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Blasterbotica 2017 NASA Robotic Mining Competition Rule 32 Document Video
 
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NASA 2017 RMC rule 32 documentation video created by team Blasterbotica from the Colorado School of Mines.
Views: 583 Marcus Turner
Northstar Robotics 2018 NASA RMC Competition Run #1
 
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First NASA Robotic Mining Competition run for Northstar Robotics, an RMC team from the University of Minnesota. northstarrobotics.org facebook.com/NorthstarRobotics twitter.com/NorthstarRMC instagram.com/umn_rmc
Views: 686 Northstar Robotics
Blasterbotica 2016 NASA Robotic Mining Competition Rule 32 Document Video
 
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NASA 2016 RMC rule 32 documentation video created by team Blasterbotica from the Colorado School of Mines
Views: 326 Nhan Tran
Robotic Mining Competition Put Student Engineers to the Test
 
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Teams of undergraduate and graduate students from throughout the nation recently gathered at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex to demonstrate their excavator robots during the 2016 Robotic Mining Competition. Similar technology may prove valuable in NASA's Journey to Mars.
Views: 2699 NASAKennedy
IMG 6292 NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition (#RMC2015/@NASARMC) - Inside the Glass
 
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This video was shot inside the competition arena (inside the glass) by myself to share the dusty experience and a unique view of the competitors in action at NASA's 2015 Robotic Mining Challenge. RMC - About the Competition NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s mission of pioneering a human presence on Mars through resource mining and utilization. A critical resource on Mars is water ice which can be found buried in the regolith where it is well insulated. The technology concepts developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative robotic excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload. The unique physical properties of basaltic regolith and the reduced 3/8th of Earth gravity make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in Martian mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation’s space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the basaltic regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, the weight and size limitations of the mining robot, and the ability to tele-operate it from a remote mission control center. The scoring for the mining category will require teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and dust projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required, and autonomy. To learn more about the competition, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html
Views: 3178 Ryan Kobrick
NASA's Regolith Mining Competition
 
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Highlights from the NASA's Fifth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition. The competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. Video is courtesy NASA Edge.
Views: 4737 SpaceRef
NASA's Robotic Mining Competition Wraps Up at Kennedy Space Center
 
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More than 40 college and university teams from around the U.S. used their custom-made, remote-controlled mining robots to dig in a giant arena filled with simulated Martian dirt and ice rocks at NASA's Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida..
Views: 1234 NASAKennedy
ISERI-NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition
 
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ISERI participated 2012 NASA Lunabotics Mining Competition.
Views: 3083 ISERI HY
NASA Robotics Mining Competition 2018 - University of Portland - Run 1
 
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NASA Robotics Mining Competition 2018 - University of Portland - Run 1
Views: 105 mary kane
Texas A&M International University  - DustyTRON Robotic Team - NASA RMC 2016 - Rule 32
 
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Texas A&M International University - DustyTRON Robotic Team - NASA RMC 2016 - Rule 32
UIUC NASA Robotic Mining Competition: Rule 32 Documentation
 
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University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign students demonstrate their robot for the 2014 NASA Robotic Mining Competition.
Views: 531 IRIS UIUC
2018 NASA RMC Reveal
 
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Presenting our robot for the 2018 NASA Robotic Mining Competition: Grimlock!
Views: 197 TrickFire Robotics
NASA RMC 2016: Temple University and University of Vermont 2nd run
 
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NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2016 2nd run of Temple University and University of Vermont
Views: 1178 Nils Stormer
KSU Robotics Team Rule 32 Proof of Life Video NASA RMC 2017
 
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Kent State Robotics Team NASA RMC Rule 32 Proof of Life video for the 2017 competition.
Views: 346 Kent State Robotics
NASA Robotics Mining Competition 2014
 
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ASU is competing in the 2014 NASA Robotic Mining Competition at Kennedy Space Center May 19th-23rd.
Views: 751 Ben Stinnett
CWRUbotix NASA RMC  2016 2017 Rule 32 Video
 
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Case Western Reserve University's rule 32 video for the 2017 NASA Robotic Mining competition.
Views: 599 CWRUbotix
University of Utah Robotic Mining Team - NASA Robotic Mining Competition Round 1
 
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An amazing run! Getting a total of 49.3 kg of regolith, and .9kb of Icy Regolith! That got us the best run of the day!
Views: 724 John Robe
NASA RMC 2017: Virginia Tech 1st Run
 
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Virginia Techs 1st Run at the 2017 NASA Robotic Mining Competition
Views: 379 Nils Stormer
UNC Charlotte 49er miners - NASA RMC 2016
 
