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Situation Critical - S01E12 - Coal Mine Disaster
 
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At the Quecreek Mine in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, coal miners accidentally dug into the poorly documented Saxman Mine, causing 500 million tonnes of underground water to flood the Quecreek mine. All nine miners trapped by the water were eventually rescued.
Views: 466902 GFS Valhalla
Sago Mine Disaster
 
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Thirteen men sat in the best barricade they could build, enduring...hoping. They had used their single hour of oxygen from the only Self Contained Self Rescuer issued to them by the company. Their families waited outside living through one of the most difficult times of their lives, praying to see their loved ones once again. As time wore on, we would learn the ultimate fate of those men, those husbands, those fathers, those grandfathers, brothers, uncles, nephews. One was alive, barely holding on…the others had perished in the thick poisoned air of the mine. The miners of Sago were like so many of us. They took one of the few jobs available to them, jobs that would allow them to live in the places they had long called home, jobs that would pay enough to support their families. If only the company had given them more than one SCSR—if only there had been a law—but we know how much power money holds over the hearts of men. It would be the suffering and tragic loss of life of those 12 brave souls—the pain of constant loss felt by their families—that would finally see to it that every coal miner in the United States would never face the same crisis. Millions of Americans became outraged at the events that played out on their televisions, and the ensuing public outcry would accomplish a feat that has seldom been accomplished in the history of US coal mining—the power of coal industry lobbyists was outweighed by the voice of the public in the halls of government. Laws were passed and now additional SCSRs must be purchased by coal companies, underground safe havens must be built and supply miners with three day of oxygen, food, and water. Each time my crew passed a safe haven and SCSR stash on our way to the section, I would think of those men, I would think of their final hours. I would pay my respects to them in my own way and wish that the corruption of the coalfields had not taken their lives. I hope that other miners do the same and remember the day the miners of Sago perished and the hearts of their families were forever broken. May you all rest in peace. God Bless.
Views: 141459 Nick Mullins
12 Dead, 10 Missing in W.V. Coal Mine Explosion
 
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An explosion rocked a remote West Virginia coal mine with a history of safety problems, killing 12 workers and trapping at least 10 others thousands of feet underground in the worst U.S. mine disaster since 2006. (April 5)
Views: 19534 Associated Press
Springhill Mining Disaster
 
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Support BDHQ http://www.patreon.com/baddayhq The 1958 bump, which occurred on October 23, 1958, was the most severe "bump" (underground earthquake) in North American mining history. The 1958 bump devastated the people of Springhill for the casualties they suffered; it also devastated the town, as the coal industry had been its economic lifeblood. After five and a half days (therefore around the morning of Wednesday, October 29, 1958), contact was established with a group of 12 survivors on the other side of a 160-foot (49 m) rockfall. A rescue tunnel was dug; it broke through to the trapped miners at 2:25 am on Thursday, October 30, 1958. Having a bad day? I bet we have worse ones for you. Sound off in the comments on your thoughts and what you'd like to see next! SUBSCRIBE today to get the latest true crime and disaster documentaries delivered to you weekly! All content is copyright of Partners in Motion INC. Join us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/partnersinmotion/?view_public_for=1003857803032519 https://twitter.com/PartnersHarmony https://plus.google.com/u/0/109232389902601257458 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Want to survive a real disaster or enhance a camping trip? Support Bad Day HQ by ordering some of our personally selected products: Best selling SAS Survival guide: https://goo.gl/IUms75 72-Hour emergency survival kit: https://goo.gl/FLkEOh LifeStraw portable water filter: https://goo.gl/hzBOz0 BioLite dual wood burning stove and USB charger: https://goo.gl/X8mDXK
Views: 31347 Bad Day HQ
Coal Mining: The Disasters and the History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation
 
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A public domain video A film about the history of underground coal mining throughout the years. The disasters and the health regulations. -The Monongah Mining Disaster was the worst mining accident in American history; 362 men and young boys were killed in an underground explosion on December 6, 1907 in Monongah, West Virginia. -Following a decade in which the number of coal mining fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau Of Mines in 1910 as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was to investigate accidents, advise industry, conduct production and safety research, and teach courses in accident prevention, first aid, and mine rescue. However, Congress did not empower the federal inspectors to enter and inspect mines until 1941, and did not authorize a code of federal regulations for mine safety until 1947. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Acts of 1969 and 1977 set greater safety standards for the industry. Where annual mining deaths had numbered more than 1,000 a year in the early part of the 20th century, they decreased to an average of about 500 in the late 1950s. Subscribe - never miss a video! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_S8ZlDCRkMMgc7ciw8X-hg The 20th Century Time Machine takes you back in time to the most important historical events of the past century. Watch documentaries, discussions and real footage of major events that shaped the world we live in today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHAZA5h5cmo
Views: 1366 npatou
World's biggest mine: Inside US coal
 
