and brought to the surface. Recovery operations ceased and all entrances to the mine were permanently sealed in November 1978, leaving 19 victims buried in the mine and leaving some areas of the mine unexplored. Lessons learned during early evaluation of this disaster were incorporated into the Federal Coal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1969. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". For more on the history of coal mine safety, go to http://www.msha.gov/AboutMSHA.HTM . This was clipped from the 2004 video, We Are ... MSHA, by the Mine Safety and Health Administration and available at the MSHA website and the Internet Archive.
Views: 32599 markdcatlin
Open Cast Coal Mining Near Leeds (1947)
 
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Temple Newsam, Nr Leeds, Yorkshire. Open cast coal mining LS Pan of a field. LS CU Cranes operating scoops which shovel the coal from a surface seam and load it onto lorries. FILM ID:1191.3 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 1672 British Pathé
Historic Coal Mining Scenes
 
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Description: Coal mining has a rich and diverse history in communities across the United States. These images, gathered from OSMRE’s archives, show a glimpse at the process and production of coal during the early industrialization phase of resource extraction.
Views: 108 OSMRE
Argonaut Mine Disaster - Ephemera
 
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On August 27, 1922 a fire ensued in the Argonaut Mine that trapped 47 miners a mile underground. Over a span of 26 days the lives of everyone in Jackson, California would change forever. What effect does this 95 year old disaster still have on the community of Jackson today?
Views: 1309 Ephemera
Centralia - Full Documentary
 
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The documentary about Centralia, "The town that was" I do not own the video. For more info: thetownthatwas.com CNN article: https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/pennsylvania-graffiti-highway/index.html Let me know if you have some recent footage from Centralia on YouTube and I will link it/pin it. Thanks.
Views: 2613258 A Andreassen
Idaho's Mining History
 
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Walking around and viewing some of the old mines around Mackay, Idaho was a larger than life experience. #dualsport #adventurerides #motorcycles #offroad #adventuremotorcycles #dirtbikes #enduro
COAL MINERS & MINING 1930s GERMAN EDUCATIONAL FILM PART 2 75644
 
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This 1930s German silent educational film shows miners working in the depths of a large coal mine, and their routine underground pulling coal into a long conveyer belt. An underground train system is also seen pulling ore cars out of the mine and into a massive elevator for transport to the surface. Air hammers and other equipment for excavation is also shown. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 2961 PeriscopeFilm
Coal Mining Child Labor
 
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coal mining child labor
Views: 16761 flash00777X
welsh valleys coal miners video
 
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In this welsh valleys coal miners video it explains how hard it was to work underground, in confined spaces and light was very limited.
Views: 5117 36524gamer
A Brief History of Coal Mining
 
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We briefly explain the history of coal. From the cave man days, to present day. For more information on coal, and the debate of whether it is a logical energy source please visit: http://www.advantagesanddisadvantagesofcoal.com/
Views: 6385 coaldebate
Ukraine to buy 700,000 tons of American anthracite coal
 
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Ukraine has agreed to a deal to buy coal from the United States for the first time in its history. The first delivery is expected in September. Washington has described the deal as a means of undercutting the influence of Russia over its European neighbors. Lena Savchuk has more in this report. Watch Live: http://www.presstv.com/live.html Twitter: http://twitter.com/PressTV LiveLeak: http://www.liveleak.com/c/PressTV Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PRESSTV Google+: http://plus.google.com/+VideosPTV Instagram: http://instagram.com/presstvchannel Dailymotion: http://www.dailymotion.com/presstv
Views: 1902 PressTV
The Extraordinary Journey: The Eastern Europeans of Northeastern Pennsylvania
 
