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2 Challenges in Cryptography Research (ft. Serge Vaudenay)
 
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This video presents the Diffie-Hellman protocol, which is used to set up secure communication channels all over the Internet. It features Serge Vaudenay, full professor of the IC School at EPFL. https://people.epfl.ch/serge.vaudenay ————————————————————————————— The Diffie-Hellman Protocol (ft. Serge Vaudenay) | ZettaBytes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOlCU4not0s
Views: 1385 ZettaBytes, EPFL
Cryptography: Crash Course Computer Science #33
 
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Today we’re going to talk about how to keep information secret, and this isn’t a new goal. From as early as Julius Caesar’s Caesar cipher to Mary, Queen of Scots, encrypted messages to kill Queen Elizabeth in 1587, theres has long been a need to encrypt and decrypt private correspondence. This proved especially critical during World War II as Allan Turing and his team at Bletchley Park attempted to decrypt messages from Nazi Enigma machines, and this need has only grown as more and more information sensitive tasks are completed on our computers. So today, we’re going to walk you through some common encryption techniques such as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange, and RSA which are employed to keep your information safe, private, and secure. Note: In October of 2017, researchers released a viable hack against WPA2, known as KRACK Attack, which uses AES to ensure secure communication between computers and network routers. The problem isn't with AES, which is provably secure, but with the communication protocol between router and computer. In order to set up secure communication, the computer and router have to agree through what's called a "handshake". If this handshake is interrupted in just the right way, an attacker can cause the handshake to fault to an insecure state and reveal critical information which makes the connection insecure. As is often the case with these situations, the problem is with an implementation, not the secure algorithm itself. Our friends over at Computerphile have a great video on the topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYtvjijATa4 Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 167765 CrashCourse
Public key cryptography - Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (full version)
 
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The history behind public key cryptography & the Diffie-Hellman key exchange algorithm. We also have a video on RSA here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXB-V_Keiu8
Views: 591546 Art of the Problem
Symmetric Key and Public Key Encryption
 
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Modern day encryption is performed in two different ways. Check out http://YouTube.com/ITFreeTraining or http://itfreetraining.com for more of our always free training videos. Using the same key or using a pair of keys called the public and private keys. This video looks at how these systems work and how they can be used together to perform encryption. Download the PDF handout http://itfreetraining.com/Handouts/Ce... Encryption Types Encryption is the process of scrambling data so it cannot be read without a decryption key. Encryption prevents data being read by a 3rd party if it is intercepted by a 3rd party. The two encryption methods that are used today are symmetric and public key encryption. Symmetric Key Symmetric key encryption uses the same key to encrypt data as decrypt data. This is generally quite fast when compared with public key encryption. In order to protect the data, the key needs to be secured. If a 3rd party was able to gain access to the key, they could decrypt any data that was encrypt with that data. For this reason, a secure channel is required to transfer the key if you need to transfer data between two points. For example, if you encrypted data on a CD and mail it to another party, the key must also be transferred to the second party so that they can decrypt the data. This is often done using e-mail or the telephone. In a lot of cases, sending the data using one method and the key using another method is enough to protect the data as an attacker would need to get both in order to decrypt the data. Public Key Encryption This method of encryption uses two keys. One key is used to encrypt data and the other key is used to decrypt data. The advantage of this is that the public key can be downloaded by anyone. Anyone with the public key can encrypt data that can only be decrypted using a private key. This means the public key does not need to be secured. The private key does need to be keep in a safe place. The advantage of using such a system is the private key is not required by the other party to perform encryption. Since the private key does not need to be transferred to the second party there is no risk of the private key being intercepted by a 3rd party. Public Key encryption is slower when compared with symmetric key so it is not always suitable for every application. The math used is complex but to put it simply it uses the modulus or remainder operator. For example, if you wanted to solve X mod 5 = 2, the possible solutions would be 2, 7, 12 and so on. The private key provides additional information which allows the problem to be solved easily. The math is more complex and uses much larger numbers than this but basically public and private key encryption rely on the modulus operator to work. Combing The Two There are two reasons you want to combine the two. The first is that often communication will be broken into two steps. Key exchange and data exchange. For key exchange, to protect the key used in data exchange it is often encrypted using public key encryption. Although slower than symmetric key encryption, this method ensures the key cannot accessed by a 3rd party while being transferred. Since the key has been transferred using a secure channel, a symmetric key can be used for data exchange. In some cases, data exchange may be done using public key encryption. If this is the case, often the data exchange will be done using a small key size to reduce the processing time. The second reason that both may be used is when a symmetric key is used and the key needs to be provided to multiple users. For example, if you are using encryption file system (EFS) this allows multiple users to access the same file, which includes recovery users. In order to make this possible, multiple copies of the same key are stored in the file and protected from being read by encrypting it with the public key of each user that requires access. References "Public-key cryptography" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-k... "Encryption" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encryption
Views: 427736 itfreetraining
What are security issues in Cryptography
 
