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Uncharted Territory: David Thompson on the Columbia Plateau
 
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View more from our digital library: http://video.ksps.org/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ksps Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/KSPSPublicTV Find the latest programming updates: #WhatsOnKSPS David Thompson is revered as a national hero in Canada, but is less well known to Americans. "Uncharted Territory: David Thompson on the Columbia Plateau" focuses on the years 1807-1812, the time that Thompson spent primarily in the Canadian Rocky Mountains and northwestern United States, and the significant contributions that he made to the history of the American Northwest. KSPS exists to improve the quality of life of each person we reach. KSPS content broadens horizons; engages and connects; enlightens, inspires and educates. KSPS is an international multimedia network providing quality programming.
Views: 375884 KSPS Public TV
The World As I See It by Albert Einstein
 
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Support New Wellness Living and this 'New Thought Series': Via Paypal: paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=PQRGZ58MG9EDA The World as I See It is a book by Albert Einstein published in 1949. Composed of assorted articles, addresses, letters, interviews and pronouncements published before 1935, it includes Einstein's opinions on the meaning of life, ethics, science, society, religion, and politics. These fragments form a mosaic portrait of Einstein the man. Each one is, in a sense, complete in itself; it presents his views on some aspect of progress, education, peace, war, liberty, or other problems of universal interest. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist and philosopher of science. He developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). He is best known in popular culture for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation"). He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect". The latter was pivotal in establishing quantum theory. Near the beginning of his career, Einstein thought that Newtonian mechanics was no longer enough to reconcile the laws of classical mechanics with the laws of the electromagnetic field. This led to the development of his special theory of relativity. He realized, however, that the principle of relativity could also be extended to gravitational fields, and with his subsequent theory of gravitation in 1916, he published a paper on the general theory of relativity. He continued to deal with problems of statistical mechanics and quantum theory, which led to his explanations of particle theory and the motion of molecules. He also investigated the thermal properties of light which laid the foundation of the photon theory of light. In 1917, Einstein applied the general theory of relativity to model the large-scale structure of the universe. Einstein published more than 300 scientific papers along with over 150 non-scientific works. His intellectual achievements and originality have made the word "Einstein" synonymous with genius. Source: Wikipedia.org
Views: 19242 New Wellness Living 2
OurTown: The Cove (Pledge)
 
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Our Town: The Cove is the 91st program in our twenty-year old Our Town series. Our Town: The Cove features Martinsburg, Roaring Spring and the surrounding areas. The program highlights stories from friends and neighbors that include Mamie’s Café, the community chorus, pigmy goats, the YMCA and the high school marching band.
Views: 657 wpsu
Jason Felch, "Chasing Aphrodite": Authors at Google
 
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From Google Books: In recent years, several of America's leading art museums have voluntarily given up their finest pieces of classical art to the governments of Italy and Greece. The monetary value is estimated at over half a billion dollars. Why would they be moved to such unheard-of generosity? The answer lies at the Getty, one of the world's richest and most troubled museums, and scandalous revelations that it had been buying looted antiquities for decades. Drawing on a trove of confidential museum records and frank interviews, Felch and Frammolino give us a fly-on-the-wall account of the inner workings of a world-class museum and tell the story of the Getty's dealings in the illegal antiquities trade. The outlandish characters and bad behavior could come straight from the pages of a thriller—the wealthy recluse founder, the cagey Italian art investigator, the playboy curator, the narcissist CEO—but their chilling effects on the rest of the art world have been all too real, as the authors show in novelistic detail. Fast-paced and compelling, Chasing Aphrodite exposes the layer of dirt beneath the polished façade of the museum business.
Views: 3649 Talks at Google
Nepal Earthquake Summit:  GOVERNMENT RESPONSE KEYNOTE ADDRESS
 