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A preview of the 49er Miner (University of North Carolina at Charlotte) Teams mining robot for the 2016 NASA RMC and rule 32.
Views: 598 Stevengineer
Osprey Miners - NASA RMC 2016 - Rule 32
 
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Rule 32 Documentation for NASA Robotic Mining Competition.
Views: 273 Osprey Miners
IMG 6208 NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition (#RMC2015/@NASARMC) - Inside the Glass
 
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This video was shot inside the competition arena (inside the glass) by myself to share the dusty experience and a unique view of the competitors in action at NASA's 2015 Robotic Mining Challenge. RMC - About the Competition NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s mission of pioneering a human presence on Mars through resource mining and utilization. A critical resource on Mars is water ice which can be found buried in the regolith where it is well insulated. The technology concepts developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative robotic excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload. The unique physical properties of basaltic regolith and the reduced 3/8th of Earth gravity make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in Martian mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation’s space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the basaltic regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, the weight and size limitations of the mining robot, and the ability to tele-operate it from a remote mission control center. The scoring for the mining category will require teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and dust projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required, and autonomy. To learn more about the competition, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html
Views: 446 Ryan Kobrick
2014 NASA robotic mining competition
 
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TAMUC robot for the 2014 NASA Robotic Mining Competition
Missouri S&T Robotics: NASA RMC 2016 Rule 32 Submission
 
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A video that shows the operation of Missouri S&T's robot for NASA's Robotic Mining Competition.
Views: 63 Jerry Linder
IMG 6272 NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition (#RMC2015/@NASARMC) - Inside the Glass
 
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This video was shot inside the competition arena (inside the glass) by myself to share the dusty experience and a unique view of the competitors in action at NASA's 2015 Robotic Mining Challenge. RMC - About the Competition NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s mission of pioneering a human presence on Mars through resource mining and utilization. A critical resource on Mars is water ice which can be found buried in the regolith where it is well insulated. The technology concepts developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative robotic excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload. The unique physical properties of basaltic regolith and the reduced 3/8th of Earth gravity make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in Martian mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation’s space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the basaltic regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, the weight and size limitations of the mining robot, and the ability to tele-operate it from a remote mission control center. The scoring for the mining category will require teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and dust projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required, and autonomy. To learn more about the competition, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html
Views: 260 Ryan Kobrick
Colorado School of Mines 2015 NASA RMC
 
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This is the rover that the Colorado School of Mines will be competing with during the 2015 NASA Robotic Mining Competition at the Kennedy Space Center.
Views: 1850 Lucas Brockman
The University of Akron NASA Robotic Mining Team
 
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2017 overview of the University of Akron NASA Robotic Mining Team. We are located at the University of Akron in Akron, Ohio. We have been participating in the NASA Robotic Mining Competition for 8 years since the competition's inception. To contact us email [email protected]
IMG 6222 NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition (#RMC2015/@NASARMC) - Inside the Glass
 
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This video was shot inside the competition arena (inside the glass) by myself to share the dusty experience and a unique view of the competitors in action at NASA's 2015 Robotic Mining Challenge. RMC - About the Competition NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s mission of pioneering a human presence on Mars through resource mining and utilization. A critical resource on Mars is water ice which can be found buried in the regolith where it is well insulated. The technology concepts developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative robotic excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload. The unique physical properties of basaltic regolith and the reduced 3/8th of Earth gravity make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in Martian mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation’s space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the basaltic regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, the weight and size limitations of the mining robot, and the ability to tele-operate it from a remote mission control center. The scoring for the mining category will require teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and dust projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required, and autonomy. To learn more about the competition, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html
Views: 270 Ryan Kobrick
IMG 6202 NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition (#RMC2015/@NASARMC) - Inside the Glass
 
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This video was shot inside the competition arena (inside the glass) by myself to share the dusty experience and a unique view of the competitors in action at NASA's 2015 Robotic Mining Challenge. RMC - About the Competition NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s mission of pioneering a human presence on Mars through resource mining and utilization. A critical resource on Mars is water ice which can be found buried in the regolith where it is well insulated. The technology concepts developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative robotic excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload. The unique physical properties of basaltic regolith and the reduced 3/8th of Earth gravity make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in Martian mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation’s space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the basaltic regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, the weight and size limitations of the mining robot, and the ability to tele-operate it from a remote mission control center. The scoring for the mining category will require teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and dust projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required, and autonomy. To learn more about the competition, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html
Views: 471 Ryan Kobrick
IMG 6252 NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition (#RMC2015/@NASARMC) - Inside the Glass
 
