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Search results “Difference between cryptochrome and phytochrome images”
What does phytochrome mean?
 
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What does phytochrome mean? A spoken definition of phytochrome. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/phytochrome Text to Speech powered by TTS-API.COM
What does cryptochrome mean?
 
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What does cryptochrome mean? A spoken definition of cryptochrome. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cryptochrome Text to Speech powered by TTS-API.COM
Cryptochrome intro
 
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Peter Morovic's introduction to the cryptochrome paper at the 18th Color Imaging Conference.
Views: 586 Jan Morovic
Photoprotection
 
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Created using http://studio.stupeflix.com/
Views: 212 Giuliana Guidarelli
Biology Part II-Reproduction-Photo periodic Categories of Plants By PGC
 
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Biology Part II-Reproduction-Photo periodic Categories of Plants By PGC Share With Class Mates & DON'T Forget To Click Subscribe Button for Get More video Lectures. Thank You !!! For new Updates like our page on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pgclectures Visit our site: http://pgclectures.com https://twitter.com/PGC_Lectures https://plus.google.com/+PGClecture Visit our site: http://pgclectures.com
Views: 1303 PGC Lectures
Clinorotation of Arabidopsis thaliana.
 
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Clinostat Rotation - Blue Light
Views: 119 Joshua Vandenbrink
What does photomorphogenic mean?
 
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What does photomorphogenic mean? A spoken definition of photomorphogenic. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/photomorphogenic Text to Speech powered by TTS-API.COM
CIRCADIAN rhythm - WikiVidi Documentary
 
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A circadian rhythm is any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours. These 24-hour rhythms are driven by a circadian clock, and they have been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi, and cyanobacteria. The term circadian comes from the Latin circa, meaning "around" , and diēm, meaning "day". The formal study of biological temporal rhythms, such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology. Processes with 24-hour oscillations are more generally called diurnal rhythms; strictly speaking, they should not be called circadian rhythms unless their endogenous nature is confirmed. Although circadian rhythms are endogenous , they are adjusted to the local environment by external cues called zeitgebers , which include light, temperature and redox cycles. In medical science, an abnormal circadian rhythm in humans is known as circadian rhythm disorder. In 2017, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was... http://www.wikividi.com ____________________________________ Shortcuts to chapters: 00:01:33: History 00:04:09: Origin 00:08:39: Importance in animals 00:09:18: Effect of circadian disruption 00:10:06: Effect of light–dark cycle 00:11:42: Arctic animals 00:12:56: Butterfly migration 00:13:16: In plants 00:17:36: Biological clock in mammals 00:19:47: Humans 00:20:46: Biological markers and effects 00:23:46: Outside the "master clock" 00:24:48: Light and the biological clock 00:25:15: Enforced longer cycles 00:26:09: Human health 00:27:11: Indoor lighting 00:27:43: Obesity and diabetes 00:28:43: Airline pilots (and cabin crew) 00:29:24: Disruption 00:30:36: Effect of drugs ____________________________________ Copyright WikiVidi. Licensed under Creative Commons. Wikipedia link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circadian_rhythm
Plant physiology
 
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Plant physiology is a subdiscipline of botany concerned with the functioning, or physiology, of plants. Closely related fields include plant morphology (structure of plants), plant ecology (interactions with the environment), phytochemistry (biochemistry of plants), cell biology, genetics, biophysics and molecular biology. Fundamental processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, plant nutrition, plant hormone functions, tropisms, nastic movements, photoperiodism, photomorphogenesis, circadian rhythms, environmental stress physiology, seed germination, dormancy and stomata function and transpiration, both parts of plant water relations, are studied by plant physiologists. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2211 Audiopedia
Circadian rhythm
 
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A circadian rhythm /sɜrˈkeɪdiən/ is any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours. These rhythms are driven by a circadian clock, and rhythms have been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi, and cyanobacteria. The term circadian comes from the Latin circa, meaning "around" (or "approximately"), and diem or dies, meaning "day". The formal study of biological temporal rhythms, such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology. Although circadian rhythms are endogenous ("built-in", self-sustained), they are adjusted (entrained) to the local environment by external cues called zeitgebers, commonly the most important of which is daylight. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2365 Audiopedia
Phototropism
 
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Phototropism is the growth of organisms in response to a light stimulus. It is most often observed in plants, but can also occur in other organisms such as fungi. The cells on the plant that are farthest from the light have a chemical called auxin that reacts when phototropism occurs. This causes the plant to have elongated cells on the farthest side from the light. Phototropism is one of the many plant tropisms or movements which respond to external stimuli. Growth towards a light source is called positive phototropism, while growth away from light is called negative phototropism. Most plant shoots exhibit positive phototropism, and rearrange their chloroplasts in the leaves to maximize photosynthetic energy and promote growth. Roots usually exhibit negative phototropism, although gravitropism may play a larger role in root behavior and growth. Some vine shoot tips exhibit negative phototropism, which allows them to grow towards dark, solid objects and climb them. The combination of phototropism and gravitropism allow plants to grow in the correct direction. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 495 Audiopedia
What does photoinhibition mean?
 