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Nepal Earthquake Summit The 2016 Leila and Melville Straus 1960 Family Symposium will focus on the response to the April 2015 earthquake in Nepal. GOVERNMENT RESPONSE KEYNOTE ADDRESS FILENE AUDITORIUM 4:30-6:00pm, Keynote Address by Swarnim Waglé, former Member of Nepal's National Planning Commission. In the aftermath of the Nepal Earthquake, Waglé helped prepare the national Post Disaster Needs Assessment and led the official Nepali delegation to the Third UN Conference on Financing for Development.
Views: 2722 Dartmouth
Introduction
 
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Featuring discussions of cosmopolitanism and deliberative democracy; Raymond Williams's model of dominant, residual, and emergent cultures; Puritanism and Jeffersonianism; the horizon of expectations and the aesthetics of reception; canonization; ideology; and American Exceptionalism.
Views: 44047 New York University
Parents of the Field: Dennis Sandole
 
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Dennis Sandole was one of the original appointees to the faculty of the M.S. program on Conflict Analysis and Resolution at GMU in 1981. He has been the mainstay of the teaching program since then and has worked with the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe, US Agency for International Development (USAID), Partners for Democratic Change, and the Council of Europe. http://scar.gmu.edu/parents
The Liberal Arts and the Professions
 
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Washington and Lee University hosted a panel discussion on “The Liberal Arts and the Professions” as part of William C. Dudley’s inauguration as the university’s 27th president. The panel is moderated by Suzanne Keen, dean of the College and Thomas H. Broadus Professor of English. Panelists include Kelly Evans Chemi ’07, representing journalism; William H. Miller III ’72 representing finance; Dr. Harold E. Varmus representing medicine; and the Hon. Gregory H. Woods representing law.
How to Clean Your Panama Jack Greased Leather Boots
 
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Tutorial on how to clean your Panama Jack greased leather Boots. Maintain your boots in the best condition by following these simple steps. Care and cleaning of your Panama Jacks http://bit.ly/2mSU4J3 Buy a care kit http://bit.ly/2lBcXiF
Views: 18656 Panama Jack
WE ARE STILL HERE In depth preview Lakota docuementary
 
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An in depth preview of the upcoming documentary WE ARE STILL HERE by Value Creaton Films www.facebook.com/valuecreationfilms about Lakota life in the 21st century. Presented in association with SAVE OUR TRIBAL YOUTH www.saveourtribalyouth.com and Crawford Multi Media www.crawafordmultimedia.com
Views: 31186 Rick Kline
Russia: What to Expect From Putin
 
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Experts discuss Russia’s involvement in Ukraine and Syria, its relations with Europe and the United States, and what to expect from President Putin next. Speakers: Derek H. Chollet, Counselor and Senior Advisor for Security and Defense Policy, German Marshall Fund of the United States Agnia Grigas, Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council; Senior Fellow, McKinnon Center for Global Affairs, Occidental College; Author, Beyond Crimea: The New Russian Empire Stephen Sestanovich, George F. Kennon Senior Fellow for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Council on Foreign Relations Presider: Nadia Diuk, Vice President, Programs, National Endowment for Democracy
"Wandering with Firm Purpose: Raphael Lemkin's Crusade to Stop Genocide" | Robert Skloot
 
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Title: "Wandering with Firm Purpose: Raphael Lemkin's Crusade to Stop Genocide" September 16, 2014 Lecturer: Dr. Robert Skloot, Playwright; Professor at the Department of Theater and Drama and in the Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison from 1968 to 2008 Ida E. King Distinguished Scholar during Fall 2014
Across the Aisle with Charlie Baker
 
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Please join Governor Charlie Baker, Senator Ed Markey, MA Secretary of Health and Human Services Marylou Sudder, and Middlesex County Sheriff Peter Koutoujian in a discussion of the opioid epidemic. This will be moderated by WBZ-TV News' Political Analyst Jon Keller
50 Tech Tips You Should Absolutely Know
 