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Barack Obama’s pledge to cut carbon emissions has not stopped North Antelope Rochelle mine in Wyoming. In fact, production is booming - and climate change is off the agenda. The Guardian's Suzanne Goldenberg gets a rare look inside the biggest coal mine in the world. Subscribe to The Guardian ► http://bit.ly/subscribegdn Get the whole picture ► http://bit.ly/guardianhome ENDBOARD VIDEOS The godless church and the atheists taking the US by storm ► http://bit.ly/GodlessChurch US Democracy doesn't work in this slice of Florida ► http://bit.ly/1EuRyMz GUARDIAN PLAYLISTS Guardian Investigations ► http://bit.ly/gdninvestigations Comment is Free ► http://bit.ly/CIFplaylist Guardian Docs ► http://bit.ly/gdndocs Guardian Animations & Explanations ► http://bit.ly/aninandex Other Guardian channels on YouTube: Guardian Football ► https://www.youtube.com/user/guardianfootball Guardian Music ► https://www.youtube.com/guardianmusic Guardian Membership ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianMembership Guardian Food ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianFood Guardian Culture ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianCultureArts Guardian Tech ► THE GUARDIAN'S TOP 10 VIDEOS Mos Def force fed in Gitmo procedure ► http://bit.ly/1hdvoqM Bangladeshi Sex Workers take steroids ► http://bit.ly/1mqf3fA North Korean military parade in slow-mo ► http://bit.ly/TTEAGk Police assault on Ian Tomlinson at G20 ► http://bit.ly/1rgq6Pg Manny Pacquiao fight highlights ► http://bit.ly/RBczBp Brick-by-brick women's fencing protest ► http://bit.ly/RBcEFc Trouserless on the Tube ► http://bit.ly/SPWOrv Jesus "would have been an atheist" ► http://bit.ly/1kfrKqP Open Heart Surgery ► http://bit.ly/1tPaGQ2 Brick-by-Brick Usain Bolt 2012 Olympic gold ► http://bit.ly/1pxQqQv
Views: 189182 The Guardian
West Virginia Mining Disaster - SURVIVORS
 
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Support BDHQ http://www.patreon.com/baddayhq The Farmington Mine disaster was an explosion that happened at approximately 5:30 a.m. on November 20, 1968, at the Consol No. 9 coal mine north of Farmington and Mannington, West Virginia, United States. The explosion was large enough to be felt in Fairmont, almost 12 miles away. At the time, 99 miners were inside. Over the course of the next few hours, 21 miners were able to escape the mine, but 78 were still trapped. All who were unable to escape perished; the bodies of 19 of the dead were never recovered. The cause of the explosion was never determined, but the accident served as the catalyst for several new laws that were passed to protect miners. Having a bad day? I bet we have worse ones for you. Sound off in the comments on your thoughts and what you'd like to see next! SUBSCRIBE today to get the latest true crime and disaster documentaries delivered to you weekly! All content is copyright of Partners in Motion INC. Join us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/partnersinmotion/?view_public_for=1003857803032519 https://twitter.com/PartnersHarmony https://plus.google.com/u/0/109232389902601257458 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Want to survive a real disaster or enhance a camping trip? Support Bad Day HQ by ordering some of our personally selected products: Best selling SAS Survival guide: https://goo.gl/IUms75 72-Hour emergency survival kit: https://goo.gl/FLkEOh LifeStraw portable water filter: https://goo.gl/hzBOz0 BioLite dual wood burning stove and USB charger: https://goo.gl/X8mDXK
Views: 12541 Bad Day HQ
knox mine disaster location and footage
 
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Please like & subscribe to JP Videos This video shows the location of the knox mine disaster and shows how it looks today as well as footage from 1959. enjoy Don't forget to like my page https://www.facebook.com/JPVideos81 At approximately 11:20 a.m., two laborers in the Pittston vein heard a sharp “popping” sound. They quickly called upon John Williams, the assistant foreman. The three employees hurried to escape and notify superintendent Robert Groves, who immediately ordered an evacuation, although he withheld the severity of the situation. Unfortunately, the other three men who were stationed in this vein could not escape in time and the fierce waters of the Susquehanna took their lives. While millions of gallons of water flooded into the mine, thirty-three men managed to catch the last elevators at the May shaft, but forty-five others remained trapped, desperately seeking their own outlet. During the first sixty four hours of the emergency, an estimated 2.7 million gallons of water per minute streamed underground from an enormous whirlpool near the riverbank. Down below, thirty-two men wandered in two separate groups until they managed to escape through the abandoned Eagle air shaft. Pennsylvania Coal Company surveyor, Joe Stella, led the first group of seven. He not only knew the mines well, but also possessed maps which allowed his group to find a direct course to the opening. The second group, led by Myron Thomas, consisted of twenty-five men who wandered for hours before they found their way to safety. Unfortunately, twelve of the original remaining bodies have never been recovered. Thousands of bails of hay and hundreds of railroad ties were also added. Culm, dirt, and rock along with over 50 coal and railroad cars barely stopped the river. Finally they diverted the river around Wintermoot Island by building dams at both ends of the island. Once they pumped the water out between the dams the size of the hole was evident. Tons of clay and rock were poured into the hole and a concrete cap was placed on top of the opening. They then pumped much of the water out of the mine to look for the 12 missing miners. How could this tragedy have happened? The original plan was to keep 50 feet of rock and coal between the workings and the river bottom. The Knox company wanted this to be lowered to 35 feet. Mine inspectors deemed this ok as it would be sufficient to stand up to the river. At this point the seam of coal sloped up towards the river in what is known as an anticline. Company owners kept pushing the miners closer and closer to the river bottom until the rock could no longer support the river. At the point where the river broke through the rock was only 5 to 6 feet thick! This disaster ended deep mining in the Wyoming valley as almost all of the coal company’s mines connected.
Views: 69085 JPVideos
Underground Miners fired for doing the Harlem Shake!!
 