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www.hiteshChoudhary.com www.newdemy.com What are security issues in Cryptography? Why there is a need of Cryptography is a very important question. In the earlier times when one need to transfer any sensitive information, one can write it on paper and can seal it along with manual monitoring system i.e. one person guarding or protecting the information. But after the invention of radio, things got changed. One can tune into your radio without your knowledge and can collect all information. Just collecting the information is not a bug issue but one can modify the information as well. Information security attack is a broad term, so let’s make a few scenario examples to clarify it out on a broad level. Case 1 User A wants to transmit a file to user B. The file may contain some sensitive information like Bank passwords. User C, who is not authorized to read the file, is somehow monitor the transfer and captures a copy of the file during transmission. Case 2 User A wants to transmit a file to user B. User A gives some bank details to open and close new accounts. User C, intercepts the file and add User C’s information to be added and gets a new unauthorized bank account. User C can also delete some valid account information by altering the information. User B updates the details according to information passed by User A, having no idea that information was tempered on its way. Case 3 User A is just relaxing in this case. User C, who is an unauthorized person, just creates his own message and act as a User A and passes the information to User B. User B accepts the message and act according the message. It is totally up to User C that what he wants to do. User C can format all the information or add some backdoor information in the system and so on. Case 4 User C works for the company and due to some reasons C was fires from the company. User A asks the User B, who is an administrator in the company to lock all the access of User C’s account. But User C, creates some useless traffic and delays the message to reach to user B. User c makes a final access to the account and downloads the entire information to local or permanent access. After completing the work he allows the message to get passed. Case 5 A message is sent from user A to user B to purchase xyz share or xyz amount. Things didn’t went in right direction for User A and investment lose value. Now user A denies that he ever passed any message to user B to purchase any share. These are some of the broadly covered situations explaining the need of cryptography. Cryptography gives us a solution to all of these problems. We just have to utilize the concept and put it in some form of codes or protocols to implement it.
Views: 1968 Hitesh Choudhary
Asymmetric encryption - Simply explained
 
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How does public-key cryptography work? What is a private key and a public key? Why is asymmetric encryption different from symmetric encryption? I'll explain all of these in plain English! 🐦 Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/savjee ✏️ Check out my blog: https://www.savjee.be 👍🏻 Like my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/savjee
Cicada 3301 (All Clues and How They Were Solved)
 
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Want to know more about PGP encryption? Here's the video I used https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yN4uMMsK8I Songs: 00:40 song {Halsey - Haunting (Official Instrumental) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eT6VVntT8lo Piano cover by cragezy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AxBYR11MG8 As not stated, the video is not entirely accurate (i.e notes shown were drawn up for clearity). Please refrain from pointing out the flaws when the majority of the video is correct. Douche Clues Clue 1: 0:00 Clue 2: 1:22 Clue 3: 1:48 Clue 4: 2:00 Clue 5: 5:50 Clue 6: 6:45 Clue 7: 8:22 Clue 8: 10:11 Clue 9: 11:05 Clue 10: 13:08
Views: 3413573 TheBraveZombies
Public Key Cryptography - Computerphile
 
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Spies used to meet in the park to exchange code words, now things have moved on - Robert Miles explains the principle of Public/Private Key Cryptography note1: Yes, it should have been 'Obi Wan' not 'Obi One' :) note2: The string of 'garbage' text in the two examples should have been different to illustrate more clearly that there are two different systems in use. http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. See the full list of Brady's video projects at: http://bit.ly/bradychannels
Views: 399180 Computerphile
Lecture 1: Introduction to Cryptography by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com. The book chapter "Introduction" for this video is also available for free at the website (click "Sample Chapter").
Do you REALLY understand Bitcoin 51% Attack? Programmer explains.
 
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Bitcoin 51% attack is a theoretical attack that can be caused by someone who possesses 51% or more of the hashing power in the network. Today we talk about exactly what this attack is and how it can be executed. Thanks for watching guys 💝 🎤 If you would like me to speak at your conference, book me here: https://ivanontech.com 🍻 Join the crypto discussion forum - https://thecrypto.pub 📚 Get my free e-book on Bitcoin and Blockchain - http://eepurl.com/c0hyc9 you will receive the book in your inbox once you sign up 👫👭👬Social: LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/ivanliljeqvist/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/ivanontech/ Steemit: https://steemit.com/@ivanli Facebook: http://facebook.com/ivanontech/ Exclusive email list: http://eepurl.com/c0hyc9 🤑 Buy cryptocurrencies: https://www.coinbase.com/join/529bab0ab08ded7080000019 💰 Secure your Crypto with Hardware Wallets: Ledger: https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/4607 Trezor: https://trezor.io/?a=rvj3rqtje3ph Ivan on Tech by Ivan Liljeqvist
Views: 72051 Ivan on Tech
The Mathematics of of Encryption
 