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The presenters on this webinar were: Patrick Noonan, Minnesota Legal Services Coalition Kate Bladow, Techno.la Tony Lu, Pro Bono Net Travis August, Pro Bono Net Work smarter, not harder. The presenters in this webinar covered a host of really cool applications and programs which they have found useful in their professional lives. Highlights include: a Universal Decision Maker, several scheduling assistants, and online ways to create attractive and informative visuals. Check it out! Feedback survey available here: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DF3PSJN
Views: 4875 NTAPvideos
DRIVE's Le Mans LiveStream - Part 2
 
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The Le Mans 24 is the world's premiere motorsport event. Watch with us! /DRIVE's groundbreaking 25 Hours of Le Mans Livestream is the ultimate online companion any Le Mans broadcast. So, pull up a laptop, hang out, and chat with the /DRIVE team as we bring you hourly race analysis, on-scene interviews, commentary, and full-contact spectating. Part 8 - 1:27:43 Part 9 - 2:22:08 Part 10 - 3:21:29 Part 11 - 4:22:58 Part 12 - 5:25:26
Views: 14394 THE DRIVE
Peter Pilewskie Maniac Lecture, May 24, 2017
 
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Dr. Peter Pilewskie, Professor, University of Colorado Boulder presented a Maniac lecture entitled, "Better to be Lucky than Good …" Peter talked about how he became a scientist, the things that roused his curiosity, and the generosity of some remarkable people who provided inspiration and guidance along the way. It is a tale of uncommonly good fortune – sometimes it really is better to be lucky than good!
Views: 267 GSFC MANIAC
Michael King Maniac Lecture, 3 July, 2013
 
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NASA climate scientist (emeritus) Dr. Michael King presented a Maniac Talk entitled "From a Love of Nature to a World of Earth Observations." Michael shared his scientific career including early unsuccessful pursuits in atmospheric electricity to more rewarding research in radiative transfer, and his crystal ball view of the future of Earth science.
Views: 421 GSFC MANIAC
UC Santa Cruz Emeriti Lecture Series presents Helene Moglen, "From Facebook to Frankenstein"
 
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Emeriti Lecture Helene Moglen - From Frankenstein to Facebook http://news.ucsc.edu/2013/10/moglen-emeriti-lecture.html October 29, 2013
Views: 563 UC Santa Cruz
The Secret of the Silver Car by Wyndham Martyn
 
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Before he went to join the Armed Forces in World War I France, Anthony Trent had a successfull secret 'career' as a master criminal in the USA, never caught by the police. The war has just ended - but now Anthony Trent seriously fears exposure. While in the trenches, an explosion buried him alive, along with an English soldier. Thinking they would never get out alive, Anthony revealed his identity to the other soldier - just before they were rescued and separated. After recovering from his injuries, all Anthony can think about is finding the English soldier - to thank him for saving his life, but also to know whether the man will betray his big secret. His search is full of adventures, including espionage, blackmail and love. Chapter 1. The Puzzling Passenger - 00:00 Chapter 2. The Man in the Dark - 19:48 Chapter 3. The Beginning of the Search - 36:49 Chapter 4. A Lady Interrupts - 1:33:56 Chapter 5. The Man who Denied - 1:58:37 Chapter 6. Fresh Fields - 2:30:04 Chapter 7. The Sentence of Banishment - 2:56:54 Chapter 8. Count Michael Temesvar - 3:17:58 Chapter 9. Pauline - 3:37:11 Chapter 10. The Greater Game - 4:19:32 Chapter 11. Anthony Plays His Hand - 4:37:12 Chapter 12. Saint Anthony - 5:18:40 Chapter 13. Down to the Sea - 5:51:26 Chapter 14. The Cabinet Meeting - 6:36:15 Chapter 15. Anthony the Triumphant - 6:52:12 This is preceded by "Anthony Trent, Master Criminal": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCbt81C-Z8o
Views: 1769 Audiobooks Unleashed
Life on the Mississippi By Mark Twain [Part 2/5] VideoBook
 