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15 Western Australian underground mine workers at the Agnew Gold Mine do the Harlem shake, all the miners involved in this incident were fired. Some of the fired workers were bystanders who did not actually appear in the video.
Views: 752292 Sean G
Farmington Coal Mine Explosion West Virginia November 1968 MSHA
 
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At approximately 5:30 a.m. on Wednesday, November 20, 1968, an explosion occurred in the Consol No.9 Mine, Mountaineer Coal Company, Division of Consolidation Coal Company, Farmington, Marion County, West Virginia. There were 99 miners in the mine when the explosion occurred, 78 of whom died as a result of the explosion. The other 21 miners survived the explosion and escaped to the surface. The mine was sealed at its surface openings on November 30, 1968. Damage to the mine in the explosion area was extensive, requiring loading of rock falls, replacement of ventilation and transportation facilities, and in some cases new mine entries to bypass extensively caved areas. Investigative activities were continued, in cooperation with the Company, State, and United Mine Workers of America (UMW A) organizations, as mine areas were recovered. Between 1969 and 1978, the bodies of 59 victims were recovered and brought to the surface. Recovery operations ceased and all entrances to the mine were permanently sealed in November 1978, leaving 19 victims buried in the mine and leaving some areas of the mine unexplored. Lessons learned during early evaluation of this disaster were incorporated into the Federal Coal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1969. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". For more on the history of coal mine safety, go to http://www.msha.gov/AboutMSHA.HTM . This was clipped from the 2004 video, We Are ... MSHA, by the Mine Safety and Health Administration and available at the MSHA website and the Internet Archive.
Views: 32615 markdcatlin
Real Miners, Old Method Underground Coal Mining
 
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Here is the real miners working without technology. Real Miners, Old Method Underground Coal Mining from Turkey. This video is taken in 1986.
Views: 26898 mining videos
coal mine roof fall afrter pillaring
 
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this is what happens after the pillars have been removed. A normal day at work for a coal miner .
Views: 34309 81971slm
Buried Alive - Chile Mine Rescue
 
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Subscribe to Naked Science - http://goo.gl/wpc2Q1 Every other Wednesday we present a new video, so join us to see the truth laid bare... On 5th August 2010, all 33 of the day shift miners at the San Jose mine in Chile were missing and feared killed when their copper and gold mine collapsed. For 17 days no one knew whether they were alive or dead. Miraculously, after all hope was lost, on the 17th day the specialist drilling rigs looking for signs of life smashed through into the tunnel where the men had been clinging on. All 33 of the men were alive and well. Buried Alive: The Chilean Mine Rescue was given unprecedented access to the drilling rigs, engineers and medics for the definitive story of how this audacious rescue was carried out. The film follows the extraordinary story of the 33 miners, trapped underground for 70 days. Above ground, the film makers had unique access to document the highs and lows of the drilling teams as they pounded their way through almost half a mile of granite. Below ground the programme follows how the miners survived for so long and hears first hand from the doctors and psychologists who were keeping them alive and sane, giving extraordinary insight into the underground hell they had to endure. The rescue of all 33 Chilean miners has been an extraordinary feat of ingenuity and daring. This factual documentary explains in detail the challenges they faced and the technology they used to overcome all odds. Buried Alive: The Chilean Mine Rescue gains unique access to the key players involved to tell the story of the tireless, tough and emotional effort that went on at the San Jose Mine, away from the glare of the news cameras
Views: 165543 Naked Science
Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5
 
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Scotia Mine Explosion 1976 Part 1 of 5 Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of southeastern Kentucky in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, it brought both positives and negatives. On the one hand, mining operations brought a steady paycheck to those who had largely lived by the alternating fortunes of farming. Conversely, the mines brought a sense of employment dependence and often unsafe working conditions. By the mid-1900s, mining safety had improved drastically from just a few years before. Battery powered lamps had replaced carbide lanterns and continuous automated mining equipment had taken over for the pick and shovel and draft animals. But, due to the nature of the work, accidents still injured miners. The Scotia Mine began operations in 1962 and was a subsidiary of the Blue Diamond Coal Company. It was located in the Ovenfork Community of Letcher County, about fourteen miles northeast of the town of Cumberland (Harlan County, Kentucky). On March 9, 1976, at approximately 11:45 a.m., an explosion caused by coal dust and gasses rocked the Scotia mine. Two days later, a second explosion happened. The first explosion killed fifteen miners; the second killed eleven. Investigators believed that the explosions were caused by methane gasses that were ignited by a spark caused by a battery-powered locomotive or another electric device. A lack of ventilation figured prominently in the accidents. The explosions at Scotia led to the passage of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. This law strengthened the previously passed 1969 act, which, at the time, had been the most significant legislation on mine safety ever adopted in the U.S. The 1977 law also moved the Mine Safety and Health Administration from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Labor.
Views: 6319 Jo
Turkey coal mine blast: transformer explodes underground, kills more than 200
 
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More than 200 coal miners are dead and dozens more remain trapped deep underground in Turkey following an explosion and fire inside a mine shaft between 1 to 2 kilometers deep. The explosion was reportedly caused by an electrical fault inside a transformer and is believed to have caused a fire inside the mine shaft. According to the BBC, the blast also triggered a power cut, which made the lifts unusable, leaving hundreds of miners stranded underground. To assist any miners still trapped while rescue efforts are undergoing, CNN reported that officials have turned an outlet pipe into a clean air pipe to allow fresh air to enter places where there is no fire. Thirty workers have been rescued so far but as many as 400 workers may still be underground. According to local newspaper Today's Zaman, mining accidents are common in Turkey, which is plagued by poor safety conditions. The country's worst mining disaster was in 1992, the BBC reported, when 270 miners were killed near Zonguldak on the Black Sea.
Views: 6458 News Direct
Coal Mine Floods | National Geographic
 
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The Quecreek Coal mine in Pennsylvania is flooded when miners accidentally break through to an abandoned mine. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Coal Mine Floods | National Geographic https://youtu.be/0zEXYyAVZU8 National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 98648 National Geographic
America's Worst Mining Disasters
 
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Coal Mining
Views: 9943 Gail Taylor
Coal mining in America's heartland | DW Documentary
 