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If you are not yet an Open University student and would like to know more about learning to program using Sense or would like more information about studying Information and Communication Technologies then use this link to go to the Open University website: www.computing.open.ac.uk/
Views: 557 Paul Carter
Collision Resistance and Birthday Paradox (CSS322, L20, Y14)
 
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Birthday paradox as example of collisions. Properties of cryptographic hash functions. Course material via: http://sandilands.info/sgordon/teaching
Views: 1597 Steven Gordon
Public Key Cryptography: Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (short version)
 
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This is a segment of this full video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEBfamv-_do Diffie-Hellman key exchange was one of the earliest practical implementations of key exchange within the field of cryptography. It relies on the discrete logarithm problem. This test clip will be part of the final chapter of Gambling with Secrets!
Views: 437214 Art of the Problem
21. Cryptography: Hash Functions
 
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MIT 6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Spring 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-046JS15 Instructor: Srinivas Devadas In this lecture, Professor Devadas covers the basics of cryptography, including desirable properties of cryptographic functions, and their applications to security. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 63545 MIT OpenCourseWare
Playfair Cipher Explained
 
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An animated attempt of explaining the Playfair cipher. This tutorial includes rules of the cipher followed by an example to clear things up. This was a part of my final year project to create a learning aid. I decided to upload this so the animation won't go to waste. All feedbacks welcome. Special thanks to Olivia Beck for creating the background image
Views: 160393 Kenny Luminko
22. Cryptography: Encryption
 
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MIT 6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Spring 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-046JS15 Instructor: Srinivas Devadas In this lecture, Professor Devadas continues with cryptography, introducing encryption methods. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 14963 MIT OpenCourseWare
The Zodiac Ciphers - What do we know, and when do we stop trying to solve them?
 
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http://zodiackillerciphers.com This is a talk I gave at the 2015 Cryptologic History Symposium on October 22, 2015. I've been studying the Zodiac ciphers for a while now, and this presentation is a culmination of my research. The talk was part of the "Ciphers and Crime" panel moderated by FBI historian John Fox. Fellow panelists included FBI Cryptanalysis and Racketeering Records Unit chief Dan Olson and encryption technology author Klaus Schmeh. For much more information about the Zodiac Ciphers, please visit http://zodiackillerciphers.com Some bits of the audio dropped out due to technical issues with my sound recorder - apologies for the parts that are hard to understand! BONUS MATERIAL: At the end of the video, I recorded some new material on miscellaneous things I didn't have time to include in the presentation. ERRATA: At 28m59s, I say the 408 is missing a word or phrase between parts 1 and 2. But actually it is missing between parts 2 and 3.
Views: 125334 David Oranchak
Public Key Cryptography: RSA Encryption Algorithm
 
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RSA Public Key Encryption Algorithm (cryptography). How & why it works. Introduces Euler's Theorem, Euler's Phi function, prime factorization, modular exponentiation & time complexity. Link to factoring graph: http://www.khanacademy.org/labs/explorations/time-complexity
Views: 506423 Art of the Problem
Cryptography 101 - Substitution Ciphers
 
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In this video we look at substitution ciphers: how they are made and how to break them.
Views: 55316 Pico Cetef
Lecture 17: Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com
How to Break Cryptography | Infinite Series
 
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Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/donateinfi Only 4 steps stand between you and the secrets hidden behind RSA cryptography. Find out how to crack the world’s most commonly used form of encryption. Tweet at us! @pbsinfinite Facebook: facebook.com/pbsinfinite series Email us! pbsinfiniteseries [at] gmail [dot] com Previous Episode: Can We Combine pi & e into a Rational Number? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG7cCXqcJag&t=25s Links to other resources: Shor's paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9508027v2 Lecture on Shor's Algorithm: https://arxiv.org/pdf/quant-ph/0010034.pdf Blog on Shor's algorithm: http://www.scottaaronson.com/blog/?p=208 Video on RSA cryptography: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXB-V_Keiu8 Another video on RSA cryptography: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zahvcJ9glg Euler's Big Idea: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%27s_theorem (I can find a non-wiki article, but I don't actually use this in the video. It's just where to learn more about the relevant math Euler did.) Written and Hosted by Kelsey Houston-Edwards Produced by Rusty Ward Graphics by Ray Lux Made by Kornhaber Brown (www.kornhaberbrown.com) Challenge Winner - Reddles37 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG7cCXqcJag&lc=z135cnmgxlbwch1ds233sbzgaojkivaz004 Comments answered by Kelsey: Joel David Hamkins https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG7cCXqcJag&lc=z13zdpcwyk2ofhugh04cdh4agsr2whmbsmk0k PCreeper394 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bG7cCXqcJag&lc=z135w324kw21j1qi104cdzvrpoixslmq1jw
Views: 174074 PBS Infinite Series
7Zenith Business Consultancy Blockchain and Cryptography
 