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What does photoinhibition mean? A spoken definition of photoinhibition. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/photoinhibition Text to Speech powered by TTS-API.COM
Circadian rhythm
 
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A circadian rhythm /sɜrˈkeɪdiən/ is any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours. These rhythms are driven by a circadian clock, and rhythms have been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi, and cyanobacteria. The term circadian comes from the Latin circa, meaning "around" , and diem or dies, meaning "day". The formal study of biological temporal rhythms, such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology. Although circadian rhythms are endogenous , they are adjusted to the local environment by external cues called zeitgebers, commonly the most important of which is daylight. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 485 encyclopediacc
How Sugar Is Transported In Plants?
 
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Plant transport plants transportation of photosynthates in the phloem 699 11924 cached similar sugars produced sources, such as leaves, must be delivered to growing parts plant. And the simplest form of sugar, glucose are aldose and fructose ketose. The mass flow of 11 may 2010. 38 water and sugar transport in plants. Part of the pressure flow theory is that sucrose produced moved by active transport into companion cells phloem in leaf veins 13 nov 2016 distinguish sources and sinks for plant sugars; Explain mechanism responsible model sugar plants have two systems to move food, water minerals through their dissolved sugars, during photosynthesis, other soluble food 8 dec 2011 tranport best eksplains themovement sugars from leaves roots sap moves via translocation, materials a are organs such as produce 20 mar 2013 vascular energy form where they sites growth. In sugar sinks, cells actively transport solutes out of the sieve tube elements, producing phloem vascular system provides a path for assimilate from source to sink. It is intended for both gcse and a level post 16 biology the pressure flow hypothesis, also known as mass best supported theory to explain movement of sap through phloem. These sugars are transported through the plant via why should plants transform glucose into sucrose before discovery on how moved throughout a sciencedaily. Plant energy transport. Plant energy transport sparknotes plants essential processes sugar transport biology section2. Start studying chapter 37 water and sugar transport in plants. The pressure flow theory best explains. Googleusercontent search. Animation transport of water and sugar in plantschapter 5 phloem plants actionchapter 37 flashcards 38. Optimal concentration for sugar transport in plants. So it can't be transported via phloem and the next choice is sucrose, being 8 dec 2011 just as it's necessary for human body to move nutrients all of organs, vital green plants transport sugars supply its various this animation allows students view key processes plant in xylem. Sugar transport in plants phloem gcse bitesize science systems and processes. These sugars are transported through the plant via 8 dec 2014 glucose and fructose simple monosaccharides found in plants. At the sources (usually leaves), sugar molecules are moved into sieve elements (phloem cells) through active transport in plants. Sugar transport in plant slideshare. Journal of the sugar transport pressure flow hypothesis youtube. The sugars produced in the sources, such as leaves, must be delivered to growing parts of plant. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, other study tools Sparknotes plants essential processes sugar transportplant energy transport. How plants send sugars from sources to sinks dummies. The mechanism by which sugars are transported through the phloem, from sources to sinks, is called pressure flow. Rhtml url? Q webcache. The movement of sugars from the leavesthe leaf cells are called 'source'
Views: 131 Sea of Question
Low temperature-induced chloroplast relocation mediated by a blue light receptor, phototropin 2, in
 
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From the Springer article: Low temperature-induced chloroplast relocation mediated by a blue light receptor, phototropin 2, in fern gametophytes http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?id=doi:10.1007%2fs10265-008-0165-9 by: Kodama, Yutaka; Tsuboi, Hidenori; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Movie S3. Time-lapse observation of chloroplast movement during cold positioning under blue light. Images were acquired at 15 min intervals for 24 h. Bar indicates 50 μm (AVI 10401 kb) Journal: Journal of Plant Research Vol. 121 Issue 4 DOI: 10.1007/s10265-008-0165-9 Published: 2008-07-04
Views: 674 SpringerVideos
[Journal Club] Light-inducible protein-interaction modules based on Arabidopsis thaliana
 
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Light inducible control of protein-protein interactions provides powerful optical tools for manipulating biological processes. General light-mediated modules have been discovered and engineered based on Arabidopsis thaliana, expecting to be useful for controlling a broad range of cell phenomena with high temporal and high spatial resolution. In this report, I introduced two representative light-mediated protein-protein interactions systems which are suitable for mammalian cells.
Views: 395 [email protected]
PHOTOTROPISM for beginners
 