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West Virginia, USA - under its wild mountain idyll hides the "black hell": A labyrinth of dark tunnels - hard life in a coal mine. [Online until: 15 August 2019] "Wild, wonderful West Virginia” - that’s how the small state nestled in the Appalachian Mountains bills itself. This documentary reports on the daily struggle facing local coal miners hoping for help from Donald Trump; a sheriff combating the opioid epidemic that has already claimed thousands of lives; and a Cherokee environmental activist whose efforts have earned her intimidation and threats. The whistle of a locomotive at the front of an old coal train, quiet winding roads, and hardly a highway to be found - that’s still the image that many have of West Virginia today. But beneath the forest-covered mountains lies a labyrinth of tunnels just one meter high, in which miners still spend their entire working days toiling in the dark on their hands and knees. The camera team accompanies a traditional coal mining family as they go about their day. Together with the family’s two sons, Scott and Steven Lockhart, the crew ventures into the mine. Conversations with the miners reveal why people who had been lifelong Democratic Party supporters are suddenly placing their hopes for the future in Donald Trump. But the documentary also ventures beyond the coal mines to uncover the lesser-known sides of this Appalachian state - from snake-handling Pentecostal churches to the bluegrass and mountain ballads of Alan Cathead Johnston. We also speak with Sheriff Martin West, who sued the country’s three biggest pharmaceutical makers for their role in the opioid epidemic that has swept the region. And we meet another person who has decided to fight back: Maria Gunnoe, a young Cherokee activist who has dared to take on the coal barons that are ravaging the beautiful mountains of West Virginia. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 161128 DW Documentary
Upper Big Branch Mine Disaster Simulation
 
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Video released by the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration, Dec. 6, 2011.
Views: 185835 kenwardjrwv
Accident at Mamiao Coal Mine, Sichuan, China
 
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A small coal mine with a 600mm narrow gauge railway at work near Mamiao in Sichuan Province, China in 2009. A 'health and safety' nightmare... A reminder, posting abusive comments as has happened here will see them removed immediately. Think before you submit.please.
Views: 422960 Rob Dickinson
A Hidden America: Coal Mining
 
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Section of 20/20 Documentary. I do not own the rights to this video.
Views: 37537 Damien Dickman
China's Dangerous Mines
 
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Experts say China's mining industry is among the deadliest in the world. And the successful rescue of the trapped Chilean miners should prompt Chinese authorities to looks at their country's own mining industry. As news of the successful rescue of 33 Chilean miners spread around the world, experts say China could learn valuable lessons from Chile's approach as it is home to the worlds' deadliest mining industry. One source says the news media in China does not report on all the mine disasters that occur. [Prof. Hu Xingdou, Beijing Institute of Technology]: "I think that first the information has to be open and transparent. The situation in the Chilean mine was, from the start, broadcast to the world. In the past in China, as soon as a disaster occurred, information was blocked from the media." China is frequently hit by mine disasters, mostly in coalmines, which killed more than 2,000 people last year. Authorities have failed to impose safety regulations on its mines. [Prof. Hu Xingdou, Beijing Institute of Technology]: "Perhaps we have a few places where the government bureau and the supervisory office illegally neglect their duty, some government leaders also hold shares in coal mines so they turn a blind eye to illegal operations." And the focus has been on making profit, and not so much on the welfare of the coal miners. [Prof. Hu Xingdou, Beijing Institute of Technology]: "Our leaders still attach little importance to mine disasters. In their hearts there is no feeling that you must put people first and prioritize the person's life, they still do not think that way. They place the most importance on increasing GDP, increasing the economy and growth." Coalmining is extremely dangerous because of the likely presence of methane, a toxic gas that can be explosive, depending on the concentration. China is the world's largest coal producer and consumer.
Views: 32125 NTDTV
More than 50 workers die in Coal mine collapse in Godda, Jharkhand
 
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At least 50 miners got buried under tons of rubble in a coal mine collapse at the Lalmatia open-cast coalfields owned by Eastern Coalfields Limited (ECL) in Godda. Rescuers dug out 12 bodies even as other miners remained trapped under the debris. Officials said all those who have been found dead so far were contractual workers. The miners were hired by Mahalaxmi Engineering Company, a Gujarat-based company sub-leased to carry out excavation of coal mines. The Lalmatia coal mine, which became operational in 1981, comes under the ECL's Rajmahal project. The officials said efforts were on to identify the dead and trapped miners. They added that most of the miners belonged to Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh. Jharkhand chief secretary Rajbala Verma and DGP DK Pandey rushed to the site as soon as news of the mine collapse reached the state capital. Verma said, "We will not spare anyone found guilty of negligence." Following Verma's directives, an FIR was filed against the company that had hired the miners. Source: timesofindia.indiatimes.com/ This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The collection comprises of 150, 000+ hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM / SR 1080i High Definition, Alexa, SR, XDCAM and 4K. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Please subscribe to our channel wildfilmsindia on Youtube for a steady stream of videos from across India. Also, visit and enjoy your journey across India at www.clipahoy.com , India's first video-based social networking experience! Reach us at rupindang [at] gmail [dot] com and [email protected] To SUBSCRIBE click the below link: www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=WildFilmsIndia Like & Follow Us on: Facebook: www.facebook.com/WildernessFilmsIndiaLimited Website: www.wildfilmsindia.com
Views: 3954 WildFilmsIndia
MINING SAFETY FILM  COAL MINE SHUTTLE CAR OPERATOR  45734
 