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7Zenith's Blockchain Cryptocurrency First Initiative aims to spotlight Blockchain tech & cryptocurrency in Saudi Arabia & the GCC. We aim to educate and make aware the potential of open, trustless digital payments and contracts. Currently, in the era of change, billions of people’s daily lives are set to be impacted by Blockchain tech in multiple industries from finance & banking, to medicine & healthcare, supply chain management, and even identification & passport services. 7Zenith is embarking on the development of this technology from multiple angles: essential research, acquiring data & informing of the interrelated benefits, risks, and ethical dilemmas. We are actively involved in and fully support Blockchain & Cryptocurrency communities and start-ups in the region, and hope to instill knowledge and form a visionary community in this space. Contact: [email protected] www.7zenith.com
Views: 4046 7Zenith
The World's Greatest Unsolved Ciphers, part 1 - Prof Craig Bauer
 
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Speaker: Prof. Craig Bauer (York College, PA) Title: The World's Greatest Unsolved Ciphers Date: Wednesday, 24-Apr-2013 This is part 1. Abstract: Ciphers that have never been solved from recent times going back hundreds of years, will be detailed. The list includes many lesser-known ciphers that you likely have never seen before. Should be interesting to students and faculty, from math or history or computer science. About the Speaker: Craig Bauer is a cryptography expert who is managing editor of Cryptologia and teaches mathematics at York University in York, PA. His website is http://faculty.ycp.edu/∼cbauer/. He has a book on this subject: "Unsolved! The History and Mystery of the World's Greatest Ciphers from Ancient Egypt to Online Secret Societies", Princeton University Press. Video and editing by me. His slides are posted to http://wdjoyner.org/video/bauer/, by permission of Prof Bauer.
Views: 9797 usnamathweb
The Internet: Encryption & Public Keys
 
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Mia Epner, who works on security for a US national intelligence agency, explains how cryptography allows for the secure transfer of data online. This educational video explains 256 bit encryption, public and private keys, SSL & TLS and HTTPS. Learn more at http://code.org/ Help us translate into your language: http://code.org/translate/videos Stay in touch with us! • on Twitter https://twitter.com/codeorg • on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Code.org • on Instagram https://instagram.com/codeorg • on Tumblr https://blog.code.org • on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/code... • on Google+ https://google.com/+codeorg Help us caption & translate this video! https://amara.org/v/HGaS/
Views: 185659 Code.org
Lecture 20: Hash Functions by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com
Polygraphic Part 2 - Hill Ciphers Examples/Encryption/Decryption
 
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A beginner's guide to Polygraphic Ciphers, Part 2. (Hill Ciphers Examples/Encryption/Decryption)
Views: 98333 Daniel Rees
Cryptographic Key Management APIs - Graham Steel
 
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Most developers use cryptography via an application program interface (API) either to a software library or a hardware device where keys are stored and all cryptographic operations take place. Designing such interfaces so that they offer flexible functionality but cannot be abused to reveal keys or secrets has proved to be extremely difficult, with a number of published vulnerabilities in widely-used crypto APIs appearing over the last decade. This lecture will focus on the example of RSA PKCS#11, the most widely used interface for cryptographic devices, but will allow us to develop principles and concepts that apply to most crypto APIs. We will demonstrate a tool, Tookan, which can reverse engineer the particular configuration of PKCS#11 in use on some device under test, construct a model of the device's functionality, and call a model checker to search for attacks. If an attack is found, it can be executed automatically on the device. We will also look at attacks related to the implementation of cryptography. This lecture follows naturally from the general introduction to security APIs, but is independent in the sense that it is disjoint and self-contained. Learning objectives basic design of cryptographic APIs logical flaws in key management cryptographic flaws in implementations The lecture was delivered at SecAppDev 2013 in Leuven, Belgium, by Graham Steel. Graham Steel holds a masters in mathematics from the University of Cambridge and a PhD in informatics from the University of Edinburgh. He is currently a researcher at INRIA, the French national agency for computer science research, where he is part of the Prosecco project team based in central Paris. Steel's main research interests are in formal analysis of information security and applied cryptography. His current work on cryptographic API verification involves using formal techniques to construct and analyse abstract models of cryptographic device interfaces. In addition to international conference and journal publications, his recent results have featured in Wired magazine and the New York Times. He has taught courses on security APIs at Tsinghua University (Beijing) and the University of Venice (Italy) as well as organising a Dagstuhl seminar on the subject.
Views: 4974 secappdev.org
Professor Avi Wigderson on cryptography
 