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Life on the Mississippi is a memoir by Mark Twain detailing his days as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River before the American Civil War. A good portion of the work also deals with his post-war visit to the "old haunts". Download our Channel App Here To Watch Directly From your Android Device https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.MysticBookz.blogspot Visit our Website to see a collection http://www.mysticbooks.org Like us on Facebook here https://www.facebook.com/MysticBooks.org Keep updated here https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/104517179947301552098/104517179947301552098/posts
Views: 1037 Mystic Books
Otto Hahn | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Otto Hahn 00:01:15 1 Early life 00:03:55 2 Research in London and Montreal (1904–1906) 00:04:09 2.1 Discovery of radiothorium and other "new elements" 00:07:54 3 Research in Berlin (1906–1944) 00:08:06 3.1 Discovery of mesothorium I (Ra 228) 00:10:04 3.2 Discovery of radioactive recoil 00:11:25 3.3 Marriage with Edith Junghans 00:12:43 3.4 World War I 00:14:59 3.5 Discovery of protactinium 00:16:06 3.6 Discovery of nuclear isomerism 00:16:58 4 iApplied Radiochemistry/i 00:19:39 5 Discovery of nuclear fission (1938) 00:28:50 6 Internment in England (1945) 00:31:30 7 The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1944 00:36:15 8 Founder and President of the Max Planck Society 00:37:48 9 Spokesman for social responsibility 00:43:53 10 Honors and awards 00:48:19 11 Death 00:50:12 12 Legacy 00:53:45 13 Publications in English 00:54:40 14 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Otto Hahn (8 March 1879 – 28 July 1968) was a German chemist and pioneer in the fields of radioactivity and radiochemistry. He is referred to as the father of nuclear chemistry. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1944 for the discovery and the radiochemical proof of nuclear fission. This process is exploited by nuclear reactors and is one of the basics of nuclear weapons that were developed in the U.S. during World War II. He served as the last President of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society (KWG) in 1946 and as the founding President of the Max Planck Society (MPG) from 1948 to 1960. Considered by many to be a model for scholarly excellence and personal integrity, he became one of the most influential and respected citizens of the new postwar country West Germany. Hahn was an opponent of national socialism and Jewish persecution by the Nazi Party. Albert Einstein wrote that Hahn was "one of the very few who stood upright and did the best he could in these years of evil". After World War II, Hahn became a passionate campaigner against the use of nuclear energy as a weapon.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Judah P. Benjamin | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Judah P. Benjamin 00:02:30 1 Early and personal life 00:08:18 2 Louisiana lawyer 00:11:33 3 Electoral career 00:11:43 3.1 State politician 00:15:36 3.2 Mexican railroad 00:16:44 3.3 Election to the Senate 00:19:20 3.4 Spokesman for slavery 00:23:20 3.5 Secession crisis 00:27:55 4 Confederate statesman 00:28:04 4.1 Attorney General 00:31:39 4.2 Secretary of War 00:38:58 4.3 Confederate Secretary of State 00:39:26 4.3.1 Basis of Confederate foreign policy 00:41:49 4.3.2 Appointment 00:43:27 4.3.3 Early days (1862–1863) 00:48:14 4.3.4 Increasing desperation (1863–1865) 00:52:52 5 Escape 00:57:41 6 Exile 01:03:22 7 Appraisal 01:09:25 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Judah Philip Benjamin, QC (August 11, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was a lawyer and politician who was a United States Senator from Louisiana, a Cabinet officer of the Confederate States and, after his escape to the United Kingdom at the end of the American Civil War, an English barrister. Benjamin was the first Jew to be elected to the United States Senate who had not renounced that faith, and was the first Jew to hold a Cabinet position in North America. Benjamin was born to Sephardic Jewish parents from London, who had moved to St. Croix in the Danish West Indies when it was occupied by Britain during the Napoleonic Wars. Seeking greater opportunities, his family immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in Charleston, South Carolina. Judah Benjamin attended Yale College but left without graduating. He moved to New Orleans, where he read law and passed the bar. Benjamin rose rapidly both at the bar and in politics. He became a wealthy planter and slaveowner and was elected to and served in both houses of the Louisiana legislature prior to his election by the legislature to the US Senate in 1852. There, he was an eloquent supporter of slavery. After Louisiana seceded in 1861, Benjamin resigned as senator and returned to New Orleans. He soon moved to Richmond after Confederate President Jefferson Davis appointed him as Attorney General. Benjamin had little to do in that position, but Davis was impressed by his competence and appointed him as Secretary of War. Benjamin firmly supported Davis, and the President reciprocated the loyalty by promoting him to Secretary of State in March 1862, while Benjamin was being criticized for the rebel defeat at the Battle of Roanoke Island. As Secretary of State, Benjamin attempted to gain official recognition for the Confederacy by France and the United Kingdom, but his efforts were ultimately unsuccessful. To preserve the Confederacy as military defeats made its situation increasingly desperate, he advocated freeing and arming the slaves late in the war, but his proposals were only partially accepted in the closing month of the war. When Davis fled the Confederate capital of Richmond in early 1865, Benjamin went with him. He left the presidential party and was successful in escaping from the mainland United States, but Davis was captured by Union troops. Benjamin sailed to Great Britain, where he settled and became a barrister, again rising to the top of his profession before retiring in 1883. He died in Paris the following year.