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Lecture 23: Symmetric Key Establishment and Kerberos by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com
key distribution problem in cryptography
 
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Data sharing problems in cryptography
Views: 3782 nirmal jeyaraj
Entity Authentication and Symmetric Key Establishment - Bart Preneel
 
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Entity Authentication and Symmetric Key Establishment, by Bart Preneel Authentication methods are based on something known, owned, biometric, location or evidence of trusted third party authentication. + A password is a case of something known. Passwords are a vulnerable, but cheap and convenient way of authenticating an entity. Several techniques to augment their effectiveness are in use including challenge-response and one-time passwords. + Secure devices such as smart cards and USB tokens often combine the 'owned' with the 'known', since secret keys are locked in the token with a password or PIN code. However, within the broad category of secure tokens, trustworthiness is variable, depending on whether keys can be extracted, passwords can be eavesdropped or the device can be tampered with. + Biometry identifies a person via physical characteristics. + Location is often used as the sole authentication factor, but is insecure given the relative ease of spoofing IP or MAC addresses. + Multi-factor authentication is stronger than single-factor. + The Kerberos protocol uses a key distribution-based authentication server. Service consumers must authenticate with a central server to obtain a secret session key with service providers. Such schemes require a single sign-on to access servers across a trust domain. While public key cryptography is well suited to entity authentication, performance constraints often mandate a symmetric algorithm for encrypting data passed between systems. Key establishment should be linked to authentication, so that a party has assurances that a key is only shared with the authenticated party. The Diffie-Hellman key agreement protocol underlies a host of current technologies such as STS (Station-to-Station protocol) and IKE. Learning objectives Gain insight into + entity authentication protocols, + the benefits and limitations of authentication factors, + key establishment protocols, + why and how to use authentication servers. This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel in Leuven on Tuesday February 11th at SecAppDev 2014. Professor Bart Preneel heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group at KU Leuven. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 1366 secappdev.org
Key Distribution Center (KDC)
 
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This video is part of the Udacity course "Intro to Information Security". Watch the full course at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud459
Views: 11961 Udacity
SSL Certificate Explained
 
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Views: 803991 dtommy1979
What is EPHEMERAL KEY? What does EPHEMERAL KEY mean? EPHEMERAL KEY meaning & explanation
 
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What is EPHEMERAL KEY? What does EPHEMERAL KEY mean? EPHEMERAL KEY meaning - EPHEMERAL KEY definition - EPHEMERAL KEY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A cryptographic key is called ephemeral if it is generated for each execution of a key establishment process. In some cases ephemeral keys are used more than once, within a single session (e.g., in broadcast applications) where the sender generates only one ephemeral key pair per message and the private key is combined separately with each recipient's public key. Contrast with a static key. Private ephemeral key agreement key: Private ephemeral key agreement keys are the private keys of asymmetric key pairs that are used only once to establish one or more keys (e.g., key wrapping keys, data encryption keys, or MAC keys) and, optionally, other keying material (e.g., Initialization Vectors). Public ephemeral key agreement key: Public ephemeral key agreement keys are the public keys of asymmetric key pairs that are used in a single key establishment transaction to establish one or more keys (e.g., key wrapping keys, data encryption keys, or MAC keys) and, optionally, other keying material (e.g., Initialization Vectors).
Views: 812 The Audiopedia
Kerberos - authentication protocol
 
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At 4:30: A mistake: step 3: When the file server gets the token, it "decrypts" (not "encrypts") the token with the secret key shared with TGS. In Greek mythology, Kerberos is a dog with three heads. But today I will not talk about the dog. Kerberos is an authentication protocol for client/server applications. I will demonstrate with an example how Kerberos works. Keep in mind, Kerberos implements private key encryption. Playlist: Basic Cryptography https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vk3py9M2IfE&list=PLSNNzog5eyduN6o4e6AKFHekbH5-37BdV Advanced Cryptography: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmA2QWSLSPg&list=PLSNNzog5eydtwsdT__t5WtRgvpfMzpTc7 Please leave comments, questions and Please subscribe to my channel Many thanks, Sunny Classroom
Views: 44835 Sunny Classroom
PCI Requirement 3.6.3 Secure Cryptographic Key Storage
 