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“The Shuttle Car Operator” is 1960s-era color film taking the viewer deep inside a bituminous coal mine to learn more about the coal-mining industry. The camera takes us into cramped spaces as drills make their way through the earth (mark 01:15) and coal hauled away on trolleys called shuttle cars. But the job of a shuttle car operator is one of the most dangerous in the coal mining industry, we’re told at mark 02:10, with one out of every seven transportation injuries involving shuttle car operators. To ensure safety the film discusses the importance of proper car maintenance and proper training of employees. Numerous scenes of shuttle cars in the bowels of the earth follow as the narrator continuously reminds the viewer of the importance of being vigilent and on the lookout for any physical hazards that may impede movement. Starting at mark 04:45 the film reminds of the viewer of those men who “paid with their lives” as crews are shown at work including checking ventilation shafts and removing hazards — though “failure to think about safety” leads to a (staged) fatality at mark 07:55. Other accidents follow, the result of workers too engaged in conversation and oblivious to changes in their underground environment, or those inadequately trained. If an operator is trained and alert, we’re told at mark 15:50, such tragedy can be averted. First introduced in the 1930s, shuttle cars are batch haulage vehicles in the underground mining industry. Shuttle cars are designed to work as a system with continuous miners, efficiently removing cut material from the working face and maximizing the productivity of the entire section. Heavy-duty, high-power drive trains enable our shuttle cars to haul heavy loads in the most difficult conditions. Traction motors power the permanent four-wheel drive system. The cast pivot axles are virtually indestructible, while the heavy-duty conveyors and abrasion-resistant conveyor decking improve reliability and durability. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 6351 PeriscopeFilm
The First Chilean Miner Is Rescued
 
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Florencio Avalos, the first Chilean miner steps from the rescue capsule. More PBS NewsHour coverage here: http://to.pbs.org/9Inki5
Views: 713475 PBS NewsHour
Eastern Kentucky Coal Mines
 
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Coal Mines of Eastern Kentucky by Tayler Fleming.
Views: 47725 Tayler Fleming
Turkey Soma coal mine blast: At least 274 miners confirmed dead, hundreds trapped inside
 
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The death toll in the accident at a coal mine in Soma, Turkey has reached at least 274, making the disaster the worst in the country's history. Eighty more miners are injured while hundreds are still trapped deep underground. The miners have been trapped since Wednesday, following an explosion and fire in a mine shaft between 1 to 2 kilometres deep. CNN reports that the explosion was caused by an electrical fault inside a transformer and is believed to have caused a fire inside the mine shaft. The BBC says the blast triggered a power outage, which made the lifts unusable, leaving hundreds of miners stranded underground. Most of the deaths are believed to have been caused by suffocation, and there is little hope for the miners still trapped inside. To help them officials have turned an outlet pipe into a clean air pipe to allow fresh air to enter in places where there is no fire, CNN reported. But although oxygen is being pumped into the shaft, rescue efforts have been repeatedly suspended due to high levels of carbon monoxide. Nearly 450 miners have been rescued. As many as 200 are still missing, according to Voice of America. Turkish newspaper Today's Zaman says that mining accidents are common in Turkey, which is plagued by poor safety conditions. In 1992, in what was considered until now the worst mining disaster, 270 miners were killed near Zonguldak on the Black Sea. The International Labor Organization ranked Turkey the third worst in the world for worker deaths in 2012, according to Voice of America.
Views: 2502 News Direct
Accidents in Pa. coal mines through the years
 
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Coal mining accidents in Pennsylvania have killed hundreds of miners. One in Westmoreland County in 1907 killed 239 miners. (Video by Deb Kiner/PennLive)
Views: 288 PennLive.com
Coal mine accident: six die after gas leak in Spain
 
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Sign up for a free trial of News Direct's animated news graphics at http://newsdirect.nma.com.tw/Reuters.aspx Six miners died while working in a coal mine in Spain on Monday due to a sudden gas leak. According to El Pais, the accident took place in northern Spain's Leon region in a gallery 694 metres below ground, where 11 miners were working. The tunnel measured four metres high and five metres wide. The leak of firedamp, a silent and odorless gas, happened around 1:30 p.m. when there were at least 150 workers inside the whole mine who started their morning shift at 7:45 a.m. and were supposed to finish work at 3:15 p.m. Firedamp is a flammable gas commonly found in coal mines and that accumulate in pockets in the coal. The leak happened quickly, and didn't produce any explosion. The workers closest to the source of the leak didn't have time to escape or put on their protective masks. They were overcome by the fumes, dying inside the mine. "The fire brigade went in but there is less than one percent of oxygen in the area where the gas leak occurred so no-one can stay there until it is completely ventilated," UGT union official José Antonio Colinas told reporters. Five workers were evacuated and then transferred to Leon's hospital, the regional capital. According to reports, one of them, is fighting for his life. It is still unknown why the gas detectors didn't send the alarm. The mine is operated by financially troubled Hullera Vasco-Leonesa. Four years ago, seven people were intoxicated in the same mine due to a firedamp escape. However, the company managed to extract the workers while still alive. Monday's gas leak is Spain's deadliest mining accident since 1995.
Views: 3437 News Direct
Digging for Hope: Inside an Ohio coal mine
 
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Matt Beaver and other miners describe their difficult working conditions and how they hope President Donald Trump can save their struggling industry. They work at the Vail Mine, owned by the Redbud Mining Company, in Freeport, Ohio.
Views: 437061 TheColumbusDispatch
Kellingley Colliery: Britain's last coal mine closes
 
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A million men used to toil beneath the ground. Coal-mining fuelled the industrial revolution and brought about the biggest industrial dispute of the last fifty years. Now Britain's last deep coal mine, Kellingley Colliery in Yorkshire, has closed. Subscribe for more like this, every day: http://bit.ly/1epe41j Dangerous world: http://bit.ly/1JCsSYb The news explained: http://bit.ly/1epgay4 Music: http://bit.ly/1RVTRNy Technology: http://bit.ly/1LI1K9y Like us on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1wQ1Gty Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1mFUjBD
Views: 24750 Channel 4 News
China Mining Accident Traps Five Coalminers Underground
 