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Harry S. Truman | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Harry S. Truman Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953), taking office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. A World War I veteran, he assumed the presidency during the waning months of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War. He is known for implementing the Marshall Plan to rebuild the economy of Western Europe, for establishing the Truman Doctrine and NATO against Soviet and Chinese Communism, and for intervening in the Korean War. In domestic affairs, he was a moderate Democrat whose liberal proposals were a continuation of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, but the conservative-dominated Congress blocked most of them. He used the veto power 180 times, more than any president since, and saw 12 overridden by Congress; only Grover Cleveland and Franklin D. Roosevelt used the veto more often, and only Gerald Ford and Andrew Johnson saw so many veto overrides. He is the only world leader to have used nuclear weapons in war. He desegregated the U.S. Armed Forces, supported a newly independent Israel and was a founder of the United Nations. Truman was born in Lamar, Missouri, and spent most of his youth on his family's 550-acre (220 ha) farm near Independence. In the last months of World War I, he served in combat in France as an artillery officer with his National Guard unit. After the war, he briefly owned a haberdashery in Kansas City, Missouri, and joined the Democratic Party and the political machine of Tom Pendergast. Truman was first elected to public office as a county official in 1922, and then as a U.S. Senator in 1934. He gained national prominence as chairman of the Truman Committee, formed in March 1941, which aimed to find and correct waste and inefficiency in Federal Government wartime contracts. After serving as a United States Senator from Missouri (1935–1945) and briefly as Vice President (1945), he succeeded to the presidency on April 12, 1945, upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Germany surrendered just a few weeks after he assumed the presidency, but the war with Imperial Japan raged on and was expected to last at least another year. Truman approved the use of atomic bombs to end the fighting and to spare the U.S. and Japanese lives that would inevitably be lost in the planned invasion of Japan and Japanese-held islands in the Pacific. This decision and the numerous resulting issues remain the subject of debate to this day. Critics argue that the nuclear bombings were unnecessary since conventional methods could have achieved surrender, while defenders assert that it ultimately saved more lives that would have been lost during an invasion. Truman presided over an unexpected surge in economic prosperity as the U.S. sought readjustment after long years of depression and war. His presidency was a turning point in foreign affairs as the United States engaged in an internationalist foreign policy and renounced isolationism. Truman helped found the United Nations in 1945, issued the Truman Doctrine in 1947 to contain Communism and got the $13 billion Marshall Plan enacted to rebuild Western Europe. His political coalition was based on the white South, labor unions, farmers, ethnic groups and traditional Democrats across the North. Truman was able to rally these groups of supporters during the 1948 presidential election and win a surprise victory that secured a presidential term in his own right. The Soviet Union, then led by Joseph Stalin, became an enemy in the Cold War. Truman oversaw the Berlin Airlift of 1948 and the creation of NATO in 1949, but was unable to stop Communists from taking over China in 1949. In 1950, he survived unharmed from an assassination attempt. When Communist North Korea invaded South Korea in 1950, he sent U.S. troops and gained UN approval for the Korean War. After initial successes in Korea, the UN forces were thrown back by Chinese intervention and the con ...
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
Victorian era | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Victorian era Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque era of Continental Europe. In terms of moral sensibilities and political reforms, this period began with the passage of the Reform Act 1832. There was a strong religious drive for higher moral standards led by the nonconformist churches, such as the Methodist, and the Evangelical wing of the established Church of England. Britain had relatively peaceful relations with the other Great Powers, excepting during the Crimean War; the Pax Britannica was maintained by the country's naval supremacy and industrial supremacy. Britain embarked on global imperial expansion, particularly in Asia and Africa, which made the British Empire the largest empire in history. National self-confidence peaked.Ideologically, the Victorian era witnessed resistance to the rationalism that defined the Georgian period and an increasing turn towards romanticism and even mysticism with regard to religion, social values, and arts.Domestically, the political agenda was increasingly liberal, with a number of shifts in the direction of gradual political reform, industrial reform, and the widening of the franchise. There were unprecedented demographic changes: the population of England and Wales almost doubled from 16.8 million in 1851 to 30.5 million in 1901, and Scotland's population also rose rapidly, from 2.8 million in 1851 to 4.4 million in 1901. However, Ireland's population decreased sharply, from 8.2 million in 1841 to less than 4.5 million in 1901, mostly due to emigration and the Great Famine. Between 1837 and 1901 about 15 million emigrated from Great Britain, mostly to the United States, Canada, South Africa, New Zealand, and Australia.The two main political parties during the era remained the Whigs/Liberals and the Conservatives; by its end, the Labour Party had formed as a distinct political entity. These parties were led by such prominent statesmen as Lord Melbourne, Sir Robert Peel, Lord Derby, Lord Palmerston, Benjamin Disraeli, William Gladstone, and Lord Salisbury. The unsolved problems relating to Irish Home Rule played a great part in politics in the later Victorian era, particularly in view of Gladstone's determination to achieve a political settlement in Ireland.
Views: 16 wikipedia tts
Suspense: Lonely Road / Out of Control / Post Mortem
 