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If your organization is storing PCI-related data using encryption, those keys must be stored securely, as PCI Requirement 3.6.3 commands, “Secure cryptographic key storage.” If your key storage is securely stored, has the appropriate protections, and access is limited to the fewest number of people and locations as possible, you prevent your organization from being susceptible to an attack. The PCI DSS further explains, “The encryption solution must store keys securely, for example, by encrypting them with a key-encrypting key. Storing keys without proper protection could provide access to attackers, resulting in the decryption and exposure of cardholder data.” You assessor should test your compliance with PCI Requirement 3.6.3 by examining your organization’s key management program and its procedures and methods to verify that they specifically outline and implement that secure storage of keys. If you store, process, or transmit cardholder data, interact with payment card data in any way, or have the ability to impact someone else’s cardholder information or the security of that information, you are subject to comply with the PCI DSS. This exclusive video series, PCI Demystified, was developed to assist your organization in understanding what the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is, who it applies to, what the specific requirements are, and what your organizations needs to know and do to become compliant. Learn more at https://kirkpatrickprice.com/video/pci-requirement-3-6-3-secure-cryptographic-key-storage/ Video Transcription Once again, if you’re encrypting information, whether this be PII, PHI, PCI-related data, if you have implemented encryption as a part of this methodology, we want to make sure that those keys you’re using are stored securely. We want to make sure that access has been limited to the fewest possible number of individuals. You need to have protections around them so that in the event that somebody should compromise the server, they don’t gain access to the encryption keys or the decryption keys themselves. So, your assessor is going to be working with you and asking how you’ve gone about doing that. They’re going to be looking at your documented procedures for secure key distribution and secure key storage and how that rolls out. If you have an HSM in a FIPS-compliant device, the controls that are there are pretty much established by the technology. In short, once again, where you are storing these keys, they need to be stored securely. Stay Connected Twitter: https://twitter.com/KPAudit LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/kirkpatrickprice-llc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kirkpatrickprice/ More Free Resources PCI Demystified: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/pci-demystified/ Blog: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/blog/ Webinars: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/webinars/ Videos: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/video/ White Papers: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/white-papers/ About Us KirkpatrickPrice is a licensed CPA firm, PCI QSA, and a HITRUST CSF Assessor, registered with the PCAOB, providing assurance services to over 600 clients in more than 48 states, Canada, Asia, and Europe. The firm has over 12 years of experience in information security and compliance assurance by performing assessments, audits, and tests that strengthen information security and internal controls. KirkpatrickPrice most commonly provides advice on SOC 1, SOC 2, HIPAA, HITRUST CSF, PCI DSS, ISO 27001, FISMA, and CFPB frameworks. For more about KirkpatrickPrice: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/ Contact us today: 800-770-2701 https://kirkpatrickprice.com/contact/
Views: 264 KirkpatrickPrice
Key Management and Distribution (CSS322, L21, Y14)
 
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Introduction to key management; session and master keys; number of keys needed; decentralised key distribution. Course material via: http://sandilands.info/sgordon/teaching
Views: 3055 Steven Gordon
Transparent Data Encryption in SQL Server 2012 - Demonstration
 
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You can take several precautions to help secure the database such as designing a secure system, encrypting confidential assets, and building a firewall around the database servers. However, in a scenario where the physical media (such as drives or backup tapes) are stolen, a malicious party can just restore or attach the database and browse the data. One solution is to encrypt the sensitive data in the database and protect the keys that are used to encrypt the data with a certificate. This prevents anyone without the keys from using the data, but this kind of protection must be planned in advance. Transparent data encryption (TDE) performs real-time I/O encryption and decryption of the data and log files. The encryption uses a database encryption key (DEK), which is stored in the database boot record for availability during recovery. The DEK is a symmetric key secured by using a certificate stored in the master database of the server or an asymmetric key protected by an EKM module. TDE protects data "at rest", meaning the data and log files. It provides the ability to comply with many laws, regulations, and guidelines established in various industries. This enables software developers to encrypt data by using AES and 3DES encryption algorithms without changing existing applications. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb934049.aspx
Views: 30794 Jasmin Azemović
How SSL works tutorial - with HTTPS example
 
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How SSL works by leadingcoder. This is a full tutorial how to setup SSL that requires client certificate for reference: http://www.windowsecurity.com/articles/Client-Certificate-Authentication-IIS6.html .
Views: 1318965 tubewar
NON INTERACTIVE KEY ESTABLISHMENT FOR BUNDLE SECURITY PROTOCOL OF SPACE DTN'S
 
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The objective of this paper is to create a efficient mechanism to exchange the non interactive key exchange protocol and to schedule the keys when and to whom it must be sent properly.Authentication assurance and key distribution in a non interactive manner .
Views: 53 ELANGO PREM
Public Key Infrastructure Fundamentals - Bart Preneel
 
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The function of a public key infrastructure (PKI) is to ensure secure delivery and management of public keys. Alternative trust models lead to different key architectures. Public keys are published by means of digitally signed certificates. A private key may be compromised, in which case the certificate containing the corresponding public key must be revoked. Many revocation methods are in current use. Publication of Certificate Revocation Lists (CRLs) and checking with an Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) responder are best established. Learning objectives + learn the components of a public key infrastructure. + understand key delivery and management mechanisms. A lecture by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2013 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the K.U.Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 50341 secappdev.org
Location-Based Key Management Strong Against Insider Threats in Wireless Sensor Networks
 