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Five people remained trapped underground on Thursday after a coal mine was flooded in central China's Hubei Province, according to local authorities. The accident occurred on Tuesday at the Wanchanggou Coal Mine in Hubei's Jingmen City, where 36 miners were working underground, says district deputy head, Zhou Wenbing. Thirty-one miners managed to escape safely, but the remaining five workers were trapped by flooding in the shaft, possibly caused by a mining blast. Zhou says rescue work is underway and one of the tunnels in the mine is expected to be unblocked on Thursday. An expert who is directing the mine rescue, Hu Jixiong, says their plan A is to reach the trapped workers through the ventilation system, and they have reached around 100 yards from them. Plan B is to make use of the transmission zone but collapsed tunnels are hampering the operation. For more news and videos visit ☛ http://ntdtv.org Follow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevision Add us on Facebook ☛ http://on.fb.me/s5KV2C
Views: 875 NTDTV
BBC1 News - UK Coal mining
 
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Views: 46729 UK Coal
Hazards Around Bins And Hoppers 1978 Mine Safety & Health Administration
 
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more at http://quickfound.net "Emphasizes the safety of those who must work around bins and hoppers and acquaints them with the potential hazards of entering these and other material storage areas. Encourages workers to follow the safe and correct operating procedures that apply to their jobs." Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining#Safety Safety has long been a concern in the mining business especially in sub-surface mining. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, involved the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France on March 10, 1906. This disaster was surpassed only by the Benxihu Colliery accident in China on April 26, 1942, which killed 1,549 miners. While mining today is substantially safer than it was in previous decades, mining accidents still occur. Government figures indicate that 5,000 Chinese miners die in accidents each year, while other reports have suggested a figure as high as 20,000. Mining accidents continue worldwide, including accidents causing dozens of fatalities at a time such as the 2007 Ulyanovskaya Mine disaster in Russia, the 2009 Heilongjiang mine explosion in China, and the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster in the United States. Mining ventilation is a significant safety concern for many miners. Poor ventilation inside sub-surface mines causes exposure to harmful gases, heat, and dust, which can cause illness, injury, and death. The concentration of methane and other airborne contaminants underground can generally be controlled by dilution (ventilation), capture before entering the host air stream (methane drainage), or isolation (seals and stoppings). Rock dusts, including coal dust and silicon dust, can cause long-term lung problems including silicosis, asbestosis, and pneumoconiosis (also known as miners lung or black lung disease). A ventilation system is set up to force a stream of air through the working areas of the mine. The air circulation necessary for effective ventilation of a mine is generated by one or more large mine fans, usually located above ground. Air flows in one direction only, making circuits through the mine such that each main work area constantly receives a supply of fresh air. Watering down in coal mines also helps to keep dust levels down: by spraying the machine with water and filtering the dust-laden water with a scrubber fan, miners can successfully trap the dust. Gases in mines can poison the workers or displace the oxygen in the mine, causing asphyxiation... Ignited methane gas is a common source of explosions in coal mines... Miners utilize equipment strong enough to break through extremely hard layers of the Earth's crust. This equipment, combined with the closed work space in which underground miners work, can cause hearing loss... Since mining entails removing dirt and rock from its natural location, thereby creating large empty pits, rooms, and tunnels, cave-ins as well as ground and rock falls are a major concern within mines. Modern techniques for timbering and bracing walls and ceilings within sub-surface mines have reduced the number of fatalities due to cave-ins, but ground falls continue to represent up to 50% of mining fatalities. Even in cases where mine collapses are not instantly fatal, they can trap mine workers deep underground. Cases such as these often lead to high-profile rescue efforts, such as when 33 Chilean miners were trapped deep underground for 69 days in 2010. High temperatures and humidity may result in heat-related illnesses, including heat stroke, which can be fatal. The presence of heavy equipment in confined spaces also poses a risk to miners. To improve the safety of mine workers, modern mines use automation and remote operation including, for example, such equipment as automated loaders and remotely operated rockbreakers. However, despite modern improvements to safety practices, mining remains a dangerous occupation throughout the world...
Views: 4341 Jeff Quitney
Coal Mine Disaster in China
 
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Another coal mining accident in China to tell you about. 17 miners are trapped in an underground mine in the city of Yuzhou in Henan Province. Here's more on the story. For more news and videos visit ☛ http://ntdtv.org Follow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevision Add us on Facebook ☛ http://on.fb.me/s5KV2C On Sunday sixty-two miners were working underground when their pit was flooded with water. 38 miners managed to escape by themselves and another seven were rescued. It is the latest in a string of accidents to plague China -- home to the world's deadliest coal-mining industry. As water was pumped out of the pit, gas fumes also began to rise... making rescue work more difficult and dangerous. A string of explosions at coal mines across the country, in recent days, have killed dozens of Chinese miners and left a number of them missing. China is the world's largest producer and consumer of coal. In 2007 alone, approximately 3,800 Chinese coal miners died in gas blasts, flooding, and other related accidents.
Views: 18582 NTDTV
Underground Coal: Pre-Shift Inspection
 
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Frank Kolarik, a foreman at an underground coal mine discusses the basic practices that are part of an underground foreman's pre-shift exam duties. Don Conrad, Mining Consultant, begins the video by discussing a fatal mine accident that involved pre-shifting. Mike Brnich, NIOSH discusses the importance of quality pre-shift exams. Frank also discusses the principles of mine gases, maintaining ventilation controls and rockdusting as well as making good roof checks and air flow measurements. Jim Pablic, Safety Manager at AMFIRE Mining Co., LLC concludes the video with a story that reinforces the importance of good, quality pre-operational checks. Filmed in 2011 as part of Emergency Prevention Performance: An Education and Training Program for Supervisors.
Views: 7694 Joe Flick
Underground Coal Mining
 
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A view from the drivers seat going into a mine where they use the room & pillar mining technique and another clip showing the longwall mining operation.
Views: 95877 MineralsInYourLife
Monongah 1907 Mine Disaster
 