02:25:45
Between 1880 and 1930, hundreds of thousands of eastern European immigrants settled in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The Extraordinary Journey presents the stories of where they came from, why they left the "Old Country", how they got to America, the life they created in the anthracite coal country after they arrived, and their extraordinary ethnic legacy forged from that which they cherished most - family, faith, and freedom. The memory of their time has come to define the lives of many Americans today. The three-episode documentary contains dozens of insightful interviews with Polish, Slovak, Ukrainian, Lithuanian, and Hungarian immigrants, their children, and scholars of this period in American history. These funny, tragic, and deeply intimate memories are visualized by hundreds of archival images selected from the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, the Library of Congress and the National Archives. From pierogi to polka to pysanky, eastern European culture reflects humble origins, profound piety, and intense ethnic pride. The Extraordinary Journey celebrates and preserves northeastern Pennsylvania's eastern European heritage through a poignant blend of first-person story telling, never-before-seen images and insightful humanist commentary, and honors the courageous character our ancestors possessed to create a finer life for us today. WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY GREG MATKOSKY EXECUTIVE PRODUCER THOMAS M CURRA PRODUCED BY GREG MATKOSKY AND THOMAS M CURRA EDITED BY KRIS HENDRICKSON DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY GREG MATKOSKY NARRATED BY PAUL PLISHKA TOTAL RUNNING TIME 146 MINUTES
United Mine Workers of America, Coal City Local Union 1147
 
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United Mine Workers of America Honor Roll, honoring Veterans from the Coal City Local. Coal City, Gardner, Braidwood and surrounding areas were home to several large coal mines.
Views: 28 willcountynews
Opencast Coal Mining
 
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Wimpey Mining was one of the United Kingdoms major Opencast Coal Mining Contractors with more than fifty years experience in the Opencast Coal mining Industry, this all ended when George Wimpey PLC sold Wimpey Mining to Miller Mining 1996, this short photo show covers four Opencast Coal Mining sites worked by Wimpey Mining in the Gwendraeth Valley West Wales and covering a period from 1978 to 1995
Views: 25434 Richard Green
Shamokin Pennsylvania By Car
 
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I’m hesitant to put stuff like this up, as I value my online anonymity. Nonetheless, for all I write online, people who like what I write—or at least are intrigued—deserve to learn a little bit more about me. My dad's side of the family comes from Shamokin—I’m a descendant of Irish-American coal miners. And if you've never been to Shamokin, it's this Victorian-built town in Pennsylvania Appalachia about 70 miles north of Harrisburg. It's hey-day was arguably the late 1930's. Today, it's nothing but a shadow of what once had been. The town is now known for “State Correctional Institution, Coal Township”—the state penitentiary next door, and arguably owes all its present income (what little it gets) to the Pennsylvania prison system. Likewise, I really don’t want to try to make myself any “old man historian” of anthracite coal mining history. My father wound-up drumming that into my head after he retired—endless talks about Frank Gowen and the lynching of the Molly Maguires. God, did I ever get sick of listening to that. “The handprint on the wall of the old jail!”—Christ, after my father went senile he’d try to talk about that damn handprint 10 times a day. Instead, I focus on the social class system that existed during my father’s upbringing in the 1930’s (which may also be sleep-inducing, yet through my father it became part of my own life). If anyone wants to talk about the Molly Maguires, I believe there’s a movie about that sort of thing starring Sean Connery—watch it, then find someone to discuss it with who isn’t me.
Views: 327 Fred Dietz
125 Years of Struggle and Glory
 
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Video played at the UMWA 55th Consecutive Constitutional Convention. The video was created to educate the delegation about the early history of the UMWA. Currently, content for umwa.org history page. http://bit.ly/umwahistoryvideo.
The Mine Wars | PBS America
 