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Location-Based Key Management Strong Against Insider Threats in Wireless Sensor Networks To get this project in ONLINE or through TRAINING Sessions, Contact: JP INFOTECH, Old No.31, New No.86, 1st Floor, 1st Avenue, Ashok Pillar, Chennai -83.Landmark: Next to Kotak Mahendra Bank. Pondicherry Office: JP INFOTECH, #37, Kamaraj Salai,Thattanchavady, Puducherry -9.Landmark: Next to VVP Nagar Arch. Mobile: (0) 9952649690, Email: [email protected], web: http://www.jpinfotech.org To achieve secure communications in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), sensor nodes (SNs) must establish secret shared keys with neighboring nodes. Moreover, those keys must be updated by defeating the insider threats of corrupted nodes. In this paper, we propose a location-based key management scheme for WSNs, with special considerations of insider threats. After reviewing existing location-based key management schemes and studying their advantages and disadvantages, we selected location dependent key management (LDK) as a suitable scheme for our study. To solve a communication interference problem in LDK and similar methods, we have devised a new key revision process that incorporates grid-based location information. We also propose a key establishment process using grid information. Furthermore, we construct key update and revocation processes to effectively resist inside attackers. For analysis, we conducted a rigorous simulation and confirmed that our method can increase connectivity while decreasing the compromise ratio when the minimum number of common keys required for key establishment is high. When there was a corrupted node leveraging insider threats, it was also possible to effectively rekey every SN except for the corrupted node using our method. Finally, the hexagonal deployment of anchor nodes could reduce network costs.
Views: 96 jpinfotechprojects
Lecture 24: Man-in-the-middle Attack, Certificates and PKI by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com
Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol
 
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ISAKMP is a protocol defined by RFC 2408 for establishing Security Associations and cryptographic keys in an Internet environment. ISAKMP only provides a framework for authentication and key exchange and is designed to be key exchange independent; protocols such as Internet Key Exchange and Kerberized Internet Negotiation of Keys provide authenticated keying material for use with ISAKMP. For example: IKE describes a protocol using part of Oakley and part of SKEME in conjunction with ISAKMP to obtain authenticated keying material for use with ISAKMP, and for other security associations such as AH and ESP for the IETF IPsec DOI This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1830 Audiopedia
05 Key Distribution
 
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http://www.olivenutrition.net
Views: 3498 Synplify
Certificates in Cisco UC
 
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In this video, I'll explain what certificates are, what a CSR is, what information is in a certificate / CSR, what is a CA, how to handle them in various products, and special use cases for MRA, Jabber and upgrades. This is not a deep technical dive into certificates and cryptography, but focused more on a basic understanding of what they are, how they work, and how to work with them. The concepts that I explain can be used for other technologies that also use certificates to establish a secure communication. The main goal of this video is to also explain the advantages of using CA signed certificates Vs. self-signed certificates. Related videos I've made: Cisco Meeting Management (CMM) installation, configuration and demo https://youtu.be/KyV8kIndDAU How to sign certificates with a Microsoft CA https://youtu.be/SiCfhqlJyZI For anyone interested in learning more about certificates and cryptography, here are some links, and they are just a small fraction of the information you can find online. (I might provide a link to a .txt file due to the description size limitation) The use of any of the following links is at your own risk and responsibility. Private keys https://www.digicert.com/blog/where-is-your-private-key/ https://www.sslshopper.com/certificate-key-matcher.html https://www.sslchecker.com/matcher https://www.namecheap.com/support/knowledgebase/article.aspx/9834/69/how-can-i-find-the-private-key-for-my-ssl-certificate CSR https://www.sslshopper.com/what-is-a-csr-certificate-signing-request.html https://www.globalsign.com/en/blog/what-is-a-certificate-signing-request-csr/ Certificates and extensions https://knowledge.digicert.com/solution/SO18140.html https://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/en/SSKTMJ_9.0.1/admin/conf_keyusageextensionsandextendedkeyusage_r.html https://www.sslsupportdesk.com/details-digital-certificate-mean/ https://www.secureblackbox.com/kb/help/ref_howto_pki_cert_checkkeyusage.html https://www.godaddy.com/help/what-is-an-ssl-certificate-542 https://www.globalsign.com/en/ssl-information-center/what-is-an-ssl-certificate/ http://www.zytrax.com/tech/survival/ssl.html https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb123848%28v=exchg.65%29.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396 https://www.sslsupportdesk.com/details-digital-certificate-mean/ TLS https://hpbn.co/transport-layer-security-tls/ https://www.ssl.com/article/ssl-tls-handshake-overview/ https://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/en/SSFKSJ_7.1.0/com.ibm.mq.doc/sy10660_.htm CAs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Certificate_authority https://www.globalsign.com/en/ssl-information-center/what-are-certification-authorities-trust-hierarchies/ https://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/definition/certificate-authority OpenSSL CSR Wizard https://www.digicert.com/easy-csr/openssl.htm Cisco references Unified Communication Cluster Setup with CA-Signed Multi-Server Subject Alternate Name Configuration Example https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/unified-communications/unified-communications-manager-callmanager/118731-configure-san-00.html CUCM Security By Default and ITL Operation and Troubleshooting https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/voice-unified-communications/unified-communications-manager-callmanager/116232-technote-sbd-00.html CUCM Certificate Management and Change Notification https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/unified-communications/unified-communications-manager-callmanager/210541-CUCM-Certificate-Management-and-Change-N.html Security Guide for Cisco Unified Communications Manager, Release 11.5(1)SU3, Chapter: Security Overview https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/security/11_5_1_SU3/cucm_b_security-guide-1151su3/cucm_b_security-guide-1151su3_chapter_01.html#CUCM_RF_S85BF603_00 High Level View of Certificates and Authorities in CUCM https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/voice-unified-communications/unified-communications-manager-callmanager/115957-high-level-view-ca-00.html CUCM Certificate Regeneration/Renewal Process https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/unified-communications/unified-communications-manager-callmanager/200199-CUCM-Certificate-Regeneration-Renewal-Pr.html Planning Guide for Cisco Jabber 12.0, Chapter: Security and Certificates https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/voice_ip_comm/jabber/12_0/cjab_b_planning-guide-for-cisco-jabber-12/cjab_b_planning-guide-for-cisco-jabber-12_chapter_0111.html On-Premises Deployment for Cisco Jabber 12.0, Chapter: Configure Certificate Validation https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/voice_ip_comm/jabber/12_0/cjab_b_on-premises-deployment-for-cisco-jabber-12/cjab_b_on-premises-deployment-for-cisco-jabber-12_chapter_01110.html I also encourage you to review my FAQ, I cover a lot of products in it: http://docwiki.cisco.com/wiki/Unified_Communications_FAQ Any questions, comments, etc. you can reach me at [email protected] or leave a comment below.
Views: 1229 smargada
Lecture 22: MAC (Message Authentication Codes) and HMAC by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com
Oakley
 