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Avi Wigderson is a professor of Mathematics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. After studying Computer Science at Technion in Haifa, he obtained his PhD in 1983 from Princeton University. He held then various visiting positions including IBM Research at San Jose, MSRI Berkeley, and IAS Princeton. From 1986 to 2003 he was associate professor at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Wigderson has been for two decades a leading figure in the field of Mathematics of Computer Science, with fundamental contributions, in particular in Complexity Theory, Randomness, and Cryptography. He has been invited speaker at ICM in Tokyo (1990), and Zurich (1994), and plenary speaker in Madrid (2006). Among many awards he received both the Nevanlinna Prize (1994), and the Gödel Prize (2009). This lecture about cryptography was hold on 8 May 2012 at ETH Zurich, when Avi Wigderson was invited as guest speaker of the Wolfgang Pauli Lectures. The Wolfgang Pauli Lectures are an annual lecture series that is devoted alternately to physics, mathematics and biology. They are named after the great theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate Wolfgang Pauli, who was professor at ETH Zurich from 1928 until his death in 1958.
Views: 5742 ETH Zürich
Cybersecurity: Crash Course Computer Science #31
 
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Cybersecurity is a set of techniques to protect the secrecy, integrity, and availability of computer systems and data against threats. In today’s episode, we’re going to unpack these three goals and talk through some strategies we use like passwords, biometrics, and access privileges to keep our information as secure, but also as accessible as possible. From massive Denial of Service, or DDos attacks, to malware and brute force password cracking there are a lot of ways for hackers to gain access to your data, so we’ll also discuss some strategies like creating strong passwords, and using 2-factor authentication, to keep your information safe. Check out Computerphile’s wonderful video on how to choose a password! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NjQ9b3pgIg Pre-order our limited edition Crash Course: Computer Science Floppy Disk Coasters here! https://store.dftba.com/products/computer-science-coasters Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 314928 CrashCourse
Stanford Seminar - The Evolution of Public Key Cryptography
 
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EE380: Computer Systems Colloquium Seminar The Evolution of Public Key Cryptography Speaker: Martin Hellman, Stanford EE (Emeritus) While public key cryptography is seen as revolutionary, after this talk you might wonder why it took Whit Diffie, Ralph Merkle and Hellman so long to discover it. This talk also highlights the contributions of some unsung (or "under-sung") heroes: Ralph Merkle, John Gill, Stephen Pohlig, Richard Schroeppel, Loren Kohnfelder, and researchers at GCHQ (Ellis, Cocks, and Williamson). Resources and Reading Materials M. E. Hellman, Cybersecurity, Nuclear Security, Alan Turing, and Illogical Logic (http://www-ee.stanford.edu/ %7Ehellman/publications/77.pdf), Communications of the ACM, Vol. 60, No. 12, pp. 52-59, December 2017. This is a written version of Martin Hellman's ACM Turing Lecture (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I132wSwAI3o) and was accompanied by a short (6 minute) video (https://vimeo.com/241030842). Other materials and hard to find references can be found on Martin Hellman's Stanford website, http://www-ee.stanford.edu/~hellman/ . About the Speaker: Martin E. Hellman is Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University and is affiliated with the university's Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). His recent technical work has focused on bringing a risk informed framework to a potential failure of nuclear deterrence and then using that approach to find surprising ways to reduce the risk. His earlier work included co- inventing public key cryptography, the technology that underlies the secure portion of the Internet. His many honors include election to the National Academy of Engineering and receiving (jointly with his colleague Whit Diffie) the million dollar ACM Turing Award, the top prize in computer science. His most recent project is a book, jointly written with his wife of fifty years, "A New Map for Relationships: Creating True Love at Home & Peace on the Planet," that provides a "unified field theory" of peace by illuminating the connections between nuclear war, conventional war, interpersonal war, and war within our own psyches. For more information about this seminar and its speaker, you can visit https://ee380.stanford.edu/Abstracts/180307.html Support for the Stanford Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series provided by the Stanford Computer Forum. Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series (EE380) presents the current research in design, implementation, analysis, and use of computer systems. Topics range from integrated circuits to operating systems and programming languages. It is free and open to the public, with new lectures each week. Learn more: http://bit.ly/WinYX5
Views: 1464 stanfordonline
Transposition Ciphers - Encryption/Decryption
 
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A beginner's guide to Transposition Ciphers (Encryption/Decryption).
Views: 69043 Daniel Rees
Hashing Techniques Hash Function, Types of Hashing Techniques in Hindi and English
 
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Hashing Techniques Hash Function, Types of Hashing Techniques in Hindi and English * Direct Hashing * Modulo-Division Hashing * Mid-Square Hashing * Folding Hashing - Fold-Shift Hashing and Fold Boundary Hashing * PseudoRandom Hashing * Subtraction Hashing For Students of B.Tech, B.E, MCA, BCA, B.Sc., M.Sc., Courses - As Per IP University Syllabus and Other Engineering Courses
Views: 157893 Easy Engineering Classes
Cicada 3301: An Internet Mystery
 