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The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 90824 Remember This
espyconnect NDIS Support Item modification 2017
 
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we have made some changes to our NDIS Support Items category. Watch our video to see how easy it is to update your listing!
Views: 7470 Espy Connect
The Design Competition Conference – Design Competitions Now and Opening Remarks
 
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Opening Remarks: Introducing the key themes and questions for the day’s discussions, this opening session looks at how competitions can inspire such wildly different opinions — including those from over 1,400 designers who responded to a recent survey — and what they indicate about the state of contemporary design practice. Framing Design Competitions Jerold S. Kayden | Frank Backus Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design The Architectural Record/Van Alen Institute Design Competition Survey: Findings David van der Leer | Executive Director, Van Alen Institute Design Competitions Now: Designers, government officials, community advocates, and critics discuss four recent design competitions that have tested the boundaries of what competitions can be and what it means for design, planning, and the public interest. Case Study I: Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition Marshall Brown | Associate Professor, Illinois Institute of Technology, School of Architecture Cara Cragan | Studio Leader, Rockwell Group Case Study II: Rebuild by Design Scott Davis | Senior Advisor, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Gena Wirth | Principal, SCAPE Moderator Reed Kroloff | Principal, jones | kroloff
Views: 1198 Harvard GSD
Things Mr. Welch is No Longer Allowed to do in a RPG #1-2450 Reading Compilation
 