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Join Commander Cypher as he completes his mission to deliver important equipment to a distant colony. Following the steps of the cyber security protocol Key Management: Oakley, Cypher must negotiate with the Leader of the colony to establish ways in which to achieve secure communication. Be sure to check us out at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100012779835604&fref=ts Twitter: https://twitter.com/CLjmu Cypher Website: http://www.cms.livjm.ac.uk/cypher/ Music: Main Story - 'The Lift' - Incomptech.com Explanation - 'Deliberate Thought' - Incomptech.com
Views: 1165 CYPHER LJMU
ZigBee Exploited The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly
 
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by Tobias Zillner & Sebastian Strobl ZigBee is one of the most widespread communication standards used in the Internet of Things and especially in the area of smart homes. If you have, for example, a smart light bulb at home, the chance is very high that you are actually using ZigBee. Popular lighting applications, such as Philips Hue or Osram Lightify are based on this standard. Usually, IoT devices have very limited processing and energy resources, and therefore not capable of implementing well-known communication standards, such as Wifi. ZigBee is, however, an open, publicly available alternative that enables wireless communication for such devices. ZigBee also provides security services for key establishment, key transport, frame protection, and device management that are based on established cryptographic algorithms. So, is a ZigBee home automation network with applied security and smart home communication protected? No, absolutely not. Due to interoperability and compatibility requirements, as well as the application of legacy security concepts, it is possible to compromise ZigBee networks and take over control of all connected devices. For example, it is entirely possible for an external party to gain control over every smart light bulb that supports the ZigBee Light Link profile. This is made possible because the initial key transport is done in an unsecured way, and support of this weak key transport is, in fact, even required by the standard itself. Due to these shortfalls and limitations created by the manufacturers themselves, the security risk in this last tier communication standard can be considered as very high. This talk will provide an overview of the actual applied security measures in ZigBee, highlight the included weaknesses, and show practical exploitations of actual product vulnerabilities, as well as our recently developed ZigBee security-testing framework tool.
Views: 11193 Black Hat
ISAMKP
 
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Join Commander Cypher, as he returns home after a voyage into the deep recesses of space! But before he can touch-down and enjoy the benefits of Earths gravity, he must first re-establish communication with his ground control. Following the steps of the cyber security protocol Key Management: ISAKMP, Cypher established communication procedures that will be used to help guide him back home. Be sure to check us out at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100012779835604&fref=ts Twitter: https://twitter.com/CLjmu Cypher Website: http://www.cms.livjm.ac.uk/cypher/ Music: Main Story - 'The Lift' - Incomptech.com Explanation - 'Deliberate Thought' - Incomptech.com
Views: 1036 CYPHER LJMU
Key management and Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (CSS322, Lecture 21, 2013)
 
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Key management and distribution. Man-in-the-middle attack. Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange. Lecture 20 of CSS322 Security and Cryptography at Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology, Thammasat University. Given on 13 February 2014 at Bangkadi, Pathumthani, Thailand by Steven Gordon. Course material via: http://sandilands.info/sgordon/teaching
Views: 807 Steven Gordon
CSS322, Lecture 21, 25 Jan 2013 - Key Management with Symmetric Encryption
 
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Lecture 21 of CSS322 Security and Cryptography at Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology, Thammasat University. Given on 25 January 2013 at Bangkadi, Pathumthani, Thailand by Steven Gordon. http://sandilands.info/sgordon/teaching
Views: 824 Steven Gordon
How do two parties exchange keys to communicate securely?
 