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In this video I explore an elaborate cryptographic internet puzzle orchestrated by a mysterious individual or group known as Cicada 3301. Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/lemmino Subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/lemmino Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/lemmin0 Facebook: https://www.fb.com/lemmin0 Discord: https://www.discord.gg/lemmino The puzzle I hid in this video has been solved: https://www.lemmi.no/post/my-latest-puzzle [Music] Own work Erang - Forever Lost In An Endless Dream https://erang.bandcamp.com/track/forever-lost-in-an-endless-dream Erang - The Highway Goes Ever On https://erang.bandcamp.com/track/the-highway-goes-ever-on Erang - Silent Bones https://erang.bandcamp.com/track/silent-bones-2 Cicada 3301 - The Instar Emergence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YA1fONCH-CY Cicada 3301 - Interconnectedness https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ActGqDxBD4A [References] https://www.lemmi.no/cicada-3301
Views: 8327549 LEMMiNO
The science of secrecy
 
01:36:50
Join Imperial's Institute for Security Science and Technology for an informative presentation on codes, ciphers and computers. Professor Richard Aldrich, Dr Martin Knight, Professor Sir Peter Knight and Dr Simon Singh take you on a tour of cryptography through the ages. From its beginnings in pen and paper to its future in quantum computing. Professor David Edgerton, Hans Rausing Chair in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine at Imperial College London, will chair the panel: The beginnings of cryptography - Dr Simon Singh, science writer, journalist, TV producer, Imperial alumnus and author of 'The code book' Bletchley Park and the greatest secret in WWII - Dr Martin Knight, Chairman of Imperial Innovations and former Chief Operating Officer at Imperial College London Intelligence gathering in the Cold War - Professor Richard Aldrich, Professor of International Security at the University of Warwick and author of 'GCHQ: the uncensored story of Britain's most secret intelligence agency' Quantum cryptography - Professor Sir Peter Knight FRS, President elect of the Institute of Physics, Principal of the Kavli Royal Society International Centre and Senior Research Investigator at Imperial College London For more information please visit : http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/eventssummary/event_14-7-2011-14-15-33
"The Lost Symbol" - Magic Squares and the Masonic Cipher
 
43:15
December 2, 2009 Dan Brown? The Lost Symbol? Masonic cipher? Albrecht Durers magic square? If you know about these things AND you can decipher the message below, then dont bother coming because you know as much as I do. If you dont know about them OR you cant decipher the message below, then by all means come and hear my presentation. Yes, we do have pizza. Ed Brumgnach http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/ecet/magicSquares.asp
Views: 834323 CUNYQueensborough
A Short History of Cryptography - A Brief History of Cryptography
 
44:55
A Short History of Cryptography - A Brief History of Cryptography
Views: 31199 fb
DEF CON 24 Crypto and Privacy Village - David Wong - How to Backdoor Diffie-Hellman
 
38:24
Lately, several backdoors in cryptographic constructions, protocols and implementations have been surfacing in the wild: Dual-EC in RSA's B-Safe product, a modified Dual-EC in Juniper's operating system ScreenOS and a non-prime modulus in the open-source tool socat. Many papers have already discussed the fragility of cryptographic constructions not using nothing-up-my-sleeve numbers, as well as how such numbers can be safely picked. However, the question of how to introduce a backdoor in an already secure, safe and easy to audit implementation has so far rarely been researched (in the public). BIO: David Wong (Twitter: @lyon01_david) is a Security Consultant at the Cryptography Services team of NCC Group. He has been working in Security for over a year now, being part of several publicly funded open source audits such as the OpenSSL and the Let's Encrypt ones. He has conducted research in many domains in cryptography, publishing whitepapers as well as writing numerous editions of the Cryptography Services private bulletin. He has been a trainer for cryptography courses at BlackHat US 2015 and BlackHat US 2016.
Views: 3245 DEFCONConference
Lecture 16: Introduction to Elliptic Curves by Christof Paar
 
01:20:42
For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com (Don't worry, I start in German but at minute 2:00 I am switiching to English for the remainder of the lecture :)
Криптография (Cryptography) Шифрование данных и дешифровка Encryption and Decryption RSA
 