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This short clip is from Davitt McAteer's 1985 25-minutes video - Monongah 1907. The entire video, rich with detail about this disaster also traces the development of mine safety laws in the US. Monongah 1907 is now available on DVD for $14.95. For ordering information, send an email to: [email protected] . And don't miss Davitt McAteer's book, Monongah: The Tragic Story of the 1907 Monongah Mine Disaster, the Worst Industrial Accident in U.S. History, recently published by the West Virginia University Press (2007) http://www.wvupress.com. "When I heard that Davitt McAteer was working on a book detailing the unparalleled disaster at the Monongah mines, I though it promising news ... no one is positioned better than Davitt MsAteer to examine the Monongah mining disaster of 1907 from all the perspectives required: historical, sociological, legal, and economic. Monongah is an important book, long overdue." From the Introduction by Robert B. Reich, former Secretary of the US Department of Labor, 1993 to 1997. Davitt McAteer, ESQ., a native of West Virginia, has devoted much of his professional efforts to mine health and safety issues. During the 1970s, Davitt led the safety and health programs of the United Mine Workers and founded the Occupational Safety and Health Law Center. During the Clinton Administration, he served as the Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health at the United States Department of Labor. In January of 2006, West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin asked Mr. McAteer to serve as personal advisor and conduct an independent investigation into the cause or causes of the Sago Mine Disaster and the Aracoma Alma No. 1 Mine Fire, both of which occurred in January 2006.
Views: 48630 markdcatlin
McConnell Statement on Kentucky Coal Mining Accident
 
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WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell made the following remarks on the Senate floor Thursday regarding the mining accident in Western Kentucky: Many Kentuckians awoke this morning to the sad news that one miner was killed and another is missing after a ceiling collapse in an underground coal mine in Webster County, which is in the western part of Kentucky. Right now, it is my understanding that MSHA officials are on the site, and rescue teams are working to locate the missing miner. For now, we can only hope that their efforts are successful. I ask my colleagues and the American people to keep the miners, their families, and the rescue workers in their prayers.
Turkey mine accident: 'Clean air pumped underground'
 
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Several miners are reported to have been killed after an explosion and a fire at a coal mine in western Turkey. Up to 300 other workers are believed to be trapped underground at the mine in Soma, Manisa province. Those trapped are about 2km (1.2 miles) below the surface and 4km from the mine's exit. The BBC's James Reynolds said that there was no clear information about the condition of the trapped miners, but that air was being pumped underground to allow them to breathe.
Views: 1421 Today's World News
Pioneering Underground Mining
 
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Joy Mining Machinery releases a new version of its most popular video "Pioneering Underground Mining". You can request a free copy of this video by contacting [email protected] and provide your name and mailing address and if you want the copy in DVD or Blu-ray format. It was first produced in 2001 to support a request by our US Midwest sales region to help a customer explain the difference between room and pillar and longwall mining to finance people. It quickly became the most widely distributed video in our library being used by universities, schools, shown to community groups, etc. The program was updated to show new products and includes all new HD video and animations.
Views: 676370 JoyMiningMachinery
Afghanistan coal mine collapse: 27 killed, at least 13 fear trapped
 
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Originally published on September 15, 2013 At least 27 miners were killed in a collapse in a coal mine in Afghanistan's northern province of Samangan on Saturday evening (September 15). It is believed at least 13 other miners could still be trapped in the mine. The miners were reportedly working in an underground coal mine in Abkhorak coal mine in Ruyi Du Ab district when part of the mine collapsed on them. According to Reuters, "rescue teams have recovered 27 dead miners and there are 22 more wounded," Azizi said. District police chief Akram Behzad said all trapped miners had been rescued. "Afghanistan is estimated to be sitting on as much as $1 trillion in untapped mineral resources but decades of war and instability have kept most investors away. "The government says it expects to make as much as $4 billion a year in mining revenues in the decade from 2014, when most Western forces are due to leave, compared with less than $150 million from its resources sector last year. "The U.S. Pentagon said in a in 2010 briefing paper Afghanistan's main resources were iron ore, with an estimated value of nearly $421 billion, and copper deposits valued at $273 billion. "But insecurity has hampered investment. Lat year, work was halted at China Metallurgical Group's $3 billion Aynak copper mine in the eastern province of Logar following attacks. "Safety standards are also often lax in Afghanistan, with some mines employing children as young as 10 despite government regulations forbidding child labor, the government has said." The collapse is the latest accident to hit Afghanistan's mining industry. It was reported that 11 miners were killed in a similar incident in the northern province of Baghlan last December. -------------------------------------------------------- TomoNews is your daily source for top animated news. We've combined animation and video footage with a snarky personality to bring you the biggest and best stories from around the world. For news that's fun and never boring, visit our channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TomoNewsUS Subscribe to stay updated on all the top stories: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=TomoNewsUS Stay connected with us here: Facebook http://www.facebook.com/TomoNewsUS Twitter @tomonewsus http://www.twitter.com/TomoNewsUS Google+ http://gplus.to/TomoNewsUS -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Crying dog breaks the internet’s heart — but this sad dog story has a happy ending" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4prKTN9bYQc -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 2297 TomoNews US
Harris #1 Coal Mine
 
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The last years of Harris #1 Mine in Boone County, West Virginia.
At least 13 dead in coal mine accident in SW China
 
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Thirteen coal miners have been killed in a coal mine accident in China's southwestern Guizhou Province. The coal and gas explosion happened on Monday night in the Zimujia coal mine in Panzhou City, instantly killing four. Another nine miners were found dead as rescuers concluded a 50-hour search and rescue operation on Wednesday night. Subscribe to us on YouTube: https://goo.gl/lP12gA Download our APP on Apple Store (iOS): https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cctvnews-app/id922456579?l=zh&ls=1&mt=8 Download our APP on Google Play (Android): https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.imib.cctv Follow us on: Website: https://www.cgtn.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChinaGlobalTVNetwork/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cgtn/?hl=zh-cn Twitter: https://twitter.com/CGTNOfficial Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/CGTNOfficial/ Tumblr: http://cctvnews.tumblr.com/ Weibo: http://weibo.com/cctvnewsbeijing
Views: 211 CGTN
Coal Mining in Appalachia
 