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While asymmetric (public-key) encryption does allow two parties to communicate security without exchanging keys, asymmetric encryption requires expensive computation for each message. Symmetric key algorithms are much more efficient. As a result, the two techniques are usually applied to establish and maintain a secure connection. Asymmetric encryption is used to protect the initial part of the connection where symmetric keys are exchanged. Once communicating parties agree on symmetric keys, symmetric encryption is used for the remainder of the communication. Credits: Talking: Geoffrey Challen (Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, University at Buffalo). Producing: Greg Bunyea (Undergraduate, Computer Science and Engineering, University at Buffalo). Part of the https://www.internet-class.org online internet course. A blue Systems Research Group (https://blue.cse.buffalo.edu) production.
Views: 229 internet-class
Cryptographic Keys and Digital Certificates - 8
 
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Welcome to the Venafi CISO podcast series where we get insights and viewpoints from Tammy Moskites, Venafi CISO. Tammy, what role do keys and certificates play and why are attacks on trust increasing? Why do enterprises not recognize the very real threat attacks on the trust established by keys and certificates present today?
Views: 121 Venafi
Key Distribution and Certification Authority
 
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Cyber Attack Countermeasures Module 4 Overview of Public Key Cryptographic Methods This module introduces the basics of public key cryptography including an overview of SSL and CA applications. Learning Objectives • Discuss CBC mode cryptography • Describe conventional crypto scaling • Identify the basics of public key cryptography including secrecy and digital signing • Examine Diffie Hellman Key Exchange and its contributions to security • Explain key distribution techniques including CA protocols • Summarize SSL and how it is implemented in browsers • Examine the history of cryptographic invention in the US and UK Subscribe at: https://www.coursera.org/learn/intro-cyber-attacks/home/welcome https://www.coursera.org
Views: 45 intrigano
A New Way In: Encryption Keys and Digital Certificates
 
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Keys and certificates are a new attack vector that cyber criminals are taking advantage of every day. Unfortunately organizations are unable to detect or respond to these type of attacks because keys and certificates have become blindly trusted.
Views: 2758 Venafi
14. SSL and HTTPS
 
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MIT 6.858 Computer Systems Security, Fall 2014 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-858F14 Instructor: Nickolai Zeldovich In this lecture, Professor Zeldovich discusses how to cryptographically protect network communications, as well as how to integrate cryptographic protection of network traffic into the web security model. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 59331 MIT OpenCourseWare
Comptia Security + Training
 
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The CareerSaver Security+ Full Training Video 11Hours of training covering ; 1. Mitigating Threats Part1 a. Performing Core Maintenance b. Manage Viruses and Spyware 2. Mitigating Threats Part2 a. Secure Web Browsers b. Identify Social Engineering Threats 3. Authentication Systems a. Identify the Purpose of Authentication b. Compare Hash Methods c. Identify and Compare Authentication Systems 4. Cryptography Part1 a. Examine Symmetric Cryptography b. Ciphers and Hash Algorithms 5. Cryptography Part2 a. Examine Asymmetric Cryptography b. Public Key Cryptography 6. Message Security Part1 a. Secure email Services b. Email vulnerabilities c. SPAM 7. Message Security Part2 a. Configure Secure Messaging & Peer to Peer Communication b. Instant Messaging Security and Vulnerabilities c. Hosts file redirection, Intrusion Detection and Packet Sniffing 8. Access Controls a. Use Biometric Systems b. Establish Physical Access Security c. Secure Peripherals and Computer Components d. Secure Storage Devices 9. User & Role Based Security a. Create Local Group Policies b. Secure File and Print Resources c. Security Templates d. Access Control Models 10. Network Security a. Describe Common Networking Devices b. Consider Secure Network Design c. Configure Internet Explorer d. Examine the Benefits of Virtualization 11. Public Key Infrastructure a. Examine Key Management and Certificate Lifecycles b. Install Certificate Server c. Enable Secure Web Communications 12. Ports & Protocols a. Identify TCP/IP Protocols and Network Services b. Examine IPv4 and IPv6 c. CIDR & NAT d. Mitigate Protocol-based Attacks 13. Audit Logging & Monitoring a. Log Server and Application Data b. Monitor Systems and Applications c. Event Viewer d. Performance Monitors, Counters and Objects 14. Organizational Security a. Create Organizational Policies b. Identify Educational and Training Needs c. Proper Disposal or Destruction of IT Equipment d. Password Management 15. Remote Access Security a. Compare RADIUS, TACACS, 802.1x Authentication Systems b. Examine VPN Technologies and Tunneling Protocols 16. Wireless Security a. Configure a Wireless Router for Security b. Configure Mobile Devices for Security 17. Vulnerability Testing a. Conduct Risk Assessments and Scan for Vulnerabilities b. Compare HIDS and NIDS and Install an NIDS c. Investigate the Computer Forensics Process 18. Business Continuity a. Create a Redundancy Plan and Prepare for Natural Disasters b. Create and Store Backups / Backup Methods c. Fault Tolerant Systems / RAID d. Explain the Importance of Environmental Controls
Views: 4207 CareerSaverCom
BUD17-203 Universal Keyring: The time has come
 