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A list of things that Mister Welch is no long allowed to do in a tabletop rpg game. From Dungeons and dragons, call of cthulu, Pathfinder, Star Wars, and many other tabletop games and modules! 2450 entries in all! If you wish to see more from Eastside Show SCP (Eastside Steve), be sure to subscribe today for the latest videos! https://goo.gl/KekHSK The complete reading compilation of "Things Mr. Welch is No Longer Allowed to do in a RPG" numbers 1-2540! Enjoy the insanity, featuring RPG loop holes, insanity, and all sorts of table top shenanigans! Read along with me! ♣Read along: http://theglen.livejournal.com/389635.html TVtropes page: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Blog/ThingsMrWelchIsNoLongerAllowedToDoInAnRPG "Pixel Peeker Polka - slower" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 150667 The Eastside Show
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 189816 Shari Wing
Political Figures, Lawyers, Politicians, Journalists, Social Activists (1950s Interviews)
 
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Interviewees: Harold Himmel Velde, United States political figure Hugh D. Scott, Jr., American lawyer and politician John V. Beamer, U.S. Representative from Indiana Orland K. Armstrong, Republican United States Representative, journalist, and social activist Edward L.R. Elson, Presbyterian minister and Chaplain of the United States Senate Richard Russell, Jr., American politician from Georgia Richard Brevard Russell, Jr. (November 2, 1897 -- January 21, 1971) was an American politician from Georgia. A member of the Democratic Party, he briefly served as Governor of Georgia (1931--33) before serving in the United States Senate for almost 40 years, from 1933 until his death in 1971. As a Senator, he was a candidate for President of the United States in the 1952 Democratic National Convention, coming in second to Adlai Stevenson. Russell was a founder and leader of the conservative coalition that dominated Congress from 1937 to 1963, and at his death was the most senior member of the Senate. He was for decades a leader of Southern opposition to the civil rights movement. Russell competed in the 1952 Democratic presidential primary, but was shut-out of serious consideration by northern Democratic leaders who saw his support for segregation as untenable outside of the Jim Crow South. When Lyndon Johnson arrived in the Senate, he sought guidance from knowledgeable senate aide Bobby Baker, who advised that all senators were "equal" but Russell was the most "equal"—meaning the most powerful. Johnson assiduously cultivated Russell through all of their joint Senate years and beyond. Russell's support for first-term senator Lyndon Johnson paved the way for Johnson to become Senate Majority Leader. Russell often dined at Johnson's house during their Senate days. However, their 20-year friendship came to an end during Johnson's presidency, in a fight over the Chief Justice nomination of Johnson's friend and Supreme Court justice Abe Fortas in 1968. While a prime mentor of Johnson, Russell and the then-president Johnson also disagreed over civil rights. Russell, a segregationist, had repeatedly blocked and defeated civil rights legislation via use of the filibuster and had co-authored the Southern Manifesto in opposition to civil rights. He had not supported the States Rights' Democratic Party of Strom Thurmond in 1948, but he opposed civil rights laws as unconstitutional and unwise. (Unlike Theodore Bilbo, "Cotton Ed" Smith and James Eastland, who had reputations as ruthless, tough-talking, heavy-handed race baiters, he never justified hatred or acts of violence to defend segregation. But he strongly defended white supremacy and apparently did not question it or ever apologize for his segregationist views, votes and speeches.) Russell was key, for decades, in blocking meaningful civil rights legislation that might have protected African-Americans from lynching, disenfranchisement, and disparate treatment under the law. After Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Russell (along with more than a dozen other southern Senators, including Herman Talmadge and Russell Long) boycotted the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City. A prominent supporter of a strong national defense, Russell became in the 1950s the most knowledgeable and powerful congressional leader in this area. He used his powers as chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee from 1951 to 1969 and then as chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee as an institutional base to add defense installations and jobs for Georgia. He was dubious about the Vietnam War, privately warning President Johnson repeatedly against deeper involvement. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Russell,_Jr.
Views: 58951 The Film Archives

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