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This video was shot inside the competition arena (inside the glass) by myself to share the dusty experience and a unique view of the competitors in action at NASA's 2015 Robotic Mining Challenge. RMC - About the Competition NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s mission of pioneering a human presence on Mars through resource mining and utilization. A critical resource on Mars is water ice which can be found buried in the regolith where it is well insulated. The technology concepts developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative robotic excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload. The unique physical properties of basaltic regolith and the reduced 3/8th of Earth gravity make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in Martian mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation’s space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the basaltic regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, the weight and size limitations of the mining robot, and the ability to tele-operate it from a remote mission control center. The scoring for the mining category will require teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and dust projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required, and autonomy. To learn more about the competition, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html
Views: 320 Ryan Kobrick
John Brown University - Nasa Robotics Mining Competition 2016-2017
 
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This is the demo video for the 2016-2017 competition. The robot was designed and built by Leanna Ngo, Chase Harrod, Hank Black and Tomas Sanchez.
Views: 352 Jose Tomas Sanchez
NASA RMC 2015 - Inside the Glass: Alabama 1
 
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University of Alabama
Views: 1723 Purdue Lunabotics
IMG 6192 NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition (#RMC2015/@NASARMC) - Inside the Glass
 
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This video was shot inside the competition arena (inside the glass) by myself to share the dusty experience and a unique view of the competitors in action at NASA's 2015 Robotic Mining Challenge. RMC - About the Competition NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s mission of pioneering a human presence on Mars through resource mining and utilization. A critical resource on Mars is water ice which can be found buried in the regolith where it is well insulated. The technology concepts developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative robotic excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload. The unique physical properties of basaltic regolith and the reduced 3/8th of Earth gravity make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in Martian mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation’s space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the basaltic regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, the weight and size limitations of the mining robot, and the ability to tele-operate it from a remote mission control center. The scoring for the mining category will require teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and dust projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required, and autonomy. To learn more about the competition, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html
Views: 218 Ryan Kobrick
IMG 6301 NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition (#RMC2015/@NASARMC) - Inside the Glass
 
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This video was shot inside the competition arena (inside the glass) by myself to share the dusty experience and a unique view of the competitors in action at NASA's 2015 Robotic Mining Challenge. RMC - About the Competition NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s mission of pioneering a human presence on Mars through resource mining and utilization. A critical resource on Mars is water ice which can be found buried in the regolith where it is well insulated. The technology concepts developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative robotic excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload. The unique physical properties of basaltic regolith and the reduced 3/8th of Earth gravity make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in Martian mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation’s space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the basaltic regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, the weight and size limitations of the mining robot, and the ability to tele-operate it from a remote mission control center. The scoring for the mining category will require teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and dust projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required, and autonomy. To learn more about the competition, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html
Views: 416 Ryan Kobrick
#RMC2018POLVanderbiltRobotics
 
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Vanderbilt Robotics Proof of Life for the NASA Robotic Mining Competition I do not own the music!!! Music: Launch from To The Moon Artist: Kan. R. Gao
Views: 352 Lin Liu
Alabama Astrobotics NASA RMC 2018 run 2
 
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The UA bot dug 1.6kg of gravel on this run (1kg qualifies), fully autonomous. Official run starts around 5:00
Views: 602 Justin Headley
UNCC NASA RMC Astro SD2
 
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UNCC NASA RMC Astro SD2
Views: 314 Elijah Pfeifer
NASA's Mining Competition Rover (A.L.E.S)
 
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York university Robotic society design and built this rover for NASA's mining competition in 2014. Everything was built in York university by students of York.
Views: 20 Tahmoor Naeem
Utah - NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2017 - 2nd Round
 
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Utah - NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2017 - 2nd Round
Views: 163 Ben Wilson
IMG 6233 NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition (#RMC2015/@NASARMC) - Inside the Glass
 
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This video was shot inside the competition arena (inside the glass) by myself to share the dusty experience and a unique view of the competitors in action at NASA's 2015 Robotic Mining Challenge. RMC - About the Competition NASA’s Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a Collector Bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s mission of pioneering a human presence on Mars through resource mining and utilization. A critical resource on Mars is water ice which can be found buried in the regolith where it is well insulated. The technology concepts developed by the university teams for this competition conceivably could be used to robotically mine regolith resources on Mars. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative robotic excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload. The unique physical properties of basaltic regolith and the reduced 3/8th of Earth gravity make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in Martian mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation’s space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the basaltic regolith simulant, called Black Point-1 or BP-1, the weight and size limitations of the mining robot, and the ability to tele-operate it from a remote mission control center. The scoring for the mining category will require teams to consider a number of design and operation factors such as dust tolerance and dust projection, communications, vehicle mass, energy/power required, and autonomy. To learn more about the competition, please visit: http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html
Views: 415 Ryan Kobrick