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"Session ID: BUD17-203 Session Name: Universal Keyring - The Time has Come - BUD17-203 Speaker: Anders Rundgren Track: Security ★ Session Summary ★ The SKS/KeyGen2 project is about establishing an security architecture, provisioning and management scheme for cryptographic keys targeting a wide variety of applications including on-line banking, payments, e-government access, and enterprise login. A TEE (possibly aided by a local security processor) is a core component of the envisioned architecture. In order to enable easy enrollment, a browser-based provisioning protocol is another core component. Since a cryptographic key (unlike a file), usually represents a relationship to a remote party which also typically imply a policy for ""their"" keys, the system supports key ACLs which through an OS/TEE layer governs which applications a key may be used with. A consequence of this arrangement is that cryptographic keys become first-class OS objects like files. The protocol and basic key store is already running as an application which is used for testing and evaluation. What's missing is the OS/TEE/Browser integration, something which requires a set of rather different --------------------------------------------------- ★ Resources ★ Event Page: http://connect.linaro.org/resource/bud17/bud17-203/ Presentation: https://www.slideshare.net/linaroorg/bud17203-universal-keyring-the-time-has-come Video: https://youtu.be/PvySBboUwPM --------------------------------------------------- ★ Event Details ★ Linaro Connect Budapest 2017 (BUD17) 6-10 March 2017 Corinthia Hotel, Budapest, Erzsébet krt. 43-49, 1073 Hungary --------------------------------------------------- Keyword: keyring, universal-keyring, security http://www.linaro.org http://connect.linaro.org --------------------------------------------------- Follow us on Social Media https://www.facebook.com/LinaroOrg https://twitter.com/linaroorg https://www.youtube.com/user/linaroorg?sub_confirmation=1 https://www.linkedin.com/company/1026961"
Views: 99 LinaroOrg
Encrypted Key Exchange Solution - Applied Cryptography
 
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This video is part of an online course, Applied Cryptography. Check out the course here: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs387.
Views: 1013 Udacity
Principles of Network Security and Cryptography
 
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In this video tutorial we study the basic principles of Network security and also see the concept of Cryptography by understanding a basic example. Principles of Network Security to be discussed in this video are as follows: Confidentiality Authentication Integrity Non-repudiation Access Control Availability We will also learn the concept of Cryptography in this tutorial. Here's the definition of Cryptography: Cryptography is the art of achieving security by encoding messages to make them non-readable This video is a continuation of the previous video so make sure you check that video as well so that you get to know some basics of Network security. Download the FREE Network Security App on Google Playstore for Android - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials Simple Snippets on Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/simplesnippets/ Simple Snippets on Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/simplesnipp... Simple Snippets Google Plus Page- https://plus.google.com/+SimpleSnippets Simple Snippets email ID- [email protected] Download my FREE Network Security Android App - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intelisenze.networksecuritytutorials For Classroom Coaching in Mumbai for Programming & other IT/CS Subjects Checkout UpSkill Infotech - https://upskill.tech/ UpSkill is an Ed-Tech Company / Coaching Centre for Information Technology / Computer Science oriented courses and offer coacing for various Degree courses like BSc.IT, BSc.CS, BCA, MSc.IT, MSc.CS, MCA etc. Contact via email /call / FB /Whatsapp for more info email - [email protected] We also Provide Certification courses like - Android Development Web Development Java Developer Course .NET Developer Course Check us out on Social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Google etc Facebook page - https://www.facebook.com/upskillinfotech/ Insta page - https://www.instagram.com/upskill_infotech/ Google Maps - https://goo.gl/maps/vjNtZazLzW82
Views: 20068 Simple Snippets
PCI Requirement 4.1 – Use Strong Cryptography & Security Protocols to Safeguard Sensitive CHD
 
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Learn more at https://kirkpatrickprice.com/video/pci-requirement-4-1-use-strong-cryptography-security-protocols-safeguard-sensitive-chd-transmission/ If your organization transmits sensitive cardholder data over an open or public network, that data must be encrypted using strong cryptography and security protocols, according to PCI Requirement 4.1. Examples of open, public networks include the Internet, Bluetooth, cell phones/GSM, wireless Internet, etc. The purpose of this requirement is to prevent attackers from obtaining data while in transit, which is a common practice. Best practices for safeguarding sensitive cardholder data during transmission include: • Only use trusted keys and certificates associated with the encryption. If a certificate has expired or is not issued by a trusted source, do not accept it. • Any security protocols in use should only support secure versions or configurations; if not, the known vulnerabilities of a protocol could be exploited by an attacker. This also prevents an insecure connection. Any connection that could result in an insecure connection cannot be accepted. An example of an insecure protocol is WEP, which cannot be used for security. • The encryption strength is appropriate for the encryption methodology in use. • Documentation should define all places where cardholder data is transmitted or received over open, public networks. • Documentation should outline a process for acceptance of trusted keys and certificates, how the implemented security protocols only support secure versions or configurations, and why the encryption strength is appropriate. Stay Connected Twitter: https://twitter.com/KPAudit LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/kirkpatrickprice-llc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kirkpatrickprice/ More Free Resources PCI Demystified: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/pci-demystified/ Blog: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/blog/ Webinars: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/webinars/ Videos: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/video/ White Papers: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/white-papers/ About Us KirkpatrickPrice is a licensed CPA firm, PCI QSA, and a HITRUST CSF Assessor, registered with the PCAOB, providing assurance services to over 600 clients in more than 48 states, Canada, Asia, and Europe. The firm has over 12 years of experience in information security and compliance assurance by performing assessments, audits, and tests that strengthen information security and internal controls. KirkpatrickPrice most commonly provides advice on SOC 1, SOC 2, HIPAA, HITRUST CSF, PCI DSS, ISO 27001, FISMA, and CFPB frameworks. For more about KirkpatrickPrice: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/ Contact us today: 800-770-2701 https://kirkpatrickprice.com/contact/
Views: 142 KirkpatrickPrice
Key Confirmation in Key Exchange: A Formal Treatment and Implications for TLS 1.3
 