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Produced with CyberLink PowerDirector. that was the program i used, and this is my dialog which I MADE!!: Well... Photo means light, and Tropism is growth in plants from an environmental stimulus. So Phototropism is A plants reaction to light, growing in a certain way and direction. Growing towards light is known as positive phototropism, and growing away from light is known as negative phototropism. Most plants usually show positive phototropism where as roots usually show the negative kind. Sometimes bind shoots use negative phototropism to climb up dark objects, such as walls, to find more light. Phototropism uses auxin's, which are plant hormones, which have lots of uses. Here they are able to react to light, and break bonds in the cell walls. Making them less rigid. And making them swell up, and creating pressure, causing growth to grow in a different direction. Phototropism is directed by light receptors, such as, cryptochromes that detect blue light, and phytochromes that detect red light. This normally takes place in the tip of the plant. A scientist once conducted a experiment on this. To do this he took three plants and cut the tips of and placed one in a normal box, and one in the same type of box but put a foil cone on its head , and finally with the last one put it again in the same kind of box but put a hole in the side. This one grew towards the hole, the one with the tin foiled hat on grew straight up and the plain one didn't grow at all. Phototropism is important for the plant as it can find more light and grow taller and taller.
Views: 16376 96weasell
Low temperature-induced chloroplast relocation mediated by a blue light receptor, phototropin 2, in
 
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From the Springer article: Low temperature-induced chloroplast relocation mediated by a blue light receptor, phototropin 2, in fern gametophytes http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?id=doi:10.1007%2fs10265-008-0165-9 by: Kodama, Yutaka; Tsuboi, Hidenori; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Movie S2. Time-lapse observation of chloroplast movement during dark positioning. Images were acquired at 15 min intervals for 24 h. Bar indicates 50 μm (AVI 14073 kb) Journal: Journal of Plant Research Vol. 121 Issue 4 DOI: 10.1007/s10265-008-0165-9 Published: 2008-07-04
Views: 461 SpringerVideos
Joseph Takahashi (UT Southwestern/HHMI) Part 1B: Circadian Clocks: Clock Genes, Cells and Circuits 2
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/circadian-clocks/#part-2 Lecture Overview: Circadian rhythms are an adaptation to the 24 hr day that we experience. Takahashi begins his talk with an historic overview of how the genes controlling circadian clocks were first identified in Drosophila and the cloning tour de force that was required to identify clock genes in mice. He also describes the experiments that resulted in the realization that all cells in the body have a circadian clock, not just cells in the brain. In part 1B, Takahashi explains that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain generates a circadian rhythm of fluctuating body temperature that, in turn, signals to peripheral tissues. Heat shock factor 1 is one of the signaling molecules responsible for communicating the temperature information and resetting peripheral clocks. In Part 2, Takahashi describes how crossing many mice of different genetic backgrounds allowed his lab to identify several genes that impact the output of the clock gene system through different mechanisms. Takahashi begins the last part of his presentation with the crystal structures of BMAL and Clock, the two central activators of clock gene transcription. He goes on to describe how his lab showed that BMAL/Clock controls the DNA binding activity of transcriptional regulators of not only cycling genes, but also of basic cell functions such as RNA polymerase 2 occupancy and histone modification. Speaker Bio: Joseph Takahashi received his BA in biology from Swarthmore College, his PhD in neuroscience from the University of Oregon, and he was a post-doctoral fellow with Martin Zatz at the National Institutes of Mental Health. He then spent 26 years at Northwestern University where he was a faculty member in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology and in 1997 he became an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2008, Takahashi joined the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center as the Loyd B. Sands Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience. Using forward genetic screens in mice, Takahashi identified the first mammalian circadian gene "Clock" in 1997. Since then, his lab has gone on to identify and clone numerous circadian genes in both the brain and tissues throughout the body. Takahashi has received numerous awards and honors for his ground-breaking research including election to the National Academy of Sciences.
Views: 5633 iBiology
Elizabeth M. Middleton Maniac Lecture, March 28, 2018
 
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Dr. Elizabeth M. Middleton, a senior terrestrial ecosystem and carbon cycle scientist at GSFC, presented a Maniac lecture entitled, "Four Satellites and a Cornfield." In this lecture, Betsy talks about her unconventional path as a woman scientist while balancing family and care-giver responsibilities. She recently claimed her 40 year NASA Certificate and Pin. During those four decades she has been fortunate to be directly involved in four satellite missions. These were Landsat (ERRSAC), EO-1 (Mission Scientist), an ESA mission (FLEX) now in formulation phase A, and a successful NASA mission concept development team (HyspIRI). In addition, she has been involved in basic research on plant physiology and reflectance characteristics. Various in situ studies include hyperspectral and BRDF properties of plant canopies, UV-B effects on soybean, and nitrogen and drought effects on photosynthesis and fluorescence in cornfields. She was also a PI and Co-PI in the FIFE and BOREAS multi-year field campaigns.
Views: 122 GSFC MANIAC