02:03
Криптография - это наука об обеспечении безопасности данных. Она занимается поисками решений четырех важных проблем безопасности - конфиденциальности, аутентификации, целостности и контроля участников взаимодействия. Шифрование - это преобразование данных в нечитабельную форму, используя ключи шифрования-расшифровки. Шифрование позволяет обеспечить конфиденциальность, сохраняя информацию в тайне от того, кому она не предназначена. ➤ Для удобства участникам передачи зашифрованного сообщения дают следующие имена: Алиса — отправитель, Боб — получатель, Ева — пассивный перехватчик, Меллори (Man-in-the-middle) — активный перехватчик, может не только перехватывать передачу, но и подменять содержимое. ➤ Криптография не занимается: защитой от обмана, подкупа или шантажа законных абонентов, кражи #ключей и других угроз информации, возникающих в защищенных системах передачи #данных. ➤ Криптография — одна из старейших наук, её #история насчитывает несколько тысяч лет. Ещё в древнем Риме Гай Юлий Цезарь, который совершенно не доверял гонцам, опасаясь что те прочтут его письма, прибегал к #шифрам. Для того, чтобы избежать вероятности того, что гонец всё же осмелится и захочет прочесть послание Цезаря, он, отправляя письма генералам, менял каждую букву на D, каждую B на E, и так далее. И лишь те, кто знал правило «сдвига на 3» мог расшифровать его послание. Проблема защиты информации и сегодня является наверное одной из самых актуальных. Шифрованием, кодированием и многими другими методами, созданными для обеспечения конфиденциальности информации занимается одна из древнейших наук – криптография. Какие шифры бывают и есть ли системы шифрования,которые невозможно взломать и раскрыть? Какие методы и системы защиты информации использует криптография? Как можно защитить себя от атаки хакеров? Об этом расскажут: кандидат психологических наук - Сергей Николаевич Ениколопов, кандидат физико-математических наук - Иван Владимирович Чижов и доктор физико-математических наук - Владимир Сергеевич Анашин ➤ Изначально криптография изучала методы шифрования информации — обратимого преобразования открытого (исходного) текста на основе секретного #алгоритма или ключа в шифрованный #текст (шифротекст). Традиционная #криптография образует раздел симметричных криптосистем, в которых зашифрование и расшифрование проводится с использованием одного и того же секретного ключа. Помимо этого раздела современная криптография включает в себя асимметричные криптосистемы, системы электронной цифровой подписи (ЭЦП), хеш-функции, управление ключами #key, получение скрытой информации, #квантовую криптографию. ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ►► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ► ICOTRACKER.NET специализируется на оценке компании с запланированным ICO "ИКО". Анализ #icotracker является тщательным и объективным анализом компаний в качестве потенциальных объектов инвестирования. ♐ ICO (Initial Coin Offer) - начальное распределение (предложение) монет! ♐ AirDrops и закрытое распределение монет на примере #PostCoin и #AuroraCoin ♐ Баунти "bounty" криптовалют на примере #Wings DAO ╔══════════════════════════════════════════════════════╗ ➥ Ждём от вас комментарии, вопросы, конструктивную критику и предложение ICO стартапов, которые на Ваше усмотрение есть интересны и мы их разобрали в следующих обзорах! ╚══════════════════════════════════════════════════════╝ ░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ ☛ Канал "ICO startups mining" посвящен рекомендациям, обзорам, презентациям проверенных стратегий заработка в Интернете как без вложений, так и с минимальными инвестициями. Это знания и навыки, которые позволят вам зарабатывать в интернете те деньги, о которых вы мечтаете, а со временем - обрести финансовую свободу и независимость. ☛ Криптоаналитика и подробная информация об инвестиционных возможностях рынка электронных валют. Обзор новых проектов ICO, информация о рабочих blockchain-решениях, обмен опытом и консультации! ☛ Новости мира криптовалют, децентрализованных технологий, денежных систем и современных финансовых технологий. ░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ ╔══════════════════════════════════════════════════════╗ ➤ подписывайся на канал - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0Dc6MqKvry3geBNcakmu-g ➤ Skype: Кaznachej123 ➤ Тelegram: https://telegram.me/icostart1 ➤ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Kaznachej123 ➤ я зарабатываю здесь: https://icotracker.net ➤ Skype чат майнеров: https://join.skype.com/jgKBOiMc1vZv ➤ Skype чат BlockCDN майнинг: https://join.skype.com/dmfsXdYEfAnf ╚══════════════════════════════════════════════════════╝
Views: 802 ICO startups
What is a trapdoor function?
 
04:06
Modern cryptography depends on the existence of several special kinds of mathematical functions. One important kind is a trapdoor function. Trapdoor functions are somewhat similar to hash functions in that they are easy to compute but hard to invert…​ except if you know a secret piece of information. So if someone does not have the secret or key, they cannot invert the function. If they do, they can open the trapdoor and invert the function. Trapdoor functions form the basis of modern cryptographic techniques that are widely-used online. Credits: Talking: Geoffrey Challen (Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, University at Buffalo). Producing: Greg Bunyea (Undergraduate, Computer Science and Engineering, University at Buffalo). Part of the https://www.internet-class.org online internet course. A blue Systems Research Group (https://blue.cse.buffalo.edu) production.
Views: 7299 internet-class
Symmetric key Encryption
 
01:41
Imagine Sara,She buys a bag full of padlocks that all use exactly the same key.Then she distributes the padlocks to her friends- open,but without a key. Now when her friend (suppose Jhon)wants to send something,he puts it in a box and then he locks the box with the padlock (padlock given by Sara ). Once jhon closes the padlock by simply pushing the lock handle (without any key) ,sara is the only one that can open it again,as she is having the only key... and her friends can send her messages but sara is the only one who can open them... Give this video a BIG THUMBS UP if it helped! Share this Video:https: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pKsFtPndYw Subscribe To Our Channel and Get More Great videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB-r... Here is a Metaphore video that explains this concept in easy way..Hope you will like it!!!
Views: 3358 The Sharp Turtles
Extended Euclidean Algorithm and Inverse Modulo Tutorial
 