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Key Confirmation in Key Exchange: A Formal Treatment and Implications for TLS 1.3 Felix Günther (Technische Universität Darmstadt) Presented at the 2016 IEEE Symposium on Security & Privacy May 23–25, 2016 San Jose, CA http://www.ieee-security.org/TC/SP2016/ ABSTRACT Key exchange protocols allow two parties at remote locations to compute a shared secret key. The common security notions for such protocols are secrecy and authenticity, but many widely deployed protocols and standards name another property, called key confirmation, as a major design goal. This property should guarantee that a party in the key exchange protocol is assured that another party also holds the shared key. Remarkably, while secrecy and authenticity definitions have been studied extensively, key confirmation has been treated rather informally so far. In this work, we provide the first rigorous formalization of key confirmation, leveraging the game-based security framework well-established for secrecy and authentication notions for key exchange. We define two flavors of key confirmation, full and almost-full key confirmation, taking into account the inevitable asymmetry of the roles of the parties with respect to the transmission of the final protocol message. These notions capture the strongest level of key confirmation reasonably expectable for the two communication partners of the key exchange. We demonstrate the benefits of having precise security definitions for key-confirmation by applying them to the next version of the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol, version 1.3, currently developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Our analysis shows that the full handshake as specified in the TLS 1.3 draft draft-ietf-tls-tls13-10 achieves desirable notions of key confirmation for both clients and servers. While key confirmation is generally understood and in the TLS 1.3 draft described as being obtained from the Finished messages exchanged, interestingly we can show that the full TLS 1.3 handshake provides key confirmation even without those messages, shedding a formal light on the security properties different handshake messages entail. We further demonstrate the usefulness of rigorous definition by revisiting a folklore approach to establish key confirmation (as discussed for example in SP 800-56A of NIST). We provide a formalization as a generic protocol transformation and show that the resulting protocols enjoy strong key confirmation guarantees, thus confirming its beneficial use in both theoretical and practical protocol designs.
Linux Tutorial for Beginners - 15 - SSH Key Authentication
 
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Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/TheNewBoston-464114846956315/ GitHub - https://github.com/buckyroberts Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+BuckyRoberts LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/buckyroberts reddit - https://www.reddit.com/r/thenewboston/ Support - https://www.patreon.com/thenewboston thenewboston - https://thenewboston.com/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/bucky_roberts
Views: 131772 thenewboston
Prepare for a Breach with a Strong Crypto Foundation
 
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Breaches are inevitable, regain control with a Crypto Foundation. With data encryption in place, risk is removed from the data, and placed on the encryption keys. In this way, crypto keys become a treasure map for our sensitive data and steps must be taken to ensure keys remain safe from intruders. Lost or stolen keys could compromise an entire encryption infrastructure, so it’s important to establish a strong Crypto Foundation. A Crypto Foundation is a centralized approach taken to secure data in multiple environments, combined with the management and maintenance of keys and crypto resources. There are four core areas to consider when building your foundation: Crypto Processing & Acceleration, Key Storage, Key Lifecycle Management, and Crypto Resource Management Find out more at our Crypto Foundation resource page at http://www.safenet-inc.com/crypto-foundation.
Views: 1819 Gemalto Security
Ralph Merkle:  Privacy Between Strangers
 
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Ralph Merkle revolutionized cryptography by inventing a protocol that allows two perfect strangers to establish mutual privacy while operating under comprehensive surveillance. His followers:Diffie-Hellman, RSA, ECC are more popular, more convenient, but also more vulnerable to hidden mathematical insight. This video described Merkle's ingenious idea.
Views: 10398 Gideon Samid
Anastasiia Vixentael – Keys from the castle: ancient art of managing keys and trust
 
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Anastasiia Vixentael, Mobile Tech Lead at CossackLabs We will talk about establishing and building the trust in mobile systems. Trust is built around various trust tokens: keys, passwords, secrets, biometric properties, things you have and things you know. We will talk about what should you trust, how to establish and verify trust, how to share trustedly among different users. We will discuss building key management system, focus on technical aspects: key exchange, key trust, key derivation, key revocation, etc. We will put attention on the iOS specific approaches how to handle keys.
Views: 62 EventSpaceBy Video
PCI Requirement 3.5 Document & implement procedures to protect keys
 