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Premieres 9pm, Wednesday 29 June on Freesat 156 | Sky 534 | Virgin Media 276 Following its European premiere at the Sheffield Doc Fest, this documentary recalls the struggle for trade union recognition by mine workers in West Virginia, a battle that lasted two decades. At the beginning of the 20th century, coal was the engine of American industrial progress. The coal industry employed over 700,000 men, yet few Americans gave much thought to the price paid by those whose working days were spent underground. With entire communities owned by the mining companies, conditions and pay were strictly controlled. The stage was set for conflict, and the spark that ignited the flame arrived in 1901 in the shape of Mary Harris "Mother" Jones, an outspoken labour organiser and activist. West Virginian miners went on strike in 1902, with the employees demanding shorter workdays, higher wages and recognition of the union. It was to be the first of a series of industrial disputes that frequently erupted into violence, with successive state governors being forced to declare martial law as the coal companies engaged paramilitary forces to combat the strikers, who themselves were heavily armed. Superior force was eventually to prevail, however, and in the early 1920s the strikes eventually petered out. It would not be until 1933 that Congress passed legislation guaranteeing the workers' right to unionise.
Views: 2730 PBS America
Who are the breaker boys?
 
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Site Administrator at Eckley Miners' Village, Bode Morin PhD, educates you on the history of the breaker boys.
Views: 1252 MrStefannews
Pit Ponies
 
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A selection of photos of these hard working Ponies a dedication to them many Ponies began to be used underground, often replacing child or female labour, as distances from pit head to coal face became greater. The first known recorded use in Britain was in the Durham coalfield in 1750; however, the use of ponies was never common in the United States, though ponies were used in Appalachian coal fields in the mid 20th century. The last pony mine in the United States closed in 1971. At the peak in 1913, there were 70,000 ponies underground in Britain. In later years, mechanical haulage was quickly introduced on the main underground roads replacing the pony hauls and ponies tended to be confined to the shorter runs from coal face to main road (known in North East England as "putting") which were more difficult to mechanise. As of 1984, 55 ponies were still at use with the National Coal Board in Britain, chiefly at the modern pit in Ellington, Northumberland. Probably the last colliery horse to work underground in a British coal mine, 'Robbie', was retired from Pant y Gasseg, near Pontypool, in May 1999.
Views: 19503 Polhigey
Drawing the Line At Pittston
 
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News You Can Use: Fall 1990 #42 This program chronicles the year-long miners strike against the Pittston Mine Company in western Virginia. Though a landmark event in the history of labor (one of the largest labor disputes in the last fifty years), this working people's strike garnered little attention in the mainstream media. Using interviews with striking miners and their families, members of the clergy, labor leaders, students, and others affected by the strike this program documents the gradual political awakening of a community whose livelihood is threatened by corporate greed. Run time 28:00 Produced by Paper Tiger TV (NY, NY)
Views: 1206 Deep Dish TV
American Miners' Leader John L. Lewis Signs U.S. Coal 'peace' (1951)
 
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Washington. American commentary - the coal operators and the miners chiefs led by John L Lewis meet to sign a contract ending 9 months strife in the coal fields, culminating in the month long soft coal strike. Lewis signs for the miners, who stayed out despite the invoking of the Taft-Hartley Act. George Love signs for the operators. MS. John L. Lewis walking into building. MS. John L. Lewis walking along passage. LS. miner's chiefs and operators at long table. CU. Lewis signing the contract (US coal 'peace'). MS. Lewis putting down pen. CU. John L. Lewis speaking. (nat. snd.) 'The United Mineworkers of America has again accomplished the impossible. They have again negotiated an agreement against the greatest concentrated opposition that has ever faced a Labour Union or a Voluntary Association of Workers. They have again negotiated an agreement, which will run until July 1st. 1952. We have made new gains. We have benefited all labour, and we have benefited all citizens who live under our flag. Thank you.' MS. Lewis shaking hands with George Love member of US board of inquiry for coal strike. (Comb. F.G.) FILM ID:2557.23 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 120 British Pathé
John L Lewis and the 1919 United Mine Workers Strike
 
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In November, 1919, Acting President John L. Lewis of the United Mine Workers led 600,000 miners in a five week strike that crippled the bituminous coal industry and the nation as well. The strike was in direct defiance of a court injunction against such action and Woodrow Wilson denounced Lewis as a dictator. This was John L. Lewis' first clash with a United States president.
Views: 968 Ed L