06:00
Using EA and EEA to solve inverse mod.
Views: 338839 Emily Jane
Wireless Authentication and Key Generation
 
23:38
A walk through wireless authentication using both WPA/WPA2 PSK and 802.1x, and a look at where our encryption keys come from.
Views: 31161 Brett Hill
DES Encryption using OpenSSL
 
12:49
Screencast of performing DES encryption using OpenSSL on Ubuntu Linux. Commands/files user: openssl, /dev/urandom, xxd. Created by Steven Gordon on 27 January 2012 at Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology, Thammasat University, Thailand.
Views: 13111 Steven Gordon
The World's Greatest Unsolved Ciphers, part 2 - Prof Craig Bauer
 
35:22
Speaker: Prof. Craig Bauer (York College, PA) Title: The World's Greatest Unsolved Ciphers Date: Wednesday, 24-Apr-2013 This is part 2. Abstract: Ciphers that have never been solved from recent times going back hundreds of years, will be detailed. The list includes many lesser-known ciphers that you likely have never seen before. Should be interesting to students and faculty, from math or history or computer science. About the Speaker: Craig Bauer is a cryptography expert who is managing editor of Cryptologia and teaches mathematics at York University in York, PA. His website is http://faculty.ycp.edu/∼cbauer/. He has a book on this subject: "Unsolved! The History and Mystery of the World's Greatest Ciphers from Ancient Egypt to Online Secret Societies", Princeton University Press. Video and editing by me. His slides are posted to http://wdjoyner.org/video/bauer/, by permission of Prof Bauer.
Views: 5840 usnamathweb
Caesar Cipher
 
02:16
This tutorial will teach you how to encrypt and decrypt messages using the Caesar Cipher.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 118970 Lacey Wright
ShmooCon 2014: SafeCurves: Choosing Safe Curves for Elliptic-Curve Cryptography
 
01:02:25
For more information visit: http://bit.ly/shmooc14 To download the video visit: http://bit.ly/shmooc14_down Playlist Shmoocon 2014: http://bit.ly/shmooc14_pl Speakers: Daniel J. Bernstein | Tanja Lange There are several different standards covering selection of curves for use in elliptic-curve cryptography (ECC). Each of these standards tries to ensure that the elliptic-curve discrete-logarithm problem (ECDLP) is difficult. ECDLP is the problem of finding an ECC user's secret key, given the user's public key. Unfortunately, there is a gap between ECDLP difficulty and ECC security. None of these standards do a good job of ensuring ECC security. There are many attacks that break real-world ECC without solving ECDLP. The core problem is that if you implement the standard curves, chances are you're doing it wrong: Your implementation produces incorrect results for some rare curve points. Your implementation leaks secret data when the input isn't a curve point. Your implementation leaks secret data through branch timing. Your implementation leaks secret data through cache timing. These problems are exploitable by real attackers, taking advantage of the gaps between ECDLP and real-world ECC. Secure implementations of the standard curves are theoretically possible but very hard. Most of these attacks would have been ruled out by better choices of curves that allow simple implementations to be secure implementations. This is the primary motivation for SafeCurves, http://safecurves.cr.yp.to/. The SafeCurves criteria are designed to ensure ECC security, not just ECDLP security.
Views: 1513 Christiaan008
DES -- The Algorithm
 
09:06
DES -- Data Encryption Standard -- has been the workhorse of modern cryptography for many decades. It has never been compromised mathematically (not in the open literature, at least), yet, its design notes were never made public either. Many who use it are unaware of how it works. Here we open the DES box and find inside a repetition of sub-boxes in which very simple primitives are at work: substitution, transposition, split, concatenation, and bit-wise operation. DES inside teaches us that complexity is comprised of a lot of simplicity.
Views: 137058 Gideon Samid
Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) v8 (Exam 312-50) - 11. Cryptography
 
01:23:30
This course provides step-by-step demonstrations of the different methods and tools needed to master the exam, as well as the concepts and knowledge a professional ethical hacker needs for the real world. The course covers all areas tested on the exam, including system hacking, network attacks, web application hacking, and cryptography. Parts: 1. Cryptography Intro (05:35) 2. Algorithms and Keys (06:09) 3. CrypToolDemo (06:09) 4. Types of Encryption (05:51) 5. Encryption Algorithms (06:31) 6. Hashing (05:12) 7. Hashing Tools (06:14) 8. PKI pt. 1 (05:54) 9. PKI pt. 2 (06:13) 10. Digital Signatures (04:41) 11. File Encryption (06:29) 12. Disk Encryption (05:39) 13. Cryptography Attacks pt. 1 (06:18) 14. Cryptography Attacks pt. 2 (06:34)
Views: 970 Free Training