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PCI Requirement 3.5 requires that your organization not only has a documented key management program, but that the key management program is implemented and in use. If an unauthorized individual were to gain access to your encryption/decryption keys, they will be able to decrypt your keys. To comply with PCI Requirement 3.5, your organization must have implemented documentation related to preventing unauthorized access to keys. The PCI DSS explains, “The requirement to protect keys from disclosure and misuse applies to both data-encrypting keys and key-encrypting keys. Because one key-encrypting key may grant access to many data-encrypting keys, the key-encrypting keys require strong protection measures.” If you store, process, or transmit cardholder data, interact with payment card data in any way, or have the ability to impact someone else’s cardholder information or the security of that information, you are subject to comply with the PCI DSS. This exclusive video series, PCI Demystified, was developed to assist your organization in understanding what the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is, who it applies to, what the specific requirements are, and what your organizations needs to know and do to become compliant. Learn more at https://kirkpatrickprice.com/video/pci-requirement-3-5-document-implement-procedures-protect-keys/ Video Transcription If your organization has implemented encryption as a means for rendering your cardholder data unreadable, we need to marry that with a program around managing your keys. So, we have to establish policies and procedures around that. Looking at Requirement 3.5, it states that you have to have a program in place that’s documented to prevent unauthorized access to these keys. Understand that if someone gains access to your encryption/decryption keys, they likely have keys to your kingdom. You see a lot of the hacks that have happened in years past, these organizations had encryption enabled (or at least they thought they had decent encryption enabled), and yet hackers were still able to remove the data from that environment. If you do not understand key management, one of the documents I would recommend that you view is the NIST 800-57 (there’s 3 documents - A, B, C) and have a read of those. That’ll help you to understand what are the merits and requirements around developing a good key management program. From an assessor’s perspective, we’re going to look at your key management program, everything that talks about your key rotation, your cryptoperiod, and the means and methods of how you protect unauthorized key substitution and everything that’s involved in that. So, we’re looking for documentation that supports that, we’re going to interview staff and make sure that those individuals that are defined as your “key custodian” understand that. We’re also going to look at the means and methods for how that’s actually implemented. Once again, whatever you’ve documented is what we expect to see in place and functioning. Stay Connected Twitter: https://twitter.com/KPAudit LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/kirkpatrickprice-llc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kirkpatrickprice/ More Free Resources PCI Demystified: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/pci-demystified/ Blog: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/blog/ Webinars: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/webinars/ Videos: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/video/ White Papers: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/white-papers/ About Us KirkpatrickPrice is a licensed CPA firm, PCI QSA, and a HITRUST CSF Assessor, registered with the PCAOB, providing assurance services to over 600 clients in more than 48 states, Canada, Asia, and Europe. The firm has over 12 years of experience in information security and compliance assurance by performing assessments, audits, and tests that strengthen information security and internal controls. KirkpatrickPrice most commonly provides advice on SOC 1, SOC 2, HIPAA, HITRUST CSF, PCI DSS, ISO 27001, FISMA, and CFPB frameworks. For more about KirkpatrickPrice: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/ Contact us today: 800-770-2701 https://kirkpatrickprice.com/contact/
Views: 93 KirkpatrickPrice
TrustedKey / FinovateFall 2017
 
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Omnyway presented at FinovateFall 2017. How they describe their product/innovation: The Trusted Key Digital Identity Platform leverages modern mobile phones, strong cryptography and blockchain technology to provide a secure, easy-to-use, and flexible identity management solution. Trusted Key allows users to bring online their govt-issued identity documents (driver’s license, passport etc.) and turn them into secure cryptographic Credentials and Tokens. Users can use these Credentials and Tokens to securely establish their identity to any online service or app, securely authenticate themselves into any service without using passwords, and digitally sign documents and authorize transactions, all from the convenience of their mobile phones. Trusted Key provides SDKs that enable financial services customers to embed these capabilities into their own apps and deploy back-end services into their own environment. Find out more at https://goo.gl/W1mvsL.
Views: 8 Finovate TV
Ponemon Research Finds Trust Online is at the Breaking Point
 
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Ponemon Institute and Venafi released the 2015 Cost of Failed Trust Report, the first update to the 2013 study and the only global research to analyze the impact of attacks on the system of Internet trust established by cryptographic keys and digital certificates. You can download your copy of the report at Venafi.com/Ponemon. What many may find surprising is that for the fourth consecutive year, every organization that participated in the survey – 100 percent of more than 2,300 IT security professionals from the U.S., United Kingdom, Australia, France, and Germany – reported that they had responded to multiple attacks on keys and certificates in the past two years. The report’s findings show that IT security professionals believe we’re at a breaking point: more than half of the respondents reported that the technology behind the trust online that their business requires to operate is in jeopardy.
Views: 155 Venafi
Intro to SSH and SSH Keys
 
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SSH (Secure Shell) serves as one of the core authentication technologies for privileged access, enabling access to Unix/Linux systems, routers, switches, firewalls, etc. In spite of it's important role in security, many security executives don't have a basic understand of SSH. This short clip provides an introduction.
Views: 55802 Paul Turner
Efficient provable Of Secure Key Distribution On Management
 
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The project titled "Efficient provable of secure key distribution management" is designed using Microsoft Visual Studio.Net 2005 as front end and Microsoft SQL Server 2000 as back end which works in .Net framework version 2.0. The coding language used is C# .Net. We authenticated three parties into this project. He will distribute the key to both sender and receiver to avoid the hacking of keys. So this architecture will provide high level security. This work presents key distribution to safeguard high level security in large networks, new directions in classical cryptography and symmetric cryptography. Two three-party key distributions, one with implicit user authentication and the other with explicit Trusted centers' authentication, are proposed to demonstrate the merits of the new combination.