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This video is about Coal Mining via Mountain Top Removal. Appalachian Coal Mining See how coal is mined in the Appalachian Mountains via Mountain Top Removal. This 30 minute video takes you inside a giant dragline and tells the whole story from blasting the rock to transporting the coal by rail. See Elk enjoying the reclaimed land. I started this project in 2002.
Views: 245554 Gary Smith
Mine Disasters: "Locating and Rescue of Trapped Miners" 1998 MSHA Mine Safety & Health Admin
 
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Metals playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL64F10A579EB0A526 Geology & Earth Sciences playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A more at http://quickfound.net/ "Mine Safety and Health Administration Locating and Rescue of Trapped Miners... This video describes the equipment and methods used to locate trapped miners in an underground mine environment." Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining_accident A mining accident is an accident that occurs during the process of mining minerals. Thousands of miners die from mining accidents each year, especially in the processes of coal mining and hard rock mining... Causes Mining accidents can have a variety of causes, including leaks of poisonous gases such as hydrogen sulfide or explosive natural gases, especially firedamp or methane, dust explosions, collapsing of mine stopes, mining-induced seismicity, flooding, or general mechanical errors from improperly used or malfunctioning mining equipment (such as safety lamps or electrical equipment). Use of improper explosives underground can also cause methane and coal-dust explosions. Accidents by country Australia New South Wales's Mount Kembla Mine disaster of 31 July 1902 was an explosion resulting in the death of 96 miners... An explosion at the Mount Mulligan mine on 19 September 1921 killed 75 workers... Canada ...The Hillcrest mine disaster, the worst coal mining disaster of Canadian history, occurred in Alberta in 1914... China According to one source, in 2003 China accounted for the largest number of coal-mining fatalities, accounting for about 80% of the world's total, although it produced only 35% of the world's coal. Between January 2001 and October 2004, there were 188 accidents that had a death toll of more than 10, about one such accident every 7.4 days. After the 2005 Sunjiawan mine disaster, which killed at least 210 miners, a meeting of the State Council was convened to work on measures to improve work safety in coal mines. The meeting's statement indicated serious problems such as violation of safety standards and overproduction in some coal mines. Three billion yuan (360 million US dollars) were dedicated for technological renovation on work safety, gas management in particular, at state-owned major coal mines. The government also promised to send safety supervision teams to 45 coal mines with serious gas problems and invite colliery safety experts to evaluate safety situations in coal mines and formulate prevention measures... United States The Monongah Mining Disaster was the worst mining accident of American history; 362 workers were killed in an underground explosion on December 6, 1907 in Monongah, West Virginia. From 1880 to 1910, mine accidents claimed thousands of fatalities. Where annual mining deaths had numbered more than 1,000 a year during the early part of the 20th century, they decreased to an average of about 500 during the late 1950s, and to 93 during the 1990s. In addition to deaths, many thousands more are injured (an average of 21,351 injuries per year between 1991 and 1999), but overall there has been a downward trend of deaths and injuries. In 1959, the Knox Mine Disaster occurred in Port Griffith, Pennsylvania. The swelling Susquehanna river collapsed into a mine under it and resulted in 12 deaths. In Plymouth, Pennsylvania, the Avondale Mine Disaster resulted in the deaths of 108 miners and two rescue workers after a fire in the only shaft eliminated the oxygen in the mine. Federal laws for mining safety ensued this disaster. Pennsylvania suffered another disaster in 2002 at Quecreek, 9 miners were trapped underground and subsequently rescued after 78 hours. During 2006, 72 miners lost their lives at work, 47 by coal mining. The majority of these fatalities occurred in Kentucky and West Virginia, including the Sago Mine Disaster. On April 5, 2010, in the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster an underground explosion caused the deaths of 29 miners. The U.S. Bureau of Mines was created in 1910 to investigate accidents, advise industry, conduct production and safety research, and teach courses in accident prevention, first aid, and mine rescue. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Acts of 1969 and 1977 set further safety standards for the industry...
Views: 726 Jeff Quitney
Seven Trapped In China Mine Accident
 
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Rescue efforts were underway after a coal mine accident in southwest China left seven miners trapped underground, state media reported on Wednesday (July 24). The accident occurred at around 1:00 a.m. local time on Tuesday (July 23) (1700 GMT MONDAY JULY 22) when 273 miners were working in the shaft of the Shanmushu Coal Mine in Gongxian county, Sichuan province, official Xinhua news agency said. Xinhua said 266 of the miners managed to escape and seven remained missing. No information was provided on the accident. Over 120 rescuers and 20 medical workers have been dispatched to take part in the rescue operation, state broadcaster CCTV reported. Mine officials had planned to replace gas in the 800-metre-deep shaft with nitrogen first before sending rescuers down, local media reported. The cause of the accident is under investigation, CCTV said. The Shanmushu Coal Mine belongs to state-owned Sichuan Coal Group. China's mines are the deadliest in the world because of lax enforcement of safety standards and a rush to feed demand from a robust economy. For more news and videos visit ☛ http://ntdtv.org Follow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevision Add us on Facebook ☛ http://on.fb.me/s5KV2C
Views: 611 NTDTV
Argonaut Mine Disaster - Ephemera
 
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On August 27, 1922 a fire ensued in the Argonaut Mine that trapped 47 miners a mile underground. Over a span of 26 days the lives of everyone in Jackson, California would change forever. What effect does this 95 year old disaster still have on the community of Jackson today?
Views: 1317